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Cemetery Ridge

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By Nicholas Prindle and Nicholas Prindle,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2004
The concluding event of the Gettysburg re-enactment highlights the fateful charge led by Confederate Maj. Gen. George Edward Pickett on the third and final day of the Gettysburg campaign. After a bombardment of the Union line on Cemetery Ridge with heavy artillery fire, about 15,000 men - including Pickett's entire division and a portion of A.P. Hill's corps - charged, and briefly breached, the first Union line. While many accounts of Pickett's Charge suggest a back-and-forth battle with victories and losses on either side, the words and deeds of Maj. Gen. Winfield Scott Hancock testify to a decisive Union victory that was never really in doubt.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2013
Confederate Gen. Lewis Addison Armistead, who was mortally wounded during Pickett's ill-fated charge at Gettysburg, sleeps away the ages in a quiet Baltimore cemetery. And how he came to spend eternity here is somewhat of a mystery. Armistead was appointed to West Point in 1934, but was dismissed after breaking a plate over the head of Jubal A. Early, who later became a Confederate lieutenant general and also fought at Gettysburg. He was commissioned a second lieutenant in the 6th U.S. Infantry in 1839 and fought in the Mexican War, where he was promoted to brevet rank of captain for gallantry.
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NEWS
By Michael Casey and Michael Casey,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 23, 2002
A Confederate plan to take the high ground behind Union lines was thwarted at Cress' Ridge on July 3, 1863, and raised the reputation of the "boy general," George Armstrong Custer, by his Charge of the Wolverines, so named because Custer commanded Michigan cavalry regiments, and residents of that state, nicknamed the Wolverine State, found themselves known as "Wolverines." Clever Union anticipation of the maneuver and key mistakes by Confederate commanders, resulted in a defeat of Maj. Gen. J.E.B.
NEWS
By Tiffany Vallo and Tiffany Vallo,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2005
In the early morning of July 3, 1863, Maj. Gen. George E. Pickett, who had been assigned to defenses at Richmond, Va., and his troops received orders to engage the Union army and break their front at Gettysburg. By afternoon they returned to the Confederate lines on Seminary Ridge a broken division. The charge, which barely lasted 50 minutes, has been studied and mythicized in the years since the Battle of Gettysburg and has become popularly known as "Pickett's Charge," according to John Heiser, a historian and ranger at the Gettysburg National Park in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
By Joseph Esposito and Joseph Esposito,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2003
Southern hopes for victory at Gettysburg were dashed when Pickett's Charge on July 3, 1863, failed to break the Union army's hold on Cemetery Ridge. Maj. Gen. George E. Pickett's division consisted of brigades commanded by Brig. Gen. Richard B. Garnett, Brig. Gen. James Lawson Kemper and Brig. Gen. Lewis A. Armistead. These three men would lead this charge into well-defended Union territory and into American history. In the morning, Pickett's division marched across Spangler's Woods and formed a battle line east of the woods in the open space behind Seminary Ridge.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2013
Confederate Gen. Lewis Addison Armistead, who was mortally wounded during Pickett's ill-fated charge at Gettysburg, sleeps away the ages in a quiet Baltimore cemetery. And how he came to spend eternity here is somewhat of a mystery. Armistead was appointed to West Point in 1934, but was dismissed after breaking a plate over the head of Jubal A. Early, who later became a Confederate lieutenant general and also fought at Gettysburg. He was commissioned a second lieutenant in the 6th U.S. Infantry in 1839 and fought in the Mexican War, where he was promoted to brevet rank of captain for gallantry.
NEWS
By Devon Fink and Devon Fink,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2004
The Union army's 11th Corps, also known as "The German Corps," was routed with heavy casualties on the first day of fighting at Gettysburg. This defeat continued what by that time was becoming an unfortunate tradition. The 11th Corps was formed Sept. 12, 1862, under the command of Maj. Gen. Franz Sigel, a German immigrant who was popular because the corps had a high percentage of German-speaking units. Sigel relinquished the command in February 1863 because of poor health, and Maj. Gen. Oliver O. Howard became its commander during the months preceding the battle at Gettysburg.
NEWS
By Stacy Malyil and Stacy Malyil,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 23, 2002
The Battle of Gettysburg turned the tide of the Civil War, and Pickett's Charge on July 3, 1863, proved to be the climactic clash of that battle. Spearheading this frontal assault on the Union line on Cemetery Ridge was Brig. Gen. Lewis A. Armistead's brigade, which crossed into history and legend as it crossed the angle of a stone wall protecting the Union troops atop the ridge, and plowed into Union forces under Brig. Gen. Alexander S. Webb, whose brigade did not have a strong hold on the position.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | December 5, 1998
GETTYSBURG, Pa. -- A group of police officers from around the region came to this historic site yesterday, trying to learn lessons from the monumental battle to make their streets safer.The 25 officers looking up at Culp's Hill and peering down from Little Round Top were students in the Johns Hopkins University's Police Executive Leadership Program whose director, Sheldon F. Greenberg, brought them to Gettysburg to demonstrate that the principles of leadership apply across the years."Everything we try to teach in our classes about leadership happened in that battle," said Greenberg, a former Howard County police officer who went on to get a doctorate in management.
NEWS
By Meaghan C. Ginnetty and Meaghan C. Ginnetty,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2004
When Union Maj. Gen. Governor K. Warren set off in the direction of a "little hill" on July 2, 1863, he never knew that he would be riding to a small, but prominent place in United States history. He was following the orders of Maj. Gen. George G. Meade, the newly appointed overall commander of the Army of the Potomac, who had become concerned when he heard "a little peppering going on in the direction of the little hill off yonder," according to Warren's aide, Lt. Washington A. Roebling.
