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BUSINESS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Evening Sun Staff | November 9, 1990
Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke has asked David Gillece, president of Baltimore Economic Development Corp., to explore merging BEDCO with Center City-Inner Harbor Development Inc. Both are quasi-public development agencies.The mayor yesterday appointed Gillece as acting president of Center City.The move comes after the resignation of long-time Center City head Albert M. Copp, who left the agency in September after receiving harsh criticism from City Council members and others for the agency's allegedly secretive operating style and poor handling of several downtown development projects.
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NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | March 26, 2013
There was plenty to celebrate when the Howard County Arts Council held its 16th annual Celebration of the Arts. Besides the awards handed out in various categories, there was an announcement that wasn't on the scheduled program for this festive event held Saturday, March 23 at Howard Community College's Smith Theatre. Addressing the well-dressed crowd of arts advocates, Howard County Executive Ken Ulman said: "It's time to have a wonderful, state of the art, 21st-century arts center here in Howard County.
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NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | July 27, 2003
Should a restaurant be supported because of where its owners have bravely decided to locate it? If you're like me, a city dweller, the answer may very well be yes. Center City is an agreeable restaurant on a not-so-agreeable block of East Preston Street just off North Charles. As you approach the entrance, you'll probably be dismayed by the seediness of the other businesses nearby. I was. You'll notice the trash and the cigarette butts on the sidewalk and the general lack of curb appeal for the restaurant itself.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and By Andrea K. Walker | July 11, 2012
Concerns were raised Tuesday in Havre de Grace about plans by Upper Chesapeake Health to include a helicopter pad as part a new hospital complex it is building in center city. Councilmembers and planning officials at a planning committee meeting that they needed to make sure the pad wasn't to close to nearby neighborhoods. City ordinance says that helicopter pads can't be within 1,000 feet of a residence. Read more about it from Aegis reporter Marissa Gallo.          
NEWS
By L. Stuart Ditzen and L. Stuart Ditzen,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 1, 2001
PHILADELPHIA - For 93 years, the big slab of stone held on, clinging, 10 stories up, to the cornice of the Lafayette Building at Fifth and Chestnut streets. On June 6, about 4:30 in the morning, it let go. Dropping straight, the stone crashed onto the sidewalk on Fifth Street and punched a platter-size dent in the concrete. No one was injured. But had the stone fallen a few hours later, when the street would have been crowded with tourists, office workers and shoppers, the result could have been disastrous.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 29, 2000
PHILADELPHIA - Thirty years ago, the local Chamber of Commerce got so nervous about the public perception of Philadelphia that it held a summit to dream up ideas on how to improve the city's image. Even the invitation was grim, featuring a two-bit comedian telling the tired old joke, "I went to Philadelphia last week and it was closed." But while bad Philly jokes persist, the city is now looking on the bright side. It has a cuddly slogan - "The City That Loves You Back" - and is airing TV spots promoting the town around the country and even to its own residents.
NEWS
By Inga Saffron and Inga Saffron,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 10, 2001
PHILADELPHIA - If the 1980s were the skyscraper decade and the '90s the hotel decade, the naughts promise to be the garage decade in Philadelphia. While big commercial projects such as DisneyQuest have fizzled, construction of parking garages in Center City and beyond is continuing at a rapid clip. In the last few months, two multilevel decks and one surface lot have opened. Four more garages are being built, and at least three others are in development. The surprisingly rapid proliferation of multistory garages has caught the attention of a variety of civic and government groups.
NEWS
November 27, 1990
By naming David M. Gillece acting president of Center City-Inner Harbor Development Corp., Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke now has his own appointees in charge of the city's three major development agencies. Does this mean that he is finally ready to put his stamp on a process that was crafted and fine-tuned during William Donald Schaefer's 15-year tenure as mayor?Signs point in that direction. For example, the mayor has asked Mr. Gillece to report within 45 days about merging the Baltimore Economic Development Corp.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and By Andrea K. Walker | July 11, 2012
Concerns were raised Tuesday in Havre de Grace about plans by Upper Chesapeake Health to include a helicopter pad as part a new hospital complex it is building in center city. Councilmembers and planning officials at a planning committee meeting that they needed to make sure the pad wasn't to close to nearby neighborhoods. City ordinance says that helicopter pads can't be within 1,000 feet of a residence. Read more about it from Aegis reporter Marissa Gallo.          
BUSINESS
By Knight Ridder News Service | December 9, 2001
PHILADELPHIA - If you're feeling a bit insecure these days, you're in good company. Home-security firms nationwide have reported a surge in interest in alarm systems since the World Trade Center and Pentagon attacks Sept. 11. There is no evidence that terrorists are singling out individual houses. But even in wartime, there are burglaries. Statistically, at least, the incidence of break-ins and thefts increases whenever the economy weakens. Center City Philadelphia is a good example.
