Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCentral Africa
IN THE NEWS

Central Africa

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 22, 1998
NAIROBI, Kenya -- The U.S. airstrike against a chemical plant in Sudan, in the wake of the twin bombings of the U.S. embassies here and in Tanzania, has increased tensions in an area already in turmoil.With civil war threatening in the Democratic Republic of Congo and insurrections of one kind or another in most of the nearby countries, including Sudan, Central Africa is on the brink of explosion.A war in the Congo could quickly spill over its borders and involve its volatile neighbors, unless South African President Nelson Mandela can broker a last-minute peace agreement this weekend.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2012
The Rev. Gerald "Gerry" Vincent Lardner, a Sulpician priest who taught preaching and later served as a missionary in Africa, died of cancer June 18 at Mercy Medical Center. He was 70 and lived in North Baltimore. Born in Baltimore and raised on Malbrook Road in the Westown section of Catonsville, he attended St. Agnes School. He followed an uncle, the leader of the Sulpician Fathers, in pursuing a religious life. He entered the old St. Charles Seminary in Catonsville as a 13-year-old high school student.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 19, 1994
Capt. Robert Ford, 88, an aviator who made his mark in the era of the flying boat with an unscheduled flight around the globe, died Sunday of pancreatic cancer at his 880-acre cattle ranch at Penn Valley, Calif., north of Sacramento. He was ferrying mail and passengers from San Francisco to New Zealand aboard a Pan American Airways Pacific Clipper on Dec. 7, 1941, when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. Skirting the trouble zone and watching for enemy aircraft, he headed west over Australia, India and Central Africa, then crossed to South America, eventually landing at La Guardia Airport in New York on Jan. 6, 1942.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 25, 2004
Polio has spread to two more African countries that had been free of the crippling disease and threatens to become a major epidemic across west and central Africa, the World Health Organization said yesterday. The disease begins reaching its high season next month. The spread of polio to Guinea and Mali brings to 12 the number of previously polio-free African countries that have experienced an outbreak of the disease since January 2003. The spread deals a serious setback to the agency's efforts to eradicate the disease by year's end, a goal also hampered by a funding gap of $100 million.
NEWS
By Harold Jackson | November 16, 1996
EACH NEW eruption of the Hutu-Tutsi conflict in central Africa -- Rwanda, Burundi, now Zaire -- reminds African Americans of how little they know about the homeland of their ancestors.While many Americans of European, Middle Eastern or Asian descent can identify through family history with modern ethnic conflicts that have occurred in places such as Bosnia, Iraq and Azerbaijan, most African Americans cannot similarly connect the dots.The Africa part they know, but beyond that only some families have been able to determine their deepest ethnic roots.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | November 30, 2000
Members of the Bonds Meadow Rotary club in Westminster are traveling to Tanzania today to help world health organizations battle river blindness, a debilitating disease that has affected hundreds of thousands of people and devastated farming communities in central Africa. Vince Campanella, chairman of Carroll's Economic Development Commission, and Paul Derstine, director of Interchurch Medical Assistance in New Windsor, will spend 10 days in remote villages of Tanzania. They will meet with Tanzanian officials and members of other Rotary clubs.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | August 4, 2002
A peace pact signed in Africa last week generated cheers at a Carroll County-based charity where officials hope to extend their medical aid to areas that have gone years without a doctor's services. Besides enabling volunteers to travel more safely, the agreement between leaders of Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of Congo could help Interchurch Medical Assistance raise money for its aid programs, an official at the charity said. "Peace will make a huge difference," said Dan Metzel, grants manager for the group, which is using a $25 million federal grant to re-establish Congo's health care system.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | August 4, 2002
A peace pact signed in Africa last week generated cheers at a Carroll County-based charity where officials hope to extend their medical aid to areas that have gone years without a doctor's services. Besides enabling volunteers to travel more safely, the agreement between leaders of Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of Congo could help Interchurch Medical Assistance raise money for its aid programs, an official at the charity said. "Peace will make a huge difference," said Dan Metzel, grants manager for the group, which is using a $25 million federal grant to re-establish Congo's health care system.
FEATURES
By Patricia Chargot and Patricia Chargot,Knight Ridder/Tribune | May 4, 1998
Thanks, Mom!Mother's Day is when children in the United States pay tribute to their moms. Americans send a whopping 150 million cards to moms on this day!Mother's Day is generally credited to Anna Reeves Jarvis, who did a lot of volunteer work, including starting a Mother's Friendship Day to reunite families after the Civil War. Her daughter, also named Anna, wrote to newspapers and politicians asking for a national holiday.President Woodrow Wilson declared Mother's Day a national holiday in 1914.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | March 13, 1993
Washington. -- A reasonable surmise is that, about 50 years ago, in east and central Africa, some hunters and their families who ate monkeys became infected with a low-virulence (and for a long time quiescent) progenitor of what is now known to be the virus that causes AIDS. Thus on the continent where the human race may have begun, there began an epidemic.Its dynamics have now led some researchers to an encouraging conclusion: In America, the disease is largely concentrated in perhaps 30 neighborhoods nationwide.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | August 4, 2002
A peace pact signed in Africa last week generated cheers at a Carroll County-based charity where officials hope to extend their medical aid to areas that have gone years without a doctor's services. Besides enabling volunteers to travel more safely, the agreement between leaders of Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of Congo could help Interchurch Medical Assistance raise money for its aid programs, an official at the charity said. "Peace will make a huge difference," said Dan Metzel, grants manager for the group, which is using a $25 million federal grant to re-establish Congo's health care system.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | August 4, 2002
A peace pact signed in Africa last week generated cheers at a Carroll County-based charity where officials hope to extend their medical aid to areas that have gone years without a doctor's services. Besides enabling volunteers to travel more safely, the agreement between leaders of Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of Congo could help Interchurch Medical Assistance raise money for its aid programs, an official at the charity said. "Peace will make a huge difference," said Dan Metzel, grants manager for the group, which is using a $25 million federal grant to re-establish Congo's health care system.
