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NEWS
By Bill Callen and Bill Callen,Special to The Carroll County Sun | February 12, 1992
Opponents of plans to burn hazardous waste in cement kilns urged lawmakers Saturday to derail the project until a study committee can determine if the process is safe.About 400 residents turned out at South Hagerstown High for a hearing on a bill by Rep. D. Bruce Poole, D-Washington, to put a statewide three-year ban on burning hazardous wastes in cement kilns. The bill proposes a state committee to study the issue.Testimony also was heard on a bill sponsored by Sens. Donald F. Munson, R-Washington, and John W. Derr, R-Frederick, to prohibit burning of hazardous wastes within a half-mile of populated areas.
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NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | December 16, 2001
The Lehigh Portland Cement Co. fired its towering new kiln for the first time about two weeks ago and so far, reviews of the impact on the surrounding communities of Union Bridge and New Windsor have been mixed. Residents and officials in Union Bridge seem pleased that the expanded plant creates less dust and noise than the old plant. But residents on the other side of the plant say it's too loud and casts a powerful glare at night that makes stargazing impossible. Lehigh began its $268 million expansion in 1999.
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NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff writer | March 1, 1992
A Union Bridge citizens coalition, fearful of a nearby cement plant's plans to burn hazardous waste as fuel, supported legislation Wednesday that would prohibit the activity.About 10 members of Residents for a Healthier Union Bridge Area testified before the House Environmental Matters Committee that incineration of hazardous wastes in cement kilns has not been proven safe and could cause pollution and health risks."This legislation is needed to protect the citizens of Maryland,"said Jacquelyn D. Loats of Westminster.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | December 16, 2001
The Lehigh Portland Cement Co. fired its towering new kiln for the first time about two weeks ago and so far, reviews of the impact on the surrounding communities of Union Bridge and New Windsor have been mixed. Residents and officials in Union Bridge seem pleased that the expanded plant creates less dust and noise than the old plant. But residents on the other side of the plant say it's too loud and casts a powerful glare at night that makes stargazing impossible. Lehigh began its $268 million expansion in 1999.
NEWS
By CARROLL COUNTY SUN GRAPHIC | October 20, 1991
If the Lehigh Portland Cement Co. burns carbon wastes in its kilns, it would not pose a danger to the environment because the amount of metals emitted would be low, a University of Maryland professor said."
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff writer | May 5, 1991
Don't let a cement company's plans to burn hazardous waste divide the town, a Washington consultant told residents last week."It's a small town and a beautiful area. You shouldn't get divided," said Edward W. Kleppinger, a former chemistry professor who opposes burning hazardous wastes in cement kilns."Please, folks, I go to so many communities, and I see people getting angry and upset. Don't do that. Work it out," he said.Kleppinger, who now works as an environmental consultant for industry, spoke to about 60 people Wednesday night at the Union Bridge Community Center.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Sun Staff Writer | February 23, 1994
ANNAPOLIS -- A Carroll bill that would give the county recycling "credit" for old tires used as fuel in cement kilns probably will die in a House committee, a county delegate said yesterday.The Maryland Department of the Environment opposes the measure, which would be effective statewide.Using tires as a fuel substitute is a good practice, said Richard Collins, director of the department's Waste Management Administration."But it's not recycling. The Maryland Recycling Act defines recycling as returning a product to the marketplace," he said yesterday.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff writer | February 24, 1991
Instead of saying, "Not in my back yard," to a Lehigh Portland Cement Co. plan to burn potentially hazardous waste in its kilns, many of the town's 964 residents are saying, "Not in my state."Meanwhile,the Maryland Department of the Environment will conduct another public hearing at a time to be determined before deciding whether to approve Lehigh's request, said spokesman John Goheen.The MDE also is awaiting results of testing it performed at Ciba-Geigy, the New Jersey plant that produces the carbon waste Lehigh wants to burn.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Sun Staff Writer | April 10, 1995
Lehigh Portland Cement Co. will begin testing equipment on one of four cement kilns next month for its tire burning project at the company's Union Bridge plant.The project, in the works for two years, is an attempt to burn scrap tires as fuel in the kilns instead of coal. The company hopes to replace 18 percent of its coal fuel with burned tires."The idea is to burn tires, which have high heat value, in place of some of the coal," said David Roush, Lehigh's plant manager.Beginning in late May, Lehigh plans to install equipment on one of its four cement kilns that will allow for the introduction of whole tires.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | June 8, 1995
The first of what could eventually be more than 2 million tires a year were burned by Lehigh Portland Cement Co. this week as the Union Bridge plant began testing its $1.5 million tires-as-fuel project.In the works for two years, the project is expected to allow Lehigh to reduce its use of coal by as much as 18 percent, company officials have said.It eventually would involve four cement kilns powered by the heat generated from the burning tires.If successful, this week's testing would lead to the completion of three more cement kilns next year that can be powered by burning tires, officials said.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | June 8, 1995
