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Cemetery Hill

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By CHRISTOPHER BAMBURY and CHRISTOPHER BAMBURY,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 25, 2000
The attack by the Louisiana Tigers brigade on Cemetery Hill, which briefly overran several Union artillery positions on the second day of the fighting at Gettysburg, Pa., in July 1863, will be portrayed in this year's remembrance of that great Civil War battle. The re-enactment of this fighting will be held on Sunday, July 2. The first day of the Battle of Gettysburg was over, a smashing victory for the Confederates under the leadership of Gen. Robert E. Lee, and an unflattering Union defeat.
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NEWS
By Devon Fink and Devon Fink,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2004
The Union army's 11th Corps, also known as "The German Corps," was routed with heavy casualties on the first day of fighting at Gettysburg. This defeat continued what by that time was becoming an unfortunate tradition. The 11th Corps was formed Sept. 12, 1862, under the command of Maj. Gen. Franz Sigel, a German immigrant who was popular because the corps had a high percentage of German-speaking units. Sigel relinquished the command in February 1863 because of poor health, and Maj. Gen. Oliver O. Howard became its commander during the months preceding the battle at Gettysburg.
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NEWS
September 19, 1999
A correspondent of the New York Herald furnishes the following interesting account of the desperate battle at Gettysburg on Thursday last: The Position of the Rebels. General Reynolds, it seems more and more clear, fought rashly on Wednesday, and very probably against the wishes of the commander of the army; yet this battle, which lost us many men, gave us full information of the whereabouts of the enemy's main body, and committed the enemy to the position north of Gettysburg, or perhaps led him to believe that we had a greater force in his front than we had, and so made him fear to make any such considerable movement as would be necessary to take up a new position in presence of this army.
NEWS
By Nick Alexopulos and Nick Alexopulos,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2003
The reorganized Union brigades of the 11th Corps stood at the curve of the army's fishhook formation on East Cemetery Hill just south of Gettysburg when dusk fell on the night of July 2, 1863. Those Union soldiers faced the task of defending their position on Cemetery Hill's eastern slope, steep and lined with stone walls at its base and peak, from the first wave of Confederate troops that attacked under orders to take the high ground. Both armies understood the importance of victory in this first clash on Cemetery Hill and the implications it had for victory at Gettysburg.
NEWS
June 25, 2000
A correspondent of the New York Herald furnishes the following interesting account of the desperate battle at Gettysburg on Thursday last: The Position of the Rebels. General Reynolds, it seems more and more clear, fought rashly on Wednesday, and very probably against the wishes of the commander of the army; yet this battle, which lost us many men, gave us full information of the where-abouts of the enemy's main body, and committed the enemy to the position north of Gettysburg, or perhaps led him to believe that we had a greater force in his front than we had, and so made him fear to make any such considerable movement as would be necessary to take up a new position in presence of this army.
NEWS
By Devon Fink and Devon Fink,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2004
The Union army's 11th Corps, also known as "The German Corps," was routed with heavy casualties on the first day of fighting at Gettysburg. This defeat continued what by that time was becoming an unfortunate tradition. The 11th Corps was formed Sept. 12, 1862, under the command of Maj. Gen. Franz Sigel, a German immigrant who was popular because the corps had a high percentage of German-speaking units. Sigel relinquished the command in February 1863 because of poor health, and Maj. Gen. Oliver O. Howard became its commander during the months preceding the battle at Gettysburg.
NEWS
By Paul Ruppel and Paul Ruppel,Special to the Sun | July 1, 1999
An often overlooked aspect of the Battle of Gettysburg was the critical fighting on the northern side of the famous "hook-shaped" Union line. The tactical importance of Culp's Hill and the defense of the right side flank movement by Confederate Lt. Gen. Richard S. Ewell were critical to the defense of the Union's position and victory at Gettysburg.After the 1st and 11th Corps of the Army of the Potomac were pushed back through the streets of Gettysburg, Maj. Gen. Oliver O. Howard attempted to rally the Union forces on Cemetery Hill just south of town.
