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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2013
Anarchists have taken over Center Stage . Not the bomb-throwing kind, but the quip-smacking, horn-honking, non-sequitur-spinning types known as the Marx Brothers. Those indelible siblings - weirdly mustachioed Groucho, fake-Italian Chico, silent Harpo, straight man Zeppo - are being resurrected in an adaptation of "Animal Crackers" that opens the Center Stage season this week. The original "Animal Crackers" was a 1928 Broadway musical that provided a typically nutty stage vehicle for the Marx Brothers and, two years later, an equally nutty film.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2013
For Kwame Kwei-Armah, all the world - or at least, all of Baltimore - really is a stage. Center Stage 's artistic director announced a new program Thursday that would bring cutting-edge and experimental works to unconventional venues around the city. "Third Space(s) productions will allow Center Stage to engage audiences in new, innovative ways that explore what theater can be," Kwei-Armah said in a news release. Three productions will kick off this season. The first, a play by Clare Bayley called "The Container" which will be performed the last weekend of September during the Baltimore Book Festival, is about five refugees who are willing to risk everything to find a new life in England.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2013
A sampling of performing arts summer camps in Baltimore. Camp Center Stage Now in its fourth year, this program has two components - a session July 8 to July 19 for students entering grades one through six; and a session July 22 to Aug. 2 for students entering grades seven through 12. There are about 40 to 50 participants per camp. Hours are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday. The camp is "interdisciplinary," said Rosiland Cauthen, director of community programs and education at Center Stage . "The students not only learn acting, but singing, dancing, musical theater, improvisation, clowning and miming.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2013
Having a big-time Hollywood star, not to mention one of the most prominent figures in live theater today, stop by to see your play is a pretty big deal. Bummer when you're not even there to enjoy the visit, though. Kevin Spacey -- that's Kevin Spacey the two-time Oscar winner, artistic director of London's Old Vic and star of Netflix's shot-in-Baltimore series "House of Cards" -- paid a visit to Center Stage Saturday, to watch its current production of "Beneatha's Place. " Also in the audience was Joi Gresham, of the Lorraine Hansberry Properties Trust.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel | May 28, 2013
Think you have what it takes to snag yourself a bachelor? Or become "The Bachelor"? A casting call announced today is looking for single women and men to participate in ABC's search for bachelorette cast members of "The Bachelor," as well as future Bachelors, to represent Baltimore in the next seasons of the reality shows.  The ABC2 Bachelor Casting Call Party will be held from 5 p.m.-9 p.m. June 13 at Maryland Live! Casino at Arundel Mills, 7002 Arundel Mills Circle in Hanover.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2013
In seven minutes, Tim Kuhn will progress from first date to realizing he'll never be straight. And that terrifies him. As part of Monday night's Stoop Storytelling show at Center Stage, Kuhn will share with a crowd of strangers how he came to terms with being gay. As the show approached, he spent a considerable amount of time revisiting his breakthrough moment, practiced his monologue several times and now says he's more or less ready....
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2013
The multifaceted issue of race continues to cling to this country. Every sign of progress in relations seems to come with an opposite move, so that it often seems as if little has ever really, fundamentally changed since the age of Jim Crow, or even Reconstruction. There is much in this black-and-white vortex for playwrights to mine. I'm not sure if anyone will ever demonstrate that more movingly than Lorraine Hansberry did in 1957 with her incisive drama “A Raisin in the Sun,” but it sure is interesting to see what happens when others try. Two writers have taken “Raisin” as a starting point.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2013
Katherine L. Vaughns, a University of Maryland School of Law professor and secretary of the Center Stage board who immersed herself in the arts community, died of pancreatic cancer May 4 at a Sinai Hospital hospice unit. The Bolton Hill resident was 68. "She was a great, great citizen of Baltimore," said Jed Dietz, director of the Maryland Film Festival. "We dedicated the opening night of the Maryland Film Festival to her. She was the most perfect board member. She did more than you asked, often before you asked.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2013
Kwame Kwei-Armah is turning up the floodlights on Center Stage . It's been not quite two years since the British-born playwright became artistic director of Maryland's largest regional theater. With his production of two button-pushing dramas nicknamed "The Raisin Cycle," the beams emanating from 700 N. Calvert St. are strong enough to be spotted in distant places, from the Big Apple to the Badger State. Articles about the cycle, in which both plays run in repertoire and have the same casts, have appeared in The New York Times, The Boston Globe and the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2013
In Act 1 of “Clybourne Park,” the Pulitzer Prize- and Tony Award-winning play by Bruce Norris receiving a potent Baltimore premiere at Center Stage, civility breaks down as white and black characters in a modest Chicago house start talking about the one thing they'd all rather avoid - race. “I am ashamed of every one of us,” says Bev, a woman determined to emit a June Cleaver neatness and brightness, even though her husband is no Ward, and her son, who served in the Korean War, is now just an unsettling memory.
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