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Central African Republic

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By Scott Campbell | December 23, 2013
Chances are, unless you have a particular interest in the continent of Africa, you may have never heard of the Central African Republic. Even now you would have to be paying attention to international news for this landlocked country of 4.5 million to make a blip on your personal radar screen. But you should be paying attention because there is a humanitarian crisis of immense proportions occurring in the Central African Republic. Like too many countries on its continent, CAR - most refer to it by its initials - has been plagued by bad governance since gaining independence from France in 1958.
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NEWS
By Scott Campbell | December 23, 2013
Chances are, unless you have a particular interest in the continent of Africa, you may have never heard of the Central African Republic. Even now you would have to be paying attention to international news for this landlocked country of 4.5 million to make a blip on your personal radar screen. But you should be paying attention because there is a humanitarian crisis of immense proportions occurring in the Central African Republic. Like too many countries on its continent, CAR - most refer to it by its initials - has been plagued by bad governance since gaining independence from France in 1958.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | April 17, 2003
Many years ago, when Rick Kittles' white classmates would compare their families' ethnic origins, they all talked about countries such as Ireland, Italy or Germany. When they asked him about his roots, Kittles recalled, "I would say, `Africa.' Other times, I would make stuff up and say, `I'm a Mandingo.' That bothered me, not knowing more about where in Africa." Like most African-American descendants of slaves, he had no better answers because slavery worked to strip its victims of their heritage, even their names.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 10, 2006
KALANDAO, Central African Republic -- The rumble of engines, any engines, is the signal for the villagers here to flee, leaving behind smoldering pots of wild roots and leaves, a meager afternoon meal. Their haste was so great on a recent afternoon that they left something else behind - a little girl in a filthy white shirt. She wailed as she sat, utterly alone, struggling to stand, much less flee, on slender, uncertain legs. The Central African Republic - important as a potential bulwark against the chaos and misery of its neighbors in Chad and the Darfur region of Sudan - is being dragged into the dangerous and ever-expanding conflict that has begun to engulf central Africa.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 10, 2006
KALANDAO, Central African Republic -- The rumble of engines, any engines, is the signal for the villagers here to flee, leaving behind smoldering pots of wild roots and leaves, a meager afternoon meal. Their haste was so great on a recent afternoon that they left something else behind - a little girl in a filthy white shirt. She wailed as she sat, utterly alone, struggling to stand, much less flee, on slender, uncertain legs. The Central African Republic - important as a potential bulwark against the chaos and misery of its neighbors in Chad and the Darfur region of Sudan - is being dragged into the dangerous and ever-expanding conflict that has begun to engulf central Africa.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE TC | May 26, 1996
BANGUI, Central African Republic -- One week after an army mutiny that turned into a cyclone of looting and protest against an unpopular government and against French intervention, the deployment of hundreds more French troops showed no signs of decisively tipping the balance in favor of the elected president, Ange-Felix Patasse.Yesterday the looting moved from the city center, where nearly every business has been smashed and emptied, to the affluent neighborhoods on the banks of the Ubangi River, where most senior diplomats live.
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Staff writer | April 29, 1992
As Peace Corps volunteer Judith Denny showed slides from her two-year stay in the Central African Republic to students at George Fox Middle School yesterday, hands shot up in the air."How do they iron their clothes?" one student asked."Don't they get hot in all those clothes?" asked another."What's a latrine?" wondered a third.Denny answered each question -- and there were many -- the students had about life in the Central African country.A native of Newark, Del., Denny visited teacher Karen Muir's class as part of the World Wise School program.
NEWS
November 5, 1996
Jean-Bedel Bokassa, 75, one of Africa's most ruthless dictators who was accused of slaughtering and eating some of his critics, died of a heart attack Sunday in Bangui, Central African Republic.Mr. Bokassa, who ruled as self-proclaimed "emperor" from 1966 until 1979, had been in poor health since collapsing in 1995 from a brain hemorrhage.The army lieutenant colonel's 13-year rule began when he seized power in 1966, six years after the country gained independence from France.He used the country's resources to increase his fortune while the living standard of his 3.4 million subjects stagnated.
NEWS
By Marc LeGoff and Marc LeGoff,Staff writer | November 20, 1991
Gov. William Donald Schaefer told Karen Muir's seventh-grade geography class that he's just as guilty as the next guy when it comes to running water needlessly while brushing his teeth.But during his visit yesterday he urged the George Fox Middle School students to thinkabout different ways they could conserve water and other natural resources.Muir's class is one of 62 statewide that will correspond with classrooms all over the globe in the World Wise Schools program developed by the Peace Corps and the National Governor's Association as part of American Education Week.
NEWS
June 14, 1995
James F. Bogan, 82, captain of the fishing vessel that rescued 67 passengers from the burning ocean liner Morro Castle in 1934 off Sea Girt, N.J., died Saturday at his home in Sea Girt.A. Darius Davis, 89, the last surviving founder of the Winn-Dixie Stores Inc. supermarket chain, died of a stroke Sunday in Jacksonville, Fla. The company operates 1,186 stores in 14 Southern states, and is the nation's fifth largest supermarket chain.Arthur J. Kropp, 37, president of People for the American Way, a liberal advocacy group that was created to preserve the separation between church and state, died of AIDS on Monday in Washington.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | April 17, 2003
Many years ago, when Rick Kittles' white classmates would compare their families' ethnic origins, they all talked about countries such as Ireland, Italy or Germany. When they asked him about his roots, Kittles recalled, "I would say, `Africa.' Other times, I would make stuff up and say, `I'm a Mandingo.' That bothered me, not knowing more about where in Africa." Like most African-American descendants of slaves, he had no better answers because slavery worked to strip its victims of their heritage, even their names.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE TC | May 26, 1996
BANGUI, Central African Republic -- One week after an army mutiny that turned into a cyclone of looting and protest against an unpopular government and against French intervention, the deployment of hundreds more French troops showed no signs of decisively tipping the balance in favor of the elected president, Ange-Felix Patasse.Yesterday the looting moved from the city center, where nearly every business has been smashed and emptied, to the affluent neighborhoods on the banks of the Ubangi River, where most senior diplomats live.
NEWS
By Edmund Sanders and Edmund Sanders,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 16, 2006
NAIROBI, KENYA -- Frustrated in its attempts to deploy peacekeeping troops to Sudan's troubled Darfur region, the United Nations is considering sending forces to neighboring Chad instead, Secretary-General Kofi Annan said yesterday. "We are looking at the possibility of putting observers or some international presence on the border and working with the government of Chad," Annan said in Nairobi, where he was attending a summit on climate change. Annan said such a presence would reduce cross-border incursions into Chad and protect the estimated 200,000 Darfur refugees who have fled violence in western Sudan and live in camps in Chad.
NEWS
By Ed Brandt and Ed Brandt,Staff Writer | June 7, 1993
Molly Mullally expected culture shock when she went to the Central African Republic to teach math in a village school as a member of the Peace Corps.She didn't expect it when she arrived in Baltimore in 1991 to teach math and French at Canton Middle School in Highlandtown."
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