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NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | July 23, 1997
GETTING FIRED is old hat at North Avenue school headquarters."This is the fifth time for me," one of the bureaucrats said last week on receipt of a certified letter from Robert E. Schiller, the interim chief executive officer.When the central administration is reorganized -- which is often -- superintendents and, now, interim chief executive officers traditionally "fire" immediate subordinates and force them to reapply for their jobs or for other jobs in the office. The only difference is that this reshuffling was ordered by Senate Bill 795, the "partnership legislation" that launched the current round of school reform.
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NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | July 23, 1997
GETTING FIRED is old hat at North Avenue school headquarters."This is the fifth time for me," one of the bureaucrats said last week on receipt of a certified letter from Robert E. Schiller, the interim chief executive officer.When the central administration is reorganized -- which is often -- superintendents and, now, interim chief executive officers traditionally "fire" immediate subordinates and force them to reapply for their jobs or for other jobs in the office. The only difference is that this reshuffling was ordered by Senate Bill 795, the "partnership legislation" that launched the current round of school reform.
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NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | November 30, 1995
In the first sign of severe education budget cuts expected next year, the Howard County school system has issued layoff notices to 15 employees in the central administration office.The notices went out as Superintendent Michael E. Hickey is preparing a plan to restructure and streamline the central administration, which could reduce further the number of central office employees.School officials said the notices were the first sizable set since the county's 1991 budget crisis -- when revenue shortfalls resulted in cutbacks that included canceling negotiated teacher raises.
NEWS
May 20, 1996
BY OUSTING Irene Dandridge, who was president of the Baltimore Teachers Union for 17 years, city teachers have demonstrated they want change, more accountability and less coziness with the Schmoke administration and the North Avenue central administration. It now remains for Marcia Brown, 52, the upset election winner by a margin of just 72 votes, to translate those sentiments into a cohesive action program.Even though she has served as BTU's volunteer executive vice president, Ms. Brown, by her own acknowledgment, is not very experienced as a union leader.
NEWS
June 26, 1992
Each new school superintendent in Baltimore City has reorganized the central administration, promising to make it more efficient and responsive and results-oriented. In all, there have been about a dozen reorganizations in the last 25 years. None seems to have produced dramatic improvements in learning. Will one more reorganization be any different?A national consulting firm last night presented the school board with a management study that calls for yet another reorganization of the central administration.
NEWS
May 20, 1996
BY OUSTING Irene Dandridge, who was president of the Baltimore Teachers Union for 17 years, city teachers have demonstrated they want change, more accountability and less coziness with the Schmoke administration and the North Avenue central administration. It now remains for Marcia Brown, 52, the upset election winner by a margin of just 72 votes, to translate those sentiments into a cohesive action program.Even though she has served as BTU's volunteer executive vice president, Ms. Brown, by her own acknowledgment, is not very experienced as a union leader.
NEWS
By Chickie Grayson | October 11, 1990
The city school board is expected to vote tonight on a "school-based management" plan that would transfer much of the authority over education from the central office on North Avenue to the schools themselves. This article and the one at right discuss the concept.TONIGHT the city school board has an opportunity to transfer authority and decision-making from the central administration to local schools. The Citizens Planning and Housing Association thinks it's a good idea, but several issues must be resolved before "restructuring" is adopted.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | December 6, 1995
The much-anticipated administrative restructuring plan for Howard County schools would shift power from the central office to principals and schools, according to a draft released yesterday.The proposal -- which does not call for immediate layoffs among school employees -- says all principals would report directly to Superintendent Michael E. Hickey, eliminating two layers of administrative oversight. That idea drew immediate praise yesterday from local and national educators.The new administrative structure would provide "a direct reporting relationship between the individual charged with system-wide responsibility (the superintendent)
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Staff Writer | April 20, 1993
Walter Caldwell Sr. loved children. The longtime Howard County educator had two of his own and spent most of his life teaching others, touching the lives of many.Mr. Caldwell -- "Poppa Bear," as he was known -- was buried yesterday at Christ Episcopal Church in Columbia. He died Wednesday of a heart attack, about a month after his 63rd birthday. More than 300 friends, colleagues and former students attended his funeral service at the Oakland Mills Meeting House in Columbia.A Howard County educator for more than 22 years, he was Hammond High School's first principal, and later held the same job at Glenelg High.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun Staff Writer | May 3, 1995
A Baltimore County Council audit says that 82 administrative and support jobs worth $5 million a year can be cut from the school budget, setting the stage for a hostile council review of the school board's $608 million spending request next week.The audit targets 12 percent of the school system's central administrators and 7 percent of its support personnel -- mainly secretaries and clerks.School Superintendent Stuart Berger hotly disputed the findings yesterday, calling them "unbelievable."