NEWS
By Nick Alexopulos and Nick Alexopulos,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2003
The reorganized Union brigades of the 11th Corps stood at the curve of the army's fishhook formation on East Cemetery Hill just south of Gettysburg when dusk fell on the night of July 2, 1863. Those Union soldiers faced the task of defending their position on Cemetery Hill's eastern slope, steep and lined with stone walls at its base and peak, from the first wave of Confederate troops that attacked under orders to take the high ground. Both armies understood the importance of victory in this first clash on Cemetery Hill and the implications it had for victory at Gettysburg.
NEWS
June 28, 2003
On Thursday, June 26, 2003, DOROTHY AARONSON, devoted sister of Yale and Harry Aaronson and the late Jack and William Aaronson. Also survived by loving nieces and nephews. Services and Interment were held on Friday, June 27, 2003 at the Beth Isaac Adath Israel Congregation Cemetery, German Hill Rd. Please omit flowers. Arrangements by SOL LEVINSON & BROS. INC.
NEWS
December 6, 2005
On December 2, 2005, JOSEPH JAKIELSKI, age 76, of Bel Air, MD, formerly of Baltimore; dear uncle, great uncle and cousin of the Jakielski and Kalthof families and dear friend of many. Interment of Cremated Remains will be held on Monday, December 26, 10 A.M. in Holy Roasary Cemetery, Germen Hill Road, Baltimore.
NEWS
June 25, 2000
A correspondent of the New York Herald furnishes the following interesting account of the desperate battle at Gettysburg on Thursday last: The Position of the Rebels. General Reynolds, it seems more and more clear, fought rashly on Wednesday, and very probably against the wishes of the commander of the army; yet this battle, which lost us many men, gave us full information of the where-abouts of the enemy's main body, and committed the enemy to the position north of Gettysburg, or perhaps led him to believe that we had a greater force in his front than we had, and so made him fear to make any such considerable movement as would be necessary to take up a new position in presence of this army.
NEWS
By CHRISTOPHER BAMBURY and CHRISTOPHER BAMBURY,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 25, 2000
The attack by the Louisiana Tigers brigade on Cemetery Hill, which briefly overran several Union artillery positions on the second day of the fighting at Gettysburg, Pa., in July 1863, will be portrayed in this year's remembrance of that great Civil War battle. The re-enactment of this fighting will be held on Sunday, July 2. The first day of the Battle of Gettysburg was over, a smashing victory for the Confederates under the leadership of Gen. Robert E. Lee, and an unflattering Union defeat.
NEWS
September 19, 1999
A correspondent of the New York Herald furnishes the following interesting account of the desperate battle at Gettysburg on Thursday last: The Position of the Rebels. General Reynolds, it seems more and more clear, fought rashly on Wednesday, and very probably against the wishes of the commander of the army; yet this battle, which lost us many men, gave us full information of the whereabouts of the enemy's main body, and committed the enemy to the position north of Gettysburg, or perhaps led him to believe that we had a greater force in his front than we had, and so made him fear to make any such considerable movement as would be necessary to take up a new position in presence of this army.
NEWS
By Paul Ruppel and Paul Ruppel,Special to the Sun | July 1, 1999
An often overlooked aspect of the Battle of Gettysburg was the critical fighting on the northern side of the famous "hook-shaped" Union line. The tactical importance of Culp's Hill and the defense of the right side flank movement by Confederate Lt. Gen. Richard S. Ewell were critical to the defense of the Union's position and victory at Gettysburg.After the 1st and 11th Corps of the Army of the Potomac were pushed back through the streets of Gettysburg, Maj. Gen. Oliver O. Howard attempted to rally the Union forces on Cemetery Hill just south of town.
NEWS
September 5, 2003
On August 29, 2003, WALTER A. DODA; beloved son of the late Walter and Eugenia Doda; loving brother of Florence Miller and her husband Stanley; dearest friend of Janet Fields; uncle of Larry and Joseph Miller and Julie Schoonover. Graveside services will be held at Holy Rosary Cemetery (German Hill Road), on Saturday, September 6, 2003 at 11 A.M.
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