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NEWS
November 11, 2005
Did you know? -- The sun's surface temperature is 5500 degrees Celsius (9932 degrees Fahrenheit).
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NEWS
March 23, 2009
Achy head? It could be the weather A variety of headache triggers are relatively well-known: red wine, chocolate, soft cheese and the beginning of the menstrual cycle. But although weather, especially changes in air pressure, is frequently cited as a headache trigger, the connection has not been shown in a large, well-designed study. Now researchers have found that high temperatures and low air pressure can indeed trigger migraines, but say there doesn't seem to be a clear association between such severe headaches and air pollution.
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NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2004
The Carroll County commissioners expect to decide soon on a plan to lower the temperature of treated water discharged from the county's wastewater treatment plant near Hampstead. The cost of correcting the temperature is estimated to cost as much as $2.2 million, Carroll Comptroller Eugene Curfman said. But until a specific remedy is chosen, he said the cost won't be known for sure. The commissioners voted unanimously last week to allow the county to incur the debt. Commissioner Julia Walsh Gouge, a former mayor of Hampstead, said the temperature of the water discharged into Piney Run is 1 to 1 1/2 degrees too high, on average, but nonetheless must be lowered.
NEWS
By Bryan K. Mignone | February 13, 2007
The unveiling of the latest scientific report on climate change in Paris this month dealt another blow to the few remaining groups opposed to mandatory limits on carbon emissions. The report, the fourth by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, concludes with 90 percent certainty - the highest yet - that the observed increase in global surface temperature over the past five decades is caused by the accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, primarily carbon dioxide produced from the burning of fossil fuels.
FEATURES
December 10, 1995
Forebears RememberedEditor: Your Oct. 22 story of a man's journey to the American Cemetery in Luxembourg to visit the grave of his brother, a World War II casualty, touched me deeply. Those who predecease us live on as long as we remember them. We do not have to visit their graves but when they are interred so far from home there is something special about making the effort.My great-grandfather, who served in the Civil War ... died in 1862, not of battle wounds but of what was called congestive fever, an epidemic of which had swept through camp.
NEWS
BY S. FRED SINGER | June 29, 1994
It's been a chilly spring, at least in the United States and Europe, and global warming seems far away. Nevertheless, governments have been gearing up to carry out the mandates of the Global Climate Treaty, trying to throttle the use of energy.The threat of a temperature rise of a couple of degrees Celsius -- if indeed it is a threat -- is based entirely on rather complicated calculations from a rather simple theory, namely that a build-up of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere from the burning of oil, gas and coal, will, like a blanket, retain more of the earth's heat, resulting in a warmer climate.
NEWS
March 23, 2009
Achy head? It could be the weather A variety of headache triggers are relatively well-known: red wine, chocolate, soft cheese and the beginning of the menstrual cycle. But although weather, especially changes in air pressure, is frequently cited as a headache trigger, the connection has not been shown in a large, well-designed study. Now researchers have found that high temperatures and low air pressure can indeed trigger migraines, but say there doesn't seem to be a clear association between such severe headaches and air pollution.
NEWS
By Bryan K. Mignone | February 13, 2007
The unveiling of the latest scientific report on climate change in Paris this month dealt another blow to the few remaining groups opposed to mandatory limits on carbon emissions. The report, the fourth by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, concludes with 90 percent certainty - the highest yet - that the observed increase in global surface temperature over the past five decades is caused by the accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, primarily carbon dioxide produced from the burning of fossil fuels.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2004
The state filed a complaint this week in Carroll County Circuit Court claiming that the discharge from the county's wastewater treatment plant in Hampstead exceeded temperature requirements 39 times this summer. Data collected last month weren't included. The plant discharges treated sewage, called effluent, into Piney Run, a stream whose name changes to Western Run in Baltimore County, where it feeds into Loch Raven Reservoir. The Maryland Department of the Environment requires the county to monitor the temperature of the effluent and to report any increase above 20 degrees Celsius (68 degrees Fahrenheit)
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2004
Out of options and facing stiff fines from the Maryland Department of the Environment, the Carroll County commissioners voted yesterday to spend nearly $2 million on equipment that will slightly lower the temperature of treated discharge from the Hampstead wastewater treatment plant. The county has "followed good science" in trying to address the seasonal temperature increases, which are rarely more than 1 degree, said James E. Slater, the county planning department's deputy director of environment and resource protection.
NEWS
November 11, 2005
Did you know? -- The sun's surface temperature is 5500 degrees Celsius (9932 degrees Fahrenheit).
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2004
Out of options and facing stiff fines from the Maryland Department of the Environment, the Carroll County commissioners voted yesterday to spend nearly $2 million on equipment that will slightly lower the temperature of treated discharge from the Hampstead wastewater treatment plant. The county has "followed good science" in trying to address the seasonal temperature increases, which are rarely more than 1 degree, said James E. Slater, the county planning department's deputy director of environment and resource protection.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2004
The Carroll County commissioners expect to decide soon on a plan to lower the temperature of treated water discharged from the county's wastewater treatment plant near Hampstead. The cost of correcting the temperature is estimated to cost as much as $2.2 million, Carroll Comptroller Eugene Curfman said. But until a specific remedy is chosen, he said the cost won't be known for sure. The commissioners voted unanimously last week to allow the county to incur the debt. Commissioner Julia Walsh Gouge, a former mayor of Hampstead, said the temperature of the water discharged into Piney Run is 1 to 1 1/2 degrees too high, on average, but nonetheless must be lowered.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2004
The state filed a complaint this week in Carroll County Circuit Court claiming that the discharge from the county's wastewater treatment plant in Hampstead exceeded temperature requirements 39 times this summer. Data collected last month weren't included. The plant discharges treated sewage, called effluent, into Piney Run, a stream whose name changes to Western Run in Baltimore County, where it feeds into Loch Raven Reservoir. The Maryland Department of the Environment requires the county to monitor the temperature of the effluent and to report any increase above 20 degrees Celsius (68 degrees Fahrenheit)
FEATURES
December 10, 1995
Forebears RememberedEditor: Your Oct. 22 story of a man's journey to the American Cemetery in Luxembourg to visit the grave of his brother, a World War II casualty, touched me deeply. Those who predecease us live on as long as we remember them. We do not have to visit their graves but when they are interred so far from home there is something special about making the effort.My great-grandfather, who served in the Civil War ... died in 1862, not of battle wounds but of what was called congestive fever, an epidemic of which had swept through camp.
NEWS
BY S. FRED SINGER | June 29, 1994
It's been a chilly spring, at least in the United States and Europe, and global warming seems far away. Nevertheless, governments have been gearing up to carry out the mandates of the Global Climate Treaty, trying to throttle the use of energy.The threat of a temperature rise of a couple of degrees Celsius -- if indeed it is a threat -- is based entirely on rather complicated calculations from a rather simple theory, namely that a build-up of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere from the burning of oil, gas and coal, will, like a blanket, retain more of the earth's heat, resulting in a warmer climate.
NEWS
December 6, 2000
Do you know? Does the arctic fox shiver? Answer: The fox is very comfortable in the cold and only starts shivering at minus 70 degrees Celsius. Learn more! Visit the arctic foxes at The Baltimore Zoo. Read "Ice Bear and Little Fox" by Jonathan London. WILD FACTS 1. Artic Foxes have small ears to reduce heat loss. 2. Another heat saver? The arctic fos has warm, furry feet in winter. Furry feet also help the fox to keep from slipping on snow and ice. THE BALTIMORE ZOO
SPORTS
October 16, 1997
Status: Day 25, Leg 1Standings:Boat .. .. .. .. .. ...Nautical miles to finish1. EF Language .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .1,669.42. Merit Cup .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 1,766.23. Innovation Kvaerner .. .. .. .. .. ..1,779.84. Silk Cut .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .1,970.15. Chessie Racing .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .2,087.66. America's Challenge .. .. .. .. .. ..2,216.07. Toshiba .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..2,229.48. Swedish Match .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..2,271.79. EF Education .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ...2,532.
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