SPORTS
By Zach Helfand, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2012
Are you from here? That freshly painted mural at The Dome at the Madison Square Recreation Center, it wants to know, and it wants to know in big block letters. Everyone wants to know, it seems. After all, it is an advertising slogan for Under Armour, the Locust Point-based apparel company that teamed up with the NBA to renovate The Dome, a facility on East Biddle Street that carries those words on its wall, on the baselines and on the shirts of about 100 kids that were seated on and around the court Monday.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | May 22, 2012
The delegate from the city's northern suburbs is sounding off again about Baltimore crime, calling for the mayor to resign unless she convenes a "solutions summit" and demanding a "citywide curfew" be put in place. Of course, the city already has a curfew, and a curfew center, which not only holds wayward youth but links staff with parents to determine why the children are out later than allowed. The Sun's police reporter, Justin Fenton, visited the center back in August.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2011
City police were investigating a serious shooting that occurred Wednesday afternoon in a Southwest Baltimore shopping center. Detective Kevin Brown, a police spokesman, said a man was shot at least once after getting into a confrontation with another person in the Westside Shopping Center in the 2400 block of Frederick Ave. He was taken to a local hospital, where his condition was not immediately known. Brown said homicide detectives were investigating the case because of the severity of his injuries.
NEWS
March 14, 2011
Baltimore may have lost another 30,000 people during the last decade, but in one key measure of urban vitality, we're holding strong. Downtown Baltimore is the eighth-densest metropolitan core in the United States, with 41,289 residents living within a one-mile radius of Pratt and Light streets. This means that our downtown is denser than those in Denver, San Diego and that big, green park down I-95 known as the District of Columbia. We still trail New York, San Francisco, Chicago, Philadelphia, Los Angeles, Seattle and Boston in residents dwelling within the center city.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2010
Officials from the Baltimore housing department and a private management company were investigating the cause of a carbon monoxide leak Friday that prompted the evacuation of 48 people — 36 children and 12 adults — at the Pleasant View Gardens Child Care Center. Those affected were evaluated in a building across the street from the child care center in the 1100 block of E. Fayette St. in East Baltimore. Chief Kevin Cartwright, a Fire Department spokesman, said no one showed symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning, but five people were taken to an area hospital for evaluation.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | October 10, 2009
The decrepit mansion once served as home to the president of the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore, but two decades of brush has grown and, along with vandals, has made it uninhabitable. Cue the goats. In what's the first step to a $10 million project to transform this piece of Druid Hill Park into an environmental and recreational center for the city, the four-legged weed whackers have cleared a half-acre ring of ivy and other invasive species. The herd of 40 will be brought back to clear the rest of the 9-acre parcel that few have used, legally anyway, for years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gina Kazimir and Gina Kazimir,SUN STAFF | June 7, 2001
From its founding 300 years ago as William Penn's planned "greene countrie towne," Philadelphia has been a city meant to be lived in. The neighborhoods of Center City (what natives call "downtown" Philadelphia) and beyond all have their own quirks and personalities. You can amble from the oldest continuously occupied residential street in the country (Elfreth's Alley) past the most historic square mile in all of America, down to the retro-hip of South Street and the ethnic markets of South Philly.
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | September 2, 1996
Philadelphia's Pennsylvania Convention Center, 3 years old in July, is surpassing expectations, luring a million visitors annually.The center has been booked solid. It has defied predictions by boosting hotel occupancy rates even as the number of rooms has grown.When a huge, 1,200-room Marriott hotel opened in Center City last year, "I fully expected that it would draw new demand to the city but not enough to keep occupancy from decreasing," said Peter Tyson, a Philadelphia-based hotel consultant.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2008
Salary: $31,000 Age: 36 Years on the job: 8 How he got started: Smith received a bachelor's degree in youth and family counseling and a master's degree in pastoral counseling from the Family and Bible College, Institute and Seminary in Baltimore. He first worked with young people on a volunteer basis with his church and local schools, then started working with the Department of Recreation and Parks in 2000 as a part-time youth recreation leader. He later switched to full-time work as a recreation leader at the Ralph J. Young Recreation Center in East Baltimore.
NEWS
By John Fritze, Gus G. Sentementes and Lynn Anderson and John Fritze, Gus G. Sentementes and Lynn Anderson,Sun reporters | June 18, 2008
Maryland state prosecutors raided the home of Mayor Sheila Dixon yesterday as part of an investigation into past spending practices at City Hall, the most aggressive move so far in the years-long probe. After spending more than seven hours inside, state prosecutors and police emerged from Dixon's house - in Hunting Ridge, along the city's western border with Baltimore County - carrying boxes, folders and a blue cooler they had brought in with them. Prosecutors declined to comment on the search and gave no indication of what they were looking for or what they removed from Dixon's home.
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