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NEWS
By Baltimore Sun reporter | April 6, 2010
Suspicious powder was found this morning at a processing center of the U.S. Census Bureau in Essex, though it was found to be harmless. The Baltimore County police and fire departments were called around 10 a.m. to the U.S. Census Bureau's Data Capture Center, in the 8400 block of Kelso Drive, to examine a package containing a small amount of powder, said Elise Armacost, the fire department spokeswoman. "We did not evacuate the building, no one was showing symptoms, there were no transports," Armacost said.
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 21, 2002
Maryland's population rose to nearly 5.46 million this year, a 1.3 percent increase in line with the growth rates of other mid-Atlantic states, according to U.S. Census Bureau estimates released yesterday. Most of the growth came from births, said Melissa Therrien, a Census Bureau demographer. Maryland had about 31,000 more births than deaths. Another source of growth was 25,000 people migrating from other states. The Census Bureau estimated that Maryland received 16,000 immigrants. The estimates, which are based on the 2000 census and other population data and figure in federal funding for states, indicated that Maryland added 72,058 residents from July 1, 2001, to July 1, 2002.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green | April 7, 2010
Baltimore County police and fire units responded Tuesday morning after a suspicious powder was found at a processing center for the U.S. Census Bureau in Essex. The powder was found to be harmless, a Fire Department spokeswoman said. Police and fire departments were called about 10 a.m. to the Census Bureau's Data Capture Center, in the 8400 block of Kelso Drive, to examine a package containing a small amount of powder. "We did not evacuate the building, no one was showing symptoms, there were no transports," said Fire Department spokeswoman Elise Armacost.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2011
Nearly 3,000 businesses or business locations shut down in Maryland in recessionary 2009, the Census Bureau said Thursday. The new figures, which track employers of all sizes, also show a loss of 110,000 private-sector jobs from March 2008 to March 2009 — a bigger hit than earlier estimates from the U.S. Department of Labor had suggested. The Labor Department measured the private-sector drop at 83,000 jobs. The Census Bureau's data is drawn primarily from businesses' tax filings to the Internal Revenue Service, while the more-timely Labor Department figures come from surveys.
NEWS
By DIANA NGUYEN | Capital News Service | January 23, 2010
WASHINGTON - The Maryland Hispanic population has increased by at least 65 percent since the 2000 Census, contributing to increasing ethnic diversity nationally, according to a new U.S. Census Bureau report. There are 375,830 Hispanics living in Maryland as of 2007, an increase from 227,916 in 2000, according to Census Bureau data analyzed by the Maryland Department of Planning and released Wednesday. After Hispanics, Asian immigration ranks second with a 29 percent increase. The Census Bureau American Community Survey reported that the massive increase in immigration from Latin American and Asian countries over the last 40 years "has been the major force changing the racial and ethnic composition of the American population."
NEWS
By Martin C. Evans | July 31, 1991
Saying quiet diplomacy has gotten the city nowhere, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke announced yesterday that Baltimore will join 15 other cities in a lawsuit that seeks to force the Census Bureau to adjust the 1990 census to reflect 5.3 million uncounted Americans."
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Mark Bomster and Michael A. Fletcher and Mark Bomster,Evening Sun Staff Jay Merwin and Bruce Reid contributed to this story | September 14, 1990
Pearl Rzeczkowski has lived in the same house on Gough Street for 40 years, but when the Census Bureau did its Baltimore count it somehow missed her."Nobody has been around," Rzeczkowski said today.Asked whether she heard that the census was being taken, she said, "I may have heard it but I didn't pay it any mind."Rzeczkowski apparently is not alone. City officials say she is among an estimated 20,000 Baltimoreans missed during the recent census count. As a result, Baltimore is asking the Census Bureau to adjust preliminary figures showing that the city has lost 66,000 residents -- 8.5 percent of its population -- over the past decade.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2012
Not even three years ago, it seemed like there was still a long way to go before D.C. had more people than Baltimore. At the time of the 2010 census, Baltimore had nearly 20,000 more residents than Washington: 620,961 to 601,723. But Washington's growth has been booming for more than a decade, while Baltimore's population is stagnant. The District gained more than 13,000 residents between July 2011 and July 2012. The U.S. Census Bureau on Thursday put D.C.'s population on July 1, 2012 at 632,323 -- up from 619,020 a year earlier.
EXPLORE
July 13, 2011
Jean and John King, of Laurel; and Carol and Allen Heyne, of Bloomingdale, Ill., announce the engagement of their children, Kimberly King and Matthew Heyne. The bride-to-be is a 2002 graduate of Eleanor Roosevelt High School and a 2006 graduate of the University of Maryland. She is currently employed by theU.S. Census Bureau. A 2009 graduate of the University of Maryland, the future groom is employed byU.S. Department of Homeland Security. A September wedding is planned.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2010
A U.S. Census worker was killed while dropping off a co-worker in Southeast Baltimore last week, according to police and the Census Bureau. Spencer Williams, 22, was found shot June 7 inside his vehicle, which had pulled onto a median in the 1100 block of New Hope Circle, police said. He died Friday morning at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Williams was a crew leader responsible for a group of census takers who are doing follow-up visits at the homes of people who did not mail in their questionnaires by April, a Census Bureau spokeswoman confirmed.
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