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NEWS
By Erica L. Green | April 7, 2010
Baltimore County police and fire units responded Tuesday morning after a suspicious powder was found at a processing center for the U.S. Census Bureau in Essex. The powder was found to be harmless, a Fire Department spokeswoman said. Police and fire departments were called about 10 a.m. to the Census Bureau's Data Capture Center, in the 8400 block of Kelso Drive, to examine a package containing a small amount of powder. "We did not evacuate the building, no one was showing symptoms, there were no transports," said Fire Department spokeswoman Elise Armacost.
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 21, 2002
Maryland's population rose to nearly 5.46 million this year, a 1.3 percent increase in line with the growth rates of other mid-Atlantic states, according to U.S. Census Bureau estimates released yesterday. Most of the growth came from births, said Melissa Therrien, a Census Bureau demographer. Maryland had about 31,000 more births than deaths. Another source of growth was 25,000 people migrating from other states. The Census Bureau estimated that Maryland received 16,000 immigrants. The estimates, which are based on the 2000 census and other population data and figure in federal funding for states, indicated that Maryland added 72,058 residents from July 1, 2001, to July 1, 2002.
NEWS
By Martin C. Evans | July 31, 1991
Saying quiet diplomacy has gotten the city nowhere, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke announced yesterday that Baltimore will join 15 other cities in a lawsuit that seeks to force the Census Bureau to adjust the 1990 census to reflect 5.3 million uncounted Americans."
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Mark Bomster and Michael A. Fletcher and Mark Bomster,Evening Sun Staff Jay Merwin and Bruce Reid contributed to this story | September 14, 1990
Pearl Rzeczkowski has lived in the same house on Gough Street for 40 years, but when the Census Bureau did its Baltimore count it somehow missed her."Nobody has been around," Rzeczkowski said today.Asked whether she heard that the census was being taken, she said, "I may have heard it but I didn't pay it any mind."Rzeczkowski apparently is not alone. City officials say she is among an estimated 20,000 Baltimoreans missed during the recent census count. As a result, Baltimore is asking the Census Bureau to adjust preliminary figures showing that the city has lost 66,000 residents -- 8.5 percent of its population -- over the past decade.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2012
Not even three years ago, it seemed like there was still a long way to go before D.C. had more people than Baltimore. At the time of the 2010 census, Baltimore had nearly 20,000 more residents than Washington: 620,961 to 601,723. But Washington's growth has been booming for more than a decade, while Baltimore's population is stagnant. The District gained more than 13,000 residents between July 2011 and July 2012. The U.S. Census Bureau on Thursday put D.C.'s population on July 1, 2012 at 632,323 -- up from 619,020 a year earlier.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 26, 1998
WASHINGTON -- After years of racial, ethnic, geographical and politically partisan conflict across the nation, the Supreme Court is about to enter the debate over how the American people will be counted in the year 2000.The U.S. Census Bureau, in pursuit of the accuracy that has eluded census takers throughout American history, has touched off a nationwide struggle over power and money by planning to use modern statistical sampling techniques on an unprecedented scale.On Monday the justices will hear arguments in two cases asking whether federal law or the Constitution bars the use of sampling in determining how many people live in each part of the United States.
NEWS
By Ben Winton and Ben Winton,Phoenix Gazette | November 22, 1992
PHOENIX -- The U.S. Census Bureau announced last wee that Cherokees are the largest Indian tribe in the United States.But the results, which tribes expected based on preliminary estimates, only reinforce what many already knew: There are plenty of Indian "wanna-bes" out there.In fact, the Census Bureau counted a group of Cherokees that neither tribal leaders nor the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs has ever heard of -- Echota Cherokees."I don't know what this Echota thing is," said Lynn Howard, communications director of the Cherokee Nation in Oklahoma.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 12, 1995
WASHINGTON -- A smaller percentage of Americans are pulling up their roots and moving out of state than at any time since 1950, the Census Bureau said yesterday, suggesting that the great postwar population shifts that reshaped the country's political, social and economic landscape have, for the moment, come to an end.The Census Bureau figures show an overall decline in Americans' mobility. It said that about 16.7 percent of the population changed residences during a one-year period ending in March 1994, far below the 20 percent that moved in a typical year during the 1950s and 1960s and the second-lowest level of mobility since 1948 when the Census Bureau began tracking such movement.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 12, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Two years from the start of the 2000 Census, it is shaping up as the most contentious in 80 years, generating fierce debate in Congress, and litigation aimed at blocking the Census Bureau from changing the way it does business.During the past year, the dispute over the bureau's plans to alter its method of counting the population delayed passage of a disaster relief bill for victims of flooding in the Midwest, prompted Congress and the Clinton administration to set up an outside board to monitor the bureau and generated two lawsuits, including one by House Speaker Newt Gingrich.
NEWS
By CHRISTOPHER STOLLAR and CHRISTOPHER STOLLAR,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | October 12, 2005
WASHINGTON -- The number of Marylanders who received food stamps in 2001 was almost twice what the Census Bureau reported, an undercount that could have far-reaching implications for the poor, the nonprofit groups that defend them and the state that helps support them. A report co-written by analysts from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Maryland Department of Human Resources and the Census Bureau found that 157,857 people received food stamps in 2001 -- almost double the 87,429 figure given by the federal government.
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