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NEWS
By Cal Thomas | February 25, 2012
Pat Buchanan might have seen the end of the line coming at MSNBCwhen, last month, network president Phil Griffin commented on his latest book, "Suicide of a Superpower," by saying, "I don't think the ideas that [Buchanan] put forth are appropriate for the national dialogue, much less on MSNBC. " When Mr. Buchanan was let go last week after 10 years as a commentator on the network, no one was surprised. I don't agree with some of Mr. Buchanan's ideas, especially regarding Jews, his questioning of whether World War II had to happen or whether the United States should be involved militarily in the Middle East, but he has every right to his ideas, as we all have the right to our own. It's called free speech.
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2012
Bit of a kerfuffle in the book division of the Land of Pleasant Living over the decision by the Harford County Public Library not to stock the popular novel Fifty Shades of Grey . Today The Sun publishes a letter by Mary Hastler, the library director, defending her decision, and it looks disingenuous. No librarian wishes to be accused of censorship, and Ms. Hastler takes umbrage at the accusation. She merely "decision to not purchase 'Fifty Shades of Grey' ... after careful review and research following our materials selection process.
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NEWS
January 24, 1992
Austrian artist Josef Schutzenhofer owes a lot to the Frederick County legislative delegation's attempts to appease critics of an anti-war painting depicting President Bush in the nude. The work, on display at the Delaplaine Visual Arts Center in Frederick, has offended a number of people, and reports of the painting have apparently outraged others who haven't even seen it. Frederick County lawmakers responded by delaying the introduction of a bill that would provide $500,000 in matching funds for the center to renovate an old mill as a permanent home.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | February 25, 2012
Pat Buchanan might have seen the end of the line coming at MSNBCwhen, last month, network president Phil Griffin commented on his latest book, "Suicide of a Superpower," by saying, "I don't think the ideas that [Buchanan] put forth are appropriate for the national dialogue, much less on MSNBC. " When Mr. Buchanan was let go last week after 10 years as a commentator on the network, no one was surprised. I don't agree with some of Mr. Buchanan's ideas, especially regarding Jews, his questioning of whether World War II had to happen or whether the United States should be involved militarily in the Middle East, but he has every right to his ideas, as we all have the right to our own. It's called free speech.
NEWS
By JONATHAN POWER | October 20, 1995
LONDON -- Next week most of the world's leaders will meet in New York to celebrate the United Nation's 50th anniversary. Everyone, in the end, even if they don't pay their dues, even as they criticize it, wants it to stay in place. It remains the best all-in-one forum for settling disputes, highlighting oppression, quenching financial crises, aiding the poor and keeping the airlines and the post moving -- and it's all done on a budget of less than a major western city.A culture of dishonestyIf we didn't have it, we would want to create it. But would we want to recreate it with its most serious flaw -- a culture of dishonesty, that is stuffed with apparatchiks, whose reflexes are too often to fudge and mudge?
FEATURES
By Craig Eisendrath and Craig Eisendrath,Special to the sun | August 2, 1998
"An Embarrassment of Tyrannies: Twenty-Five Years of Index on Censorship," by George Braziller. W.L Webb and Rose Bell. 347 pages. $30.In 1972, Index on Censorship published its first issuprotesting Soviet show trials of dissidents Larisa Daniel and Pavel Litvinov. With this volume, editors W.L. Webb and Rose Bell offer a stunning anthology of 65 selections that not only celebrates the magazine, but provides a history of censorship, repression and resistance around the globe. Poems, short stories, polemics, narratives, interviews and analyses mix freely in this kaleidoscopic chronology.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | February 14, 1991
Paris. One thing that should be said for journalists in the Persian Gulf is that if the war should go badly, nobody can blame them. This indeed is no Vietnam. It is the most heavily censored war the United States has ever conducted.The censorship is largely indirect, and works by limiting journalists' access to the military, and to the scenes of action, and by supervising all contacts between reporters and military personnel.It is essentially a political censorship. Military security offers no 22 serious problems.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | October 28, 1995
Councilman Carl Stokes was cruising along in his car and channel surfing on the radio when he heard the words of a song by the group Jodeci."I had her legs in the air," went the lyrics. The lead singer then described the impact the woman had on a certain part of his anatomy. The phrase can't be repeated here because of that "family newspaper" thing.Stokes said he was so aghast he thought the music was being transmitted from one of the two newly discovered planets. He heard the raunchy lyrics about 4 p.m. The next day he continued to monitor the station and heard the same song shortly after 2 p.m.Monday, Stokes introduced a bill in the City Council that would establish a "task force on the cultural endangerment of youth."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Giuliano | April 5, 1991
'Body Leaks' Where: Fine Arts Center Mainstage Theatre, Towson State University.When: Tonight and Saturday at 8 p.m., Sunday at 3 p.m.Tickets: $16 tonight and Saturday, $12 Sunday; half-price for students, seniors, artists, TSU faculty, staff and alumni.Call: 830-ARTS.** 1/2 Ideas about self-censorship don't trickle from Omaha Magic Theatre's "Body Leaks," they pour out. Co-presented by the Theatre Project and Towson State University (at TSU), this multimedia piece often isn't very satisfying, but its moral fervor and savvy staging carry it along.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Daily News | October 21, 1993
Brandon Tartikoff, former network TV programmer and movie mogul, is greatly disturbed by what he perceives to be a burgeoning new era of censorship on America's television airwaves.Between all of the new projects stemming from his current incarnation as a TV megaproducer, Mr. Tartikoff -- the former president of NBC Entertainment and head of Paramount Pictures -- has been railing against the government's sudden preoccupation with TV violence.It smacks of self-serving hypocrisy to Mr. Tartikoff.