NEWS
By Meaghan C. Ginnetty and Meaghan C. Ginnetty,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2004
When Union Maj. Gen. Governor K. Warren set off in the direction of a "little hill" on July 2, 1863, he never knew that he would be riding to a small, but prominent place in United States history. He was following the orders of Maj. Gen. George G. Meade, the newly appointed overall commander of the Army of the Potomac, who had become concerned when he heard "a little peppering going on in the direction of the little hill off yonder," according to Warren's aide, Lt. Washington A. Roebling.
NEWS
By Kristen Hampton and Kristen Hampton,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2004
As the sun rose on the morning of July 3, 1863, the Confederates at the Battle of Gettysburg were completing a plan of attack on the Union army. Gen. Robert E. Lee intended that the Confederate attack would strike at the center of the Union line on Cemetery Ridge, followed with reinforcements to break through and work their way in, with hopes of reducing Union batteries. The goal of the extensive artillery barrage before the assault was to cause heavy damage to the surrounding infantry and to reach the rear of the Union defense.
NEWS
By Michael Hilt and Michael Hilt,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2004
"My advance reached Gettysburg July 2, just in time to thwart a move of the enemy's cavalry upon our rear by way of Hunterstown after a fierce engagement, in which [Brig. Gen. Wade] Hampton's brigade performed gallant service, a series of charges compelling the enemy to leave the field and abandon his purpose. I took my position that day on the York and Heidlersburg roads, on the left wing of the Army of Northern Virginia," stated Maj. Gen. James Ewell Brown (J.E.B.) Stuart in his official report of the battle of Gettysburg.
NEWS
By Nicholas Prindle and Nicholas Prindle,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2004
The concluding event of the Gettysburg re-enactment highlights the fateful charge led by Confederate Maj. Gen. George Edward Pickett on the third and final day of the Gettysburg campaign. After a bombardment of the Union line on Cemetery Ridge with heavy artillery fire, about 15,000 men - including Pickett's entire division and a portion of A.P. Hill's corps - charged, and briefly breached, the first Union line. While many accounts of Pickett's Charge suggest a back-and-forth battle with victories and losses on either side, the words and deeds of Maj. Gen. Winfield Scott Hancock testify to a decisive Union victory that was never really in doubt.
NEWS
By Devon Fink and Devon Fink,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2004
The Union army's 11th Corps, also known as "The German Corps," was routed with heavy casualties on the first day of fighting at Gettysburg. This defeat continued what by that time was becoming an unfortunate tradition. The 11th Corps was formed Sept. 12, 1862, under the command of Maj. Gen. Franz Sigel, a German immigrant who was popular because the corps had a high percentage of German-speaking units. Sigel relinquished the command in February 1863 because of poor health, and Maj. Gen. Oliver O. Howard became its commander during the months preceding the battle at Gettysburg.
NEWS
By Jennifer Pesonen and Jennifer Pesonen,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2003
It is usually believed that cavalry played a very minor role in the Gettysburg campaign, but nothing could be further from the truth. According to Edward G. Longacre's book The Cavalry at Gettysburg, published in 1986, the brigades led by Confederate Maj. Gen. J.E.B. Stuart and those of the Union's Brig. Gen. David McMurtie Gregg would take part in "one of the largest and most influential mounted battles ever waged in the Western Hemisphere." In the early morning of July 3, Stuart and Gregg eased their men into position.
NEWS
By Tiffany Vallo and Tiffany Vallo,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2005
In the early morning of July 3, 1863, Maj. Gen. George E. Pickett, who had been assigned to defenses at Richmond, Va., and his troops received orders to engage the Union army and break their front at Gettysburg. By afternoon they returned to the Confederate lines on Seminary Ridge a broken division. The charge, which barely lasted 50 minutes, has been studied and mythicized in the years since the Battle of Gettysburg and has become popularly known as "Pickett's Charge," according to John Heiser, a historian and ranger at the Gettysburg National Park in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
By Kristen Hampton and Kristen Hampton,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2004
As the sun rose on the morning of July 3, 1863, the Confederates at the Battle of Gettysburg were completing a plan of attack on the Union army. Gen. Robert E. Lee intended that the Confederate attack would strike at the center of the Union line on Cemetery Ridge, followed with reinforcements to break through and work their way in, with hopes of reducing Union batteries. The goal of the extensive artillery barrage before the assault was to cause heavy damage to the surrounding infantry and to reach the rear of the Union defense.
NEWS
By Joseph Esposito and Joseph Esposito,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2003
Southern hopes for victory at Gettysburg were dashed when Pickett's Charge on July 3, 1863, failed to break the Union army's hold on Cemetery Ridge. Maj. Gen. George E. Pickett's division consisted of brigades commanded by Brig. Gen. Richard B. Garnett, Brig. Gen. James Lawson Kemper and Brig. Gen. Lewis A. Armistead. These three men would lead this charge into well-defended Union territory and into American history. In the morning, Pickett's division marched across Spangler's Woods and formed a battle line east of the woods in the open space behind Seminary Ridge.
NEWS
By Michael Casey and Michael Casey,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 23, 2002
A Confederate plan to take the high ground behind Union lines was thwarted at Cress' Ridge on July 3, 1863, and raised the reputation of the "boy general," George Armstrong Custer, by his Charge of the Wolverines, so named because Custer commanded Michigan cavalry regiments, and residents of that state, nicknamed the Wolverine State, found themselves known as "Wolverines." Clever Union anticipation of the maneuver and key mistakes by Confederate commanders, resulted in a defeat of Maj. Gen. J.E.B.
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