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | December 6, 1995
The much-anticipated administrative restructuring plan for Howard County schools would shift power from the central office to principals and schools, according to a draft released yesterday.The proposal -- which does not call for immediate layoffs among school employees -- says all principals would report directly to Superintendent Michael E. Hickey, eliminating two layers of administrative oversight. That idea drew immediate praise yesterday from local and national educators.The new administrative structure would provide "a direct reporting relationship between the individual charged with system-wide responsibility (the superintendent)
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | November 30, 1995
In the first sign of severe education budget cuts expected next year, the Howard County school system has issued layoff notices to 15 employees in the central administration office.The notices went out as Superintendent Michael E. Hickey is preparing a plan to restructure and streamline the central administration, which could reduce further the number of central office employees.School officials said the notices were the first sizable set since the county's 1991 budget crisis -- when revenue shortfalls resulted in cutbacks that included canceling negotiated teacher raises.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun Staff Writer | May 3, 1995
A Baltimore County Council audit says that 82 administrative and support jobs worth $5 million a year can be cut from the school budget, setting the stage for a hostile council review of the school board's $608 million spending request next week.The audit targets 12 percent of the school system's central administrators and 7 percent of its support personnel -- mainly secretaries and clerks.School Superintendent Stuart Berger hotly disputed the findings yesterday, calling them "unbelievable."
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,Sun Staff Writer | December 22, 1994
The chairman of the Howard County Council warned the school board yesterday that its ambitious plans to build new schools may need to be curtailed."Looking ahead, there is no way we can ever afford to do all the things we want to do in Howard County," said Charles C. Feaga. "The things are great that we're doing in the county, but the time may come when we can't afford to do all of them, and it may hit us all at once."Mr. Feaga's comments came at the conclusion of the first meeting between the newly elected council and board, as they began preliminary discussions of next year's school budget.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Staff Writer | April 20, 1993
Walter Caldwell Sr. loved children. The longtime Howard County educator had two of his own and spent most of his life teaching others, touching the lives of many.Mr. Caldwell -- "Poppa Bear," as he was known -- was buried yesterday at Christ Episcopal Church in Columbia. He died Wednesday of a heart attack, about a month after his 63rd birthday. More than 300 friends, colleagues and former students attended his funeral service at the Oakland Mills Meeting House in Columbia.A Howard County educator for more than 22 years, he was Hammond High School's first principal, and later held the same job at Glenelg High.
NEWS
By Jerry Baum | January 11, 1993
AFTER a debut bathed in controversy, the rezoning plan for Baltimore city schools goes to formal public hearings this week.The plan has been attacked for its recommendation that K-8 schools be eliminated, and there is understandable fear in some communities over the proposed changes in school boundaries.But these are only two elements of a complicated plan. Other recommendations, virtually undiscussed in the media, raise key policy questions and need to be fully aired.For example, Superintendent Walter Amprey and the school board have made a strong commitment to "school-based management" and to restructuring the central administration from a directive body to one that supports schools.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,Sun Staff Writer | December 22, 1994
The chairman of the Howard County Council warned the school board yesterday that its ambitious plans to build new schools may need to be curtailed."Looking ahead, there is no way we can ever afford to do all the things we want to do in Howard County," said Charles C. Feaga. "The things are great that we're doing in the county, but the time may come when we can't afford to do all of them, and it may hit us all at once."Mr. Feaga's comments came at the conclusion of the first meeting between the newly elected council and board, as they began preliminary discussions of next year's school budget.
NEWS
By Jerry Baum | January 11, 1993
AFTER a debut bathed in controversy, the rezoning plan for Baltimore city schools goes to formal public hearings this week.The plan has been attacked for its recommendation that K-8 schools be eliminated, and there is understandable fear in some communities over the proposed changes in school boundaries.But these are only two elements of a complicated plan. Other recommendations, virtually undiscussed in the media, raise key policy questions and need to be fully aired.For example, Superintendent Walter Amprey and the school board have made a strong commitment to "school-based management" and to restructuring the central administration from a directive body to one that supports schools.
NEWS
June 26, 1992
Each new school superintendent in Baltimore City has reorganized the central administration, promising to make it more efficient and responsive and results-oriented. In all, there have been about a dozen reorganizations in the last 25 years. None seems to have produced dramatic improvements in learning. Will one more reorganization be any different?A national consulting firm last night presented the school board with a management study that calls for yet another reorganization of the central administration.
NEWS
By Chickie Grayson | October 11, 1990
The city school board is expected to vote tonight on a "school-based management" plan that would transfer much of the authority over education from the central office on North Avenue to the schools themselves. This article and the one at right discuss the concept.TONIGHT the city school board has an opportunity to transfer authority and decision-making from the central administration to local schools. The Citizens Planning and Housing Association thinks it's a good idea, but several issues must be resolved before "restructuring" is adopted.
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