NEWS
December 27, 2011
Albert Einstein once said the reason he was able to accomplish so much was because he had "stood on the shoulders of giants" like Newton and Galileo. The Nobel Prize-winning physicist's remark was a reminder how much scientists depend on discoveries made by others. The system depends on the free and unfettered exchange of ideas, which is why the government's effort to restrict publication of research that it says could be used by terrorists has sparked a controversy over how to balance the need for openness against concerns that certain kinds of information might be misused.
EXPLORE
September 26, 2011
The editorial cartoon of Sept. 15 depicted Board of Education Chairwoman Janet Siddiqui banging the gavel at fellow school board member Allen Dyer.  However, the article about the Sept. 8 board meeting also revealed that Siddiqui was attempting to preemptively censor Dyer's speech.  Nothing in her duties as chairwoman authorizes her to censor the speech of another. She apparently feared that Dyer would impugn the law firm being discussed or release confidential information. At that time Dyer was speaking as an individual and not representing the whole board. If the law firm was impugned then they had recourse to seek relief from Dyer, not the whole board.
NEWS
September 9, 2010
In advance of Banned Books Week (Sept. 25-Oct. 2) I want to thank the often unheralded defenders of my First Amendment rights — librarians — who have quietly fought and continue to fight censorship. Large amounts of great literature have been banned at one time or another by self-appointed arbiters of the public morality — churches, school boards, censor boards, etc. — because these books have asked questions or described situations that made the rich and powerful uncomfortable or offended someone's sensibilities.
NEWS
January 20, 2010
Should American companies like Google refuse to do business in China if it means cooperating with that country's censorship laws? Yes 56% No 37% Not sure 7% (2,573 votes, results not scientific) Next poll: : Has President Barack Obama done a good job keeping his promises during his first year in office? Vote at baltimoresun.com/vote
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | November 28, 2009
Rosalyn Shecter, who headed Maryland's film censorship board during the contentious 1960s, died of heart disease Tuesday at the North Oaks retirement community. She was 95. Born Rosalyn Margareten in New York City, she was granddaughter of the woman who founded the Horowitz-Margareten matzo and kosher foods business. She attended Hunter College and later studied sculpture at the Maryland Institute College of Art. She met her future husband, Baltimore advertising executive Lois E. Shecter, in Miami Beach.
NEWS
April 6, 2009
U.S. Army upholds medical standards The Baltimore Sun's investigative article about military medicine contained omissions and inaccuracies from the headline to the end ("Untested in Battle," March 29). This article simply dismisses tens of thousands of real achievements over the past seven years. Badly injured men and women are alive today because of military medical treatment. The survival rate of service members injured in combat is 90 percent. This has been accomplished despite increasingly more destructive weapons wielded by an adaptive enemy and wounds unparalleled in civilian trauma medicine.
NEWS
By Peter Schrag | October 21, 1993
THIS year's survey of what the liberal organization People for the American Way describes as school censorship and "attacks on the freedom to learn" lists some familiar targets, from "Huck Finn" to "Catcher in the Rye" and "Lord of the Flies," from John Steinbeck to Maya Angelou, and contains the usual list of bizarre and occasionally troubling stories.Most of the attacks, the report says, come from right-wing groups, particularly the religious right, and involve attempts to remove books and abolish curriculum that they regard as too partial to witches or secular humanism, or too permissive about teen-age sex and gay lifestyles, or simply for being too realistic about adolescent life.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | February 13, 2004
CHICAGO - Censorship in America has a history that is long, voluminous and mortifying. In the 20th century, government agencies banned novels by everyone from Theodore Dreiser to James Joyce. Filmmakers were effectively discouraged from showing anything remotely erotic. Journalist H. L. Mencken was arrested after his magazine, American Mercury, published an article declaring that sex was no longer "a grim, serious and ominous business." But censorship is now a relic of our puritanical past.
NEWS
August 22, 2008
Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani was hailed as The Man after he cleaned up New York's Times Square by chasing out the seedy adult bookstores and X-rated theaters that blighted the area. But even Rudy might have been stumped by the Pack Shack, a Howard County smut shop that authorities have been trying to get rid of for years, and that keeps popping back like a Whack-a-Mole. The Pack Shack has thwarted every effort to shut it down. No one even knows who owns it. It's been to business development along Route 40 near Ellicott City what crab grass is to a golf green.
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