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Cellular Phones

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By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Sun Fashion Editor | March 2, 1995
Hello fashion! We're talking cellular phones which, like shiny Prada backpacks, have become the obligatory accessory on the fashion circuit. You see models giggling into them as they curl up in corners between runway shows. You see stylists screeching orders. You see ladies who lunch call for their drivers.At the New York designer collections, where everyone is so important and very busy going about the business of fashion, the little talkies are as ubiquitous as Chanel lipsticks, so much so that buyers and press packed into the big tent shows are exhorted to shut down their cellulars to clear the air for security reasons.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2014
Four gunman wearing masks robbed several employees of a popular Federal Hill sports bar early Sunday, Baltimore police said. Armed with handguns, the men entered Mother's Federal Hill Grille in the 1100 S. Charles St. around 6:30 a.m. and robbed employees of their wallets, cellular phones and cash. The suspects then fled the scene, Baltimore police said. "The four of us were pistol-whipped, and they took just personal items," said Kelly Rather, who co-owns the large bar and restaurant with her husband, Dave Rather, and his brother Adam Rather.
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BUSINESS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,New York Bureau | April 4, 1993
New York --Long seen as a luxury for harried Wall Street brokers and Hollywood wannabes, the cellular phone is recasting its image as -- of all things -- a vital economic link for developing countries.About 60 countries have gone cellular, including 15 developing countries last year, when new technology and foreign investment pushed cellular phones into Zaire, Laos, Hungary and Bolivia. Today, such phones have become crucial connections between village and capital, remote mine and rescue service.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | May 2, 2012
The case before the Maryland Court of Appeals is straightforward. Detectives in Montgomery County got a warrant to intercept cell phone calls of a suspected drug dealer. They caught him in the act and made an arrest, finding marijuana in his suitcase. A jury convicted the man and he was sentenced to five years in prison. But he argued that the cops exceeded their authority. The telephone conversation the cops picked up was placed in Virginia, and was made to another man in another state.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2014
Four gunman wearing masks robbed several employees of a popular Federal Hill sports bar early Sunday, Baltimore police said. Armed with handguns, the men entered Mother's Federal Hill Grille in the 1100 S. Charles St. around 6:30 a.m. and robbed employees of their wallets, cellular phones and cash. The suspects then fled the scene, Baltimore police said. "The four of us were pistol-whipped, and they took just personal items," said Kelly Rather, who co-owns the large bar and restaurant with her husband, Dave Rather, and his brother Adam Rather.
NEWS
November 7, 1997
CELLULAR PHONES for school buses are a good idea that's overdue. As long as their use is limited to real emergencies and important business communications, wireless telephones can pay off in the improved transportation of school children and better safety.Cell phones are becoming cheaper by the month. Service contracts are highly competitive. What was prohibitive in cost just a few years ago is now affordable and available.These phones should provide peace of mind for parents, as well as for the bus drivers.
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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 5, 1999
Fear not, chatty drivers. You can keep talking on your cellular phones.The House Commerce and Government Matters Committee killed a bill yesterday that would have banned drivers in Maryland from using their phones while driving.The measure drew support from only two of the committee's 23 members -- Del. John S. Arnick, the Baltimore County Democrat who sponsored the bill, and Del. Adrienne A. Mandel, a Montgomery County Democrat.Arnick said he proposed the bill because of the dangers of distraction and of having one hand busy with a phone rather than the steering wheel.
