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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | March 11, 1995
Just in time for St. Patrick's Day, Fiona Ritchie has finally arrived in Baltimore -- on the radio, that is."The Thistle & Shamrock," Ms. Ritchie's weekly dose of lilting Celtic music, began airing last weekend on WJHU-FM (88.1), and can be heard at 8 p.m. Sundays. Tomorrow's edition features the music of Wales.Although on public radio stations across the country for 12 years and ranking as National Public Radio's most popular music offering, the hourlong show could previously be heard in this area only on Washington's WAMU-FM (88.5)
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NEWS
May 17, 2013
Sunday, May 19 Chamber music The Sundays at Three Chamber Music Series presents Duo Amaral at 3 p.m. at Christ Episcopal Church, 6800 Oakland Mills Rd. in Columbia. The duo will perform music by Scarlatti, Sammartini, Handel, Vivaldi, Franck and Rodrigo, written or arranged for two guitars. Tickets are $15 and free for those 17 and younger accompanied by a paying adult. Information: 443-288-3179 or sundaysatthree.org. Cookbook author appears Chabad of Clarksville and the Jewish Federation of Howard County host an evening with Joanne Caras, creator of the "Holocaust Survivor Cookbook" and "Miracles & Meals" cookbook, at 7:30 p.m. at the River Hill Village Center, 6020 Daybreak Cir. in Clarksville.
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By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2011
On a misty afternoon, the vista beyond her windows — the peaceful West River, lashed to life by a brisk and sudden rain — might as well be the Galway Bay of song or a fog-shrouded inlet of the Irish Sea. Such Celtic scenes lie 3,000 miles to the east, but to Maggie Sansone, they feel no further away than a tune she can't shake from her mind. "Sometimes I look out there and think, 'Those are the same waters that reach out and touch Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man," says Sansone, a Shady Side resident who happens to be one of America's top performers on the hammered dulcimer, an instrument that dates back 2,000 years and can — in the right hands — make sounds as primeval as haze on a lonely moor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2012
It's been a very good couple of days for CBS journalist Bob Schieffer. He had the first interview with the Romney-Ryan ticket in the Sunday night showcase of "60 Minutes"and handled it well. And then, it was announced Monday that he would be one of the four moderators of presidential and vice presidential debates this fall along with Jim Lehrer (PBS), Candy Crowley (CNN) and Martha Raddatz (ABC). No one's happier to see Schieffer making news than me, because it gives me a second chance to write about an interview I had with him last month and something he said.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | March 17, 2000
Like green beer, paper shamrocks and cartoon leprechauns, Irish music has long been a part of St. Patrick's Day here in the United States. For many, St. Patrick's Day without music would be like cabbage without corned beef. But the kind of music we associate with the wearin' of the green is changing. Where once Irish Americans hankered for sweet-voiced tenors crooning "Come Back to Erin," "Mother Machree" and "When Irish Eyes Are Smiling," today's revelers would as soon hear the uilleann pipes and fiddles laying into a set of jigs and reels.
NEWS
February 16, 2007
Celtic concert -- The 333 Coffeehouse will present Uncommonly Celtic at 8 p.m. today at the Annapolis Unitarian Universalist Church, 333 Dubois Road. This show will feature a mix of Celtic music and traditional instruments. The 333 Coffeehouse is a smoke-free, non-alcohol, environment that meets on the third Friday of every month. Tickets are $10 for adults, $5 for senior adults and students. 443-786-0463 or www.fsgw.org/333.
ENTERTAINMENT
By GENA R. CHATTIN | April 12, 2007
Country star Kathy Mattea has spent recent years experimenting with Celtic music and exploring her folk-music heritage, but one thing has remained constant in her 20-year career: her talent for performing well-written songs. Mattea's latest project is an acoustic, "roots-oriented" tribute to the music of the coal-mining era a century ago and to those who have worked in the mines. Mattea takes the stage at 8 p.m. Wednesday and April 19 at the Barns at Wolf Trap, 1635 Trap Road, Vienna, Va. Tickets are $35. Call 410-481-6500 or 800-955-5566, or go to wolftrap.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2010
Diane Y. Daugherty, a retired Baltimore County special education teacher, died Sept. 20 of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at St. Joseph Medical Center. She was 76. Diane Young, the daughter of a General Motors executive and a homemaker, was born in Hope, Ind., and was raised in Anderson, Ind., and Plainfield, N.J. After graduating from Plainfield High School in 1951, she earned a bachelor's degree in home economics from the University of Maryland, College Park. She also did graduate work in education at Loyola College and what is now Towson University.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 17, 1994
Because much of it is sold around St. Patrick's Day, many Americans think of Irish music strictly as holiday fare, like carols at Christmas or Sousa marches on the Fourth of July.After all, how could green beer taste authentic without "When Irish Eyes Are Smiling" playing in the background?That's not the way the Irish look at it, of course.But then, Tin Pan Alley tripe like "A Little Bit of Heaven (Sure They Call It Ireland)" is no closer to real Irish music than green-dyed Miller is to Guinness draught.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kim Hart and Kim Hart,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2005
The six women of the Irish-American band Cherish the Ladies learned long ago to celebrate their Celtic roots. Little did they know that growing up dancing jaunty jigs and belting out familiar tunes around each of their families' crowded dinner tables would be the start of sharing Irish music with the world. This weekend, the Meyerhoff's spotlight illuminates the rich traditions of the Emerald Isle with performances combining the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra with the all-female Irish-American band that has become one of the most successful acts in Celtic music history.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2011
On a misty afternoon, the vista beyond her windows — the peaceful West River, lashed to life by a brisk and sudden rain — might as well be the Galway Bay of song or a fog-shrouded inlet of the Irish Sea. Such Celtic scenes lie 3,000 miles to the east, but to Maggie Sansone, they feel no further away than a tune she can't shake from her mind. "Sometimes I look out there and think, 'Those are the same waters that reach out and touch Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man," says Sansone, a Shady Side resident who happens to be one of America's top performers on the hammered dulcimer, an instrument that dates back 2,000 years and can — in the right hands — make sounds as primeval as haze on a lonely moor.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2010
Diane Y. Daugherty, a retired Baltimore County special education teacher, died Sept. 20 of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at St. Joseph Medical Center. She was 76. Diane Young, the daughter of a General Motors executive and a homemaker, was born in Hope, Ind., and was raised in Anderson, Ind., and Plainfield, N.J. After graduating from Plainfield High School in 1951, she earned a bachelor's degree in home economics from the University of Maryland, College Park. She also did graduate work in education at Loyola College and what is now Towson University.
NEWS
January 6, 2008
Town Center Community Association will offer Sunday Afternoon Tea from 2:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. Jan. 20 at Historic Oakland, 5430 Vantage Point Road. Hot tea will be served in the manor's elegant ballroom. Sandwiches, desserts and warm scones will also be served. A live performance by the Celtic music trio Painted Trillium is planned. The cost is $20. Reservations are required at least two business days in advance. Information or reservations: 410-730-4801 or www.historicoakland.com. Around town Mah-jongg -- Those ages 18 or older are invited to Slayton House in Wilde Lake Village Center for mah-jongg at 10 a.m. Wednesdays.
ENTERTAINMENT
By GENA R. CHATTIN | April 12, 2007
Country star Kathy Mattea has spent recent years experimenting with Celtic music and exploring her folk-music heritage, but one thing has remained constant in her 20-year career: her talent for performing well-written songs. Mattea's latest project is an acoustic, "roots-oriented" tribute to the music of the coal-mining era a century ago and to those who have worked in the mines. Mattea takes the stage at 8 p.m. Wednesday and April 19 at the Barns at Wolf Trap, 1635 Trap Road, Vienna, Va. Tickets are $35. Call 410-481-6500 or 800-955-5566, or go to wolftrap.
NEWS
February 16, 2007
Celtic concert -- The 333 Coffeehouse will present Uncommonly Celtic at 8 p.m. today at the Annapolis Unitarian Universalist Church, 333 Dubois Road. This show will feature a mix of Celtic music and traditional instruments. The 333 Coffeehouse is a smoke-free, non-alcohol, environment that meets on the third Friday of every month. Tickets are $10 for adults, $5 for senior adults and students. 443-786-0463 or www.fsgw.org/333.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kim Hart and Kim Hart,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2005
The six women of the Irish-American band Cherish the Ladies learned long ago to celebrate their Celtic roots. Little did they know that growing up dancing jaunty jigs and belting out familiar tunes around each of their families' crowded dinner tables would be the start of sharing Irish music with the world. This weekend, the Meyerhoff's spotlight illuminates the rich traditions of the Emerald Isle with performances combining the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra with the all-female Irish-American band that has become one of the most successful acts in Celtic music history.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2012
It's been a very good couple of days for CBS journalist Bob Schieffer. He had the first interview with the Romney-Ryan ticket in the Sunday night showcase of "60 Minutes"and handled it well. And then, it was announced Monday that he would be one of the four moderators of presidential and vice presidential debates this fall along with Jim Lehrer (PBS), Candy Crowley (CNN) and Martha Raddatz (ABC). No one's happier to see Schieffer making news than me, because it gives me a second chance to write about an interview I had with him last month and something he said.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | May 30, 2002
Paul Michael Levin, an Irish pipe player who was a founder of the band O'Malley's March and an official of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County technology center, died Tuesday of a brain tumor at his parents' home in Pikesville. He was 51 and lived in Timonium. Mr. Levin was the second member of the popular six-member Irish band to die this year. Bass guitar player Robert Baum died of a stroke March 27. Born in Baltimore and raised in Howard Park and Pikesville, Mr. Levin was a 1968 graduate of McDonogh School.
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