NEWS
July 7, 2001
CIVIL WAR in Congo - seemingly hopeless, inextricably tied to ethnic strife in Rwanda and Burundi, made worse by invasion from five African neighbors - took a turn for the slightly better. A fuel barge under United Nations auspices journeyed 600 miles up the Congo River from government-held Mbandaka to rebel-held Kisangani, for the first time in three years. If security prevails, civil traffic on this immense river lifeline will resume. On the 41st anniversary of Congo's independence from Belgium, Belgian Prime Minister Guy Verhofstadt visited Kinshasa.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | November 30, 2000
Members of the Bonds Meadow Rotary club in Westminster are traveling to Tanzania today to help world health organizations battle river blindness, a debilitating disease that has affected hundreds of thousands of people and devastated farming communities in central Africa. Vince Campanella, chairman of Carroll's Economic Development Commission, and Paul Derstine, director of Interchurch Medical Assistance in New Windsor, will spend 10 days in remote villages of Tanzania. They will meet with Tanzanian officials and members of other Rotary clubs.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 2, 2000
KINASARAM, Chad - This summer, an enormous cloud of reddish-brown dust swept across Florida, coating cars and patio furniture, causing respiratory problems for residents, and creating hazy skies and colorful sunsets. Scientists looking for a culprit found one - 6,000 miles away - at a drought-shriveled Central African lake. Powerful winds were kicking up dust from what was once the bottom of Lake Chad and carrying it across the Atlantic Ocean to the Caribbean islands, the Bahamas and Florida.
NEWS
By Ann M. Simmons and Ann M. Simmons,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 15, 2000
BAYANGA, Central African Republic -- The menacing mimicry of animal cries echoes through tangled rain forest from a band of diminutive human predators. Suddenly, frantic squeals ring out as a scrawny, wide-eyed antelope gets tangled in a net trap. A woman clobbers it with a stick. Two other antelopes meet the same fate this morning, a modest take compared to those of yesteryear. As they have done for more generations than anyone can remember, the Pygmies of the BaAka tribe are on the hunt.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 12, 1994
BUHONGA, Burundi -- In this land where the Nile has its uppermost headwaters, the brief, sudden African dusk had fallen on the rolling mountains, bathing them violet. On the breeze-swept veranda of his parish church and school, a Roman Catholic priest nursed a lukewarm beer and voiced his dread."We live in the fear of each day," he confided. "When I consider history, and people's hearts, I am truly afraid."Just that Friday, he explained, members of Burundi's army had shot and killed seven people in cold blood as they traveled from Bujumbura, the capital at the northeastern tip of Lake Tanganyika, to the terraced slopes of Buhonga.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2012
The Rev. Gerald "Gerry" Vincent Lardner, a Sulpician priest who taught preaching and later served as a missionary in Africa, died of cancer June 18 at Mercy Medical Center. He was 70 and lived in North Baltimore. Born in Baltimore and raised on Malbrook Road in the Westown section of Catonsville, he attended St. Agnes School. He followed an uncle, the leader of the Sulpician Fathers, in pursuing a religious life. He entered the old St. Charles Seminary in Catonsville as a 13-year-old high school student.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 22, 1998
NAIROBI, Kenya -- The U.S. airstrike against a chemical plant in Sudan, in the wake of the twin bombings of the U.S. embassies here and in Tanzania, has increased tensions in an area already in turmoil.With civil war threatening in the Democratic Republic of Congo and insurrections of one kind or another in most of the nearby countries, including Sudan, Central Africa is on the brink of explosion.A war in the Congo could quickly spill over its borders and involve its volatile neighbors, unless South African President Nelson Mandela can broker a last-minute peace agreement this weekend.
FEATURES
By Patricia Chargot and Patricia Chargot,Knight Ridder/Tribune | May 4, 1998
Thanks, Mom!Mother's Day is when children in the United States pay tribute to their moms. Americans send a whopping 150 million cards to moms on this day!Mother's Day is generally credited to Anna Reeves Jarvis, who did a lot of volunteer work, including starting a Mother's Friendship Day to reunite families after the Civil War. Her daughter, also named Anna, wrote to newspapers and politicians asking for a national holiday.President Woodrow Wilson declared Mother's Day a national holiday in 1914.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.