The first of what could eventually be more than 2 million tires a year were burned by Lehigh Portland Cement Co. this week as the Union Bridge plant began testing its $1.5 million tires-as-fuel project.In the works for two years, the project is expected to allow Lehigh to reduce its use of coal by as much as 18 percent, company officials have said.It eventually would involve four cement kilns powered by the heat generated from the burning tires.If successful, this week's testing would lead to the completion of three more cement kilns next year that can be powered by burning tires, officials said.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Sun Staff Writer | April 10, 1995
Lehigh Portland Cement Co. will begin testing equipment on one of four cement kilns next month for its tire burning project at the company's Union Bridge plant.The project, in the works for two years, is an attempt to burn scrap tires as fuel in the kilns instead of coal. The company hopes to replace 18 percent of its coal fuel with burned tires."The idea is to burn tires, which have high heat value, in place of some of the coal," said David Roush, Lehigh's plant manager.Beginning in late May, Lehigh plans to install equipment on one of its four cement kilns that will allow for the introduction of whole tires.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Sun Staff Writer | February 23, 1994
ANNAPOLIS -- A Carroll bill that would give the county recycling "credit" for old tires used as fuel in cement kilns probably will die in a House committee, a county delegate said yesterday.The Maryland Department of the Environment opposes the measure, which would be effective statewide.Using tires as a fuel substitute is a good practice, said Richard Collins, director of the department's Waste Management Administration."But it's not recycling. The Maryland Recycling Act defines recycling as returning a product to the marketplace," he said yesterday.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | July 19, 1992
UNION BRIDGE -- Burning tires as a fuel in cement kilns can be done safely and without creating toxic emissions, two experts said.The practice -- which Lehigh Portland Cement Co. hopes to start next summer -- provides a cheap fuel and is an ideal way to dispose of the 4.5 million used tires generated in Maryland every year, proponents and state officials said.Lehigh announced Thursday it will apply to the state this week to burn 2 million tires a year in its four kilns to reduce fuel costs.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff writer | March 1, 1992
A Union Bridge citizens coalition, fearful of a nearby cement plant's plans to burn hazardous waste as fuel, supported legislation Wednesday that would prohibit the activity.About 10 members of Residents for a Healthier Union Bridge Area testified before the House Environmental Matters Committee that incineration of hazardous wastes in cement kilns has not been proven safe and could cause pollution and health risks."This legislation is needed to protect the citizens of Maryland,"said Jacquelyn D. Loats of Westminster.
NEWS
February 23, 1992
From: Deborah M. DoxzonResidents for a HealthierUnion BridgeHaving attended a public hearing sponsored by theWashington County delegation on Feb. 8, I feel it imperative for citizens and elected officials in counties neighboring Carroll County and Washington County to familiarize themselves with two pieces of legislation which will have a tremendous impact on the burning of hazardous waste in Maryland.House Bill 1227 places a three-year moratorium on the burning of hazardous waste in cement kilns.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | July 19, 1992
UNION BRIDGE -- Burning tires as a fuel in cement kilns can be done safely and without creating toxic emissions, two experts said.The practice -- which Lehigh Portland Cement Co. hopes to start next summer -- provides a cheap fuel and is an ideal way to dispose of the 4.5 million used tires generated in Maryland every year, proponents and state officials said.Lehigh announced Thursday it will apply to the state this week to burn 2 million tires a year in its four kilns to reduce fuel costs.
NEWS
February 23, 1992
From: Deborah M. DoxzonResidents for a HealthierUnion BridgeHaving attended a public hearing sponsored by theWashington County delegation on Feb. 8, I feel it imperative for citizens and elected officials in counties neighboring Carroll County and Washington County to familiarize themselves with two pieces of legislation which will have a tremendous impact on the burning of hazardous waste in Maryland.House Bill 1227 places a three-year moratorium on the burning of hazardous waste in cement kilns.
NEWS
By Bill Callen and Bill Callen,Special to The Carroll County Sun | February 12, 1992
Opponents of plans to burn hazardous waste in cement kilns urged lawmakers Saturday to derail the project until a study committee can determine if the process is safe.About 400 residents turned out at South Hagerstown High for a hearing on a bill by Rep. D. Bruce Poole, D-Washington, to put a statewide three-year ban on burning hazardous wastes in cement kilns. The bill proposes a state committee to study the issue.Testimony also was heard on a bill sponsored by Sens. Donald F. Munson, R-Washington, and John W. Derr, R-Frederick, to prohibit burning of hazardous wastes within a half-mile of populated areas.
NEWS
By CARROLL COUNTY SUN GRAPHIC | October 20, 1991
If the Lehigh Portland Cement Co. burns carbon wastes in its kilns, it would not pose a danger to the environment because the amount of metals emitted would be low, a University of Maryland professor said."
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