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By Theo Lippman Jr | December 13, 1995
THE DETERMINATION of the government of Baltimore, the American Civil Liberties Union and the Department of Housing and Urban Development to break up high concentrations of black poverty in the city is understandable. It is desirable. But it won't work.Not the way they want to do it. The way they want to do it is take poor residents of the worst-off neighborhoods in the city and move them to Anne Arundel, Baltimore and Howard counties. There are two things wrong with this. In the first place, the counties will resist, successfully, for they are more powerful politically than the city.
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | April 15, 2014
The grand news that Questar Properties wants to build a landmark 43-story apartment building on the site of the old McCormick spice plant near the Inner Harbor must strike some long-timers as shocking. I'm thinking particularly of suburban cynics who seem to take twisted glee in Baltimore's flaws, starting with its reputation for violent crime. They mock and dismiss as fantastical Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's goal of adding 10,000 new families to the city by 2022. Or perhaps I assume the plan for auld McCormick's would elicit shock because of our chronically low expectations.
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BUSINESS
By Kenneth R. Harney | July 31, 1994
Washington -- Here's the headline many congressmen up for election this November would like homeowners and buyers to read this week: "House passes tough anti-redlining home insurance legislation. Minority and low-income consumers to gain new fair housing protections."But here's the real headline: "House passes toothless bill" that will do virtually nothing to curb central city redlining in home insurance policy availability, pricing or coverage.By a voice vote July 20, the House defeated a bill approved by its banking committee that had the strong support of consumer, civil rights, and housing groups concerned about discriminatory home insurance practices in urban markets around the country.
NEWS
July 9, 2013
Tomorrow City Councilman Carl Stokes plans to hold a hearing on a resolution calling on the developers of the tony Harbor Point project on Baltimore's waterfront to invest at least $15.6 million into the nearby Perkins Homes public housing development. It gets at a vital issue - whether tax incentives for downtown development benefit the city's poor residents - but does so by means of a number of misconceptions. Mr. Stokes has been a strong critic of the use of tax incentives for the construction of Harbor Point, and although we do not have a philosophical objection to such deals, we appreciate his diligence in the matter.
NEWS
July 9, 2013
Tomorrow City Councilman Carl Stokes plans to hold a hearing on a resolution calling on the developers of the tony Harbor Point project on Baltimore's waterfront to invest at least $15.6 million into the nearby Perkins Homes public housing development. It gets at a vital issue - whether tax incentives for downtown development benefit the city's poor residents - but does so by means of a number of misconceptions. Mr. Stokes has been a strong critic of the use of tax incentives for the construction of Harbor Point, and although we do not have a philosophical objection to such deals, we appreciate his diligence in the matter.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,SUN STAFF | April 7, 1997
It is the government's biggest peacetime mobilization: Open hundreds of offices, hire an army of temporary employees and mail forms to 119 million housing units. The object: a statistical snapshot of who and where an estimated 274 million U.S. residents are on April 1, 2000.The census, the national head count that has been taken every decade since 1790, is still three years away, but a sense of urgency is already developing on Capitol Hill and at U.S. Census Bureau headquarters in Suitland.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2013
The Baltimore Development Corp. has accused City Councilman Carl Stokes of spreading misleading information about the $1 billion Harbor Point development and how it qualified for tax breaks meant for impoverished areas. Stokes, chairman of the City Council's taxation committee, has been critical of the way the city's quasi-public development arm drew its new Enterprise Zone map, allowing the developers of Harbor Point to benefit from a projected $88 million in property tax credits.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | April 15, 2014
The grand news that Questar Properties wants to build a landmark 43-story apartment building on the site of the old McCormick spice plant near the Inner Harbor must strike some long-timers as shocking. I'm thinking particularly of suburban cynics who seem to take twisted glee in Baltimore's flaws, starting with its reputation for violent crime. They mock and dismiss as fantastical Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's goal of adding 10,000 new families to the city by 2022. Or perhaps I assume the plan for auld McCormick's would elicit shock because of our chronically low expectations.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 12, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Two years from the start of the 2000 Census, it is shaping up as the most contentious in 80 years, generating fierce debate in Congress, and litigation aimed at blocking the Census Bureau from changing the way it does business.During the past year, the dispute over the bureau's plans to alter its method of counting the population delayed passage of a disaster relief bill for victims of flooding in the Midwest, prompted Congress and the Clinton administration to set up an outside board to monitor the bureau and generated two lawsuits, including one by House Speaker Newt Gingrich.
NEWS
September 6, 1998
THE CENSUS that takes place every 10 years has evolved into one of those issues that stirs passions. That is because the census touches on so many matters, ranging from serious to momentous. It influences how government dollars will be spent, determines the number of seats each state will have in Congress, and, according to a recent report, highlights the steady, shifting demographics of this region.The Bureau of the Census acknowledges it has not counted every head in the past. In 1970, the estimated undercount for African Americans was 6.5 percent; the latest census, 1990, did not count an estimated 8 million people and miscounted another 4 million.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2013
The Baltimore Development Corp. has accused City Councilman Carl Stokes of spreading misleading information about the $1 billion Harbor Point development and how it qualified for tax breaks meant for impoverished areas. Stokes, chairman of the City Council's taxation committee, has been critical of the way the city's quasi-public development arm drew its new Enterprise Zone map, allowing the developers of Harbor Point to benefit from a projected $88 million in property tax credits.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 12, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Two years from the start of the 2000 Census, it is shaping up as the most contentious in 80 years, generating fierce debate in Congress, and litigation aimed at blocking the Census Bureau from changing the way it does business.During the past year, the dispute over the bureau's plans to alter its method of counting the population delayed passage of a disaster relief bill for victims of flooding in the Midwest, prompted Congress and the Clinton administration to set up an outside board to monitor the bureau and generated two lawsuits, including one by House Speaker Newt Gingrich.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,SUN STAFF | April 7, 1997
It is the government's biggest peacetime mobilization: Open hundreds of offices, hire an army of temporary employees and mail forms to 119 million housing units. The object: a statistical snapshot of who and where an estimated 274 million U.S. residents are on April 1, 2000.The census, the national head count that has been taken every decade since 1790, is still three years away, but a sense of urgency is already developing on Capitol Hill and at U.S. Census Bureau headquarters in Suitland.
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | December 13, 1995
THE DETERMINATION of the government of Baltimore, the American Civil Liberties Union and the Department of Housing and Urban Development to break up high concentrations of black poverty in the city is understandable. It is desirable. But it won't work.Not the way they want to do it. The way they want to do it is take poor residents of the worst-off neighborhoods in the city and move them to Anne Arundel, Baltimore and Howard counties. There are two things wrong with this. In the first place, the counties will resist, successfully, for they are more powerful politically than the city.
BUSINESS
By Kenneth R. Harney | July 31, 1994
Washington -- Here's the headline many congressmen up for election this November would like homeowners and buyers to read this week: "House passes tough anti-redlining home insurance legislation. Minority and low-income consumers to gain new fair housing protections."But here's the real headline: "House passes toothless bill" that will do virtually nothing to curb central city redlining in home insurance policy availability, pricing or coverage.By a voice vote July 20, the House defeated a bill approved by its banking committee that had the strong support of consumer, civil rights, and housing groups concerned about discriminatory home insurance practices in urban markets around the country.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | April 19, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Federal regulators, bowing to intense opposition from bankers and Republicans in control of Congress, have dropped a proposal to require lenders to collect and report information on the race and gender of their small-business borrowers.The decision was disclosed yesterday as the four banking agencies prepared for final adoption today of a thorough overhaul of regulations aimed at encouraging banks and savings and loan institutions to make more loans in low-income and moderate-income areas.
BUSINESS
May 11, 1997
Prospective homebuyers and renters who have questions about the area they are thinking of moving into may find the answers in Neighborhood I.D. from Advicon LLC in White Plains, in Charles County.Neighborhood I.D. reports contains demographic information for a one-mile radius surrounding the address customers are considering moving to. Reports can also be ordered by street intersection, ZIP code, town or city, census tract or county.The National Association of Realtors says, "It is unlawful for real estate professionals to encourage or discourage the purchase or rental of a home because of the racial, ethnic or religious dTC composition of a neighborhood.
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