BUSINESS
By Christian Science Monitor | October 16, 1994
CHICAGO -- Overcoming widespread skepticism, Motorola Inc. has raised enough equity for a bold plan to encircle the earth with satellites, which will enable customers to use compact telephones from anywhere on the globe.Iridium Inc., a company launched in 1990 by the Schaumburg, Ill.-based Motorola, has mustered start-up capital totaling $1.57 billion by rallying an eclectic consortium of around 15 or so worldwide companies. The successful equity financing puts Iridium far ahead of rivals and enables it to seek debt financing to round out the $3.37 billion needed for the project.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | January 16, 1997
Baltimore County police uncovered what they said was a cellular phone cloning operation Monday when they searched the home of 32-year-old Woodlawn man and found 300 stolen phone numbers, as well as phones and equipment used to steal phone numbers from the airwaves.Curtis Juan Gilchrist of the 1500 block of Cantwell Road was charged under a state law that took effect in October with two counts of possession with intent to distribute, manufacture and sell cloned wireless telephone equipment, said Sgt. Mark Cowley of the county police Firearms Violence Unit.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Annapolis Bureau | February 19, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Save the Cellular Eight.That could have been the rallying cry yesterday when the Senate Budget and Taxation Committee held its annual hearing on Gov. William Donald Schaefer's budget, in other years a juicy morsel for those who like to dine out on the fat in state government.But these are lean times and car phones are one of the few points of contention in the 1993 executive budget.At $6,157,000, the governor's proposed budget is smaller than this year's. The number of staff positions paid for by other state agencies has been reduced from seven to four.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2012
If you hold a gathering of more than 50 boats in Maryland waters after June 1, you can expect to pay a "marine gathering permit fee" — the amount yet to be determined — under legislation proposed by the O'Malley administration. Need a certified copy of a marriage certificate? The cost would double from $12 to $24 under an administration proposal. Own a commercial scale with a capacity of more than a ton? The fee for registering it would increase from $75 to $100 under a bill submitted by the state Department of Agriculture.
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Jennifer Skalka,sun reporter | January 24, 2007
Democratic Sen. Norman R. Stone Jr. had two matters on his mind when he introduced a bill to ban hand-held cell phone use while driving: his serious car accident and a promise he made to the provision's longtime sponsor. With his wife as a passenger, Stone's five-day-old car was totaled 18 months ago when a driver using a cell phone blew through a stop sign and smashed into the vehicle. Since then, the General Assembly's chief past proponent of the cell phone bill - former Del. John S. Arnick of Dundalk - died.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 19, 2006
NEW YORK -- For pay phones in New York and pretty much everywhere, time is expiring. Once planted like lifelines on city sidewalks and in small businesses, pay phones are rapidly disappearing from an ever-expanding wireless landscape. The proliferation in recent years of cellular phones, not to mention BlackBerrys and Sidekicks, is doing nothing to get the pay phone off the endangered species list. Like the phonograph and the typewriter, the pay phone could one day become an anachronism, the kind of prop seen in period films.
NEWS
By MARI PERRY and MARI PERRY,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | January 1, 2006
Matthew Robb has a problem with his cell phone: He has trouble hearing the person on the other end and often can't even place calls. Robb said he gets poor reception at best on his Sprint cell phone anywhere in his hometown of Frederick. He said the company's response to his complaint is that it doesn't guarantee reception. "The problem with that is the only reason you get a cell phone is reception," Robb said. "It's not a paperweight." Robb recently filed a complaint with the Maryland attorney general, making him part of a growing number of Marylanders who are frustrated with their cell phone service and no longer inclined to suffer in silence.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2005
As a United Airlines plane recently taxied toward its gate at Reagan Washington National Airport, a group of 15 excited school kids on board pulled out their cell phones to call friends. Friends on the same plane, that is. The chatter, permitted while the plane was on the ground, could at some point be allowed in-flight, something that flight attendant Valerie Walker said might be hard to take. Yesterday, she, along with officials from the Association of Flight Attendants and the National Consumers League, released a poll that found most travelers agree that lifting a government ban on in-flight cell phone use would jeopardize more than their safety and security.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Sumathi Reddy and Ivan Penn and Sumathi Reddy,SUN STAFF | March 24, 2005
Efforts by the Ehrlich administration and state lawmakers to toughen restrictions on teenage drivers moved closer to law yesterday, with action on proposals to ban cellular phone use by most motorists under 18 and toughen sanctions for drunