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NEWS
March 18, 2010
With apologies to Peter Schmuck, I'd like to examine and comment on a few of the major, ostensible goals of the census: Item: Collection of demographic data to include age, sex, race, national/ethic origin, living arrangements, and dwelling type. My take: All of this to be spit back at us in charts and graphs to further advance class/group envy, divisiveness, pitting one American against another and the perversion of our cherished motto from "E pluribus unum" into "E pluribus squared."
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NEWS
Susan Reimer | September 23, 2013
If you like paint-by-numbers, the data just released by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the U.S. Census create a picture of the United States that is not inspiring. We spend the biggest part of our day - 9 hours and 12 minutes - commuting and working and the other big chunk - 7 hours and 39 minutes - sleeping. Data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics show we spend 6 minutes or less on education and talking to people on the phone. We spend three hours on "leisure," and almost all of that is watching TV. We spend proportionally more on housing now (41 percent of our income)
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NEWS
March 18, 2010
I find it unbelievable that the cost for the 2010 census is estimated at just under $15 billion. A quick calculation shows that the cost translates to almost $50 per U.S. citizen. In this day of number crunching and data mining, this per capita cost seems excessive. I am sure if this process were placed under bid by private contractors, a less costly and more efficient process would ensue. This government endeavor only provides fodder for those who condemn government services. Chris Shane, Towson
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2013
Baltimore's challenge challenge to the 2010 Census count netted the city a small population bump. Instead of being home to 620,961 people on April 1, 2010, as the U.S. Census Bureau reported in 2011, Baltimore actually had 621,074 residents - an increase of 113 people, federal records show. That's a far smaller increase than Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and other Baltimore officials had hoped for. The city's planning department argued in its appeal that census workers did not count 15,635 housing units in Baltimore.
NEWS
March 23, 2010
Thank you to The Sun for your March 18 editorial urging prompt response by all Marylanders to the 2010 census ("Return your census form," March 18). We're off to a great start. After the first week, 24 percent of Maryland households had returned their forms -- nearly twice the national average. Folks have remarked to us that, as advertised, they're easy and quick to fill out. But the work of Maryland's Complete Count committee isn't over. We're reaching out to community leaders, clergy and others to spread the message, especially in economically challenged areas that are traditionally the hardest to count.
NEWS
June 15, 2010
The U.S. Census is a good bureau to work for, but on June 14, Spencer Williams was shot and killed while taking a coworker home. This young man worked for the U.S. census and was a team leader. It's sad that this happened to him, but crime is everywhere these days. People who live in Baltimore just don't say "B-more careful!" for no reason. My sympathy goes out to his family. He just celebrated his 23rd birthday a couple of days before he was gunned down. I hope police find the person or persons who did this and punish them to the full extent.
NEWS
September 17, 1990
Mayor Schmoke has abandoned his wait-and-see attitude regarding the accuracy of the U.S. Census count that showed Baltimore's population declining by some 66,000 people during the past decade, a drop of 8.5 percent that was nearly a third again larger than expected. Last week Schmoke joined a growing chorus of mayors across the country who are challenging the official figures that will serve as the basis for distributing vast amounts of federal aid in the 1990s.The city's case rests on an apparent discrepancy between the number of households identified by census workers from mailing lists and the number of households indicated by city property records and utility company accounts.
NEWS
April 5, 2010
I found the talkback comments regarding The Sun's Sunday editorial on the need for Marylanders to respond to the national census distressing ("Getting it right," April 4). To think a simple census questionaire can bring out that kind of mean spiritedness! To find something negative is one thing, but the mean spirited tone of the comments is itself a sad commentary of the state of community in our area if not in the country. I wonder if people understand what they are angry about and the negative effect such anger has on them and on the fabric of America.
NEWS
April 11, 2010
A fire official says one person was transported to a hospital after a white powder was discovered at an Essex office that processes census forms. Baltimore County Fire Department Lt. John Milby said crews spent about 3 1/2 hours on scene and collected some of the material for testing. He said there were "some reports of some skin irritation." Milby said officials got a 911 call at 11 o'clock but it was not clear what symptoms the person taken to the hospital had. - Associated Press
NEWS
By Brent Jones | brent.jones@baltsun.com | December 25, 2009
The image is appropriate for Christmas: Joseph leads a donkey on which Mary rides, a star shining above them on their journey to Bethlehem. But the poster's message, in Spanish and aimed at illegal immigrants, strikes many as inappropriate: "This is how Jesus was born ... Joseph and Mary participated in the census ... Don't be afraid." Worshippers at the Rev. Angel Nunez's church in East Baltimore received their first glimpses of the poster during services this week, enthusiastically greeting the image that connects the birth of Jesus Christ and the 2010 census, the pastor says.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2013
The Baltimore school system ranked second among the nation's 100 largest school districts in how much it spent per pupil in fiscal year 2011, according to data released Tuesday by the U.S. Census Bureau. The city's $15,483 per-pupil expenditure was second to New York City's $19,770. Rounding out the top five were Montgomery County, which spent $15,421; Milwaukee public schools at $14,244; and Prince George's County public schools, which spent $13,775. The Census Bureau also noted the first decrease in per-pupil spending nationally since 1977, the year the figures were first tracked.
NEWS
By Stephen Walters | April 7, 2013
When cities become dysfunctional, we do not quickly abandon them and our established social networks and routines. And after a city puts itself back together, we may take years to become convinced that the bad old days are over. Awareness of these facts likely accounts for City Hall's mature, muted response to the Census Bureau's latest population report: after six straight decades of embarrassing shrinkage, Baltimore has grown by about 1,100 residents since mid-2011. But there has been no triumphant rhetoric from Mayor Rawlings-Blake.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2013
Baltimore, coming off six decades of population decline, grew by 1,100 residents in 12 months, according to government estimates released Thursday. "It's such amazing news. … It's huge psychologically," said Seema D. Iyer, a former research chief for the city's planning department now with the University of Baltimore's Jacob France Institute. For years, the U.S. Census Bureau's annual calculation delivered to the city disappointing news of a falling population, but now it seems to be turning around.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2013
Baltimore draws 117,027 commuters daily from Baltimore County, among the highest single-source commute totals in the nation, according to a survey released today by the U.S. Census Bureau. The number - the equivalent of filling both M&T Bank Stadium and Camden Yards to capacity - ranks the city 16th in worker flow behind the New York, Los Angeles and Dallas suburbs and the number ofcommuters going from Prince George's County to jobs in Washington, D.C. Included in the total of 207,000 people who come to Baltimore each day for work are 21,719 from Anne Arundel County and 17,966 from Harford County, according to estimates from the American Community Survey.
NEWS
March 4, 2013
The Census Bureau announced last week that it is dropping the use of the term "Negro" to describe black Americans in its population surveys. I suspect few will mourn the word's passing. Today Americans of African descent, especially younger ones, almost universally prefer to be called African-American, people of color or simply black. The bureau reports that the number of blacks who self-identify as Negroes has dwindled to fewer than 50,000, most of them older people living in the South.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2012
“The nation's overall mover rate increased from a record low of 11.6 percent in 2011 to 12.0 percent in 2012,” the U.S. Census Bureau has announced. Roughly 36.1 million people who were one year and older moved in 2012, the statistics service said. The majority of those moves - 64.4 percent - were within the same county. “The overall mover rate for the nation has increased since a record low. However, compared to previous years, mobility is still low for even our most mobile age group (18 to 29 year olds)
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 23, 2000
ISTANBUL, Turkey - Istanbul, one of the world's largest and most cosmopolitan cities, was a virtual ghost town yesterday as Turks were confined to their homes for a national census. From 5 a.m. to 7 p.m., Turkey's estimated 65 million people were required to stay in their homes as 950,000 census-takers went door- to-door. Police patrolled streets across the country to ensure compliance. To keep people home, some cities relied on carrots and others resorted to sticks. Everyone counted in Denizli was entered in a lottery for a chance to win a gold coin.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2012
After three years of increases, the nation's poverty rate held steady from 2010 to 2011, according to data released Wednesday by the U.S. Census Bureau that also detailed trends in health insurance coverage and median income. Nationwide, 15 percent of people, or about 46.2 million individuals, lived below the poverty line in 2011, according to estimates in the Annual Social and Economic Supplement of the Census Bureau's Current Population Survey. Last year, the Census Bureau considered a family of two adults and two children in poverty if its annual household income was under $22,811.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | August 10, 2012
Good news for all you earnest economy watchers out there. The U.S. Census Bureau today released its first mobile app called "America's Economy. " The Census built the app with some nifty features, such as notifications and social sharing to Twitter and Facebook. Now you can spread the joys and pitfalls of the U.S. economy with friends, family and followers! You'll have easy access to the following 16 key indicators: Advance Monthly Retail Sales; New Residential Construction; New Residential Sales; Construction Spending; International Trade; Advance Report Durable Goods; Business Inventories; Manufacturers' Goods; Monthly Wholesale; Homeownership Rate; Quarterly Services Survey; QFR - Retail Trade; QFR - Manufacturing; Gross Domestic Product; Personal Income and Outlays; Unemployment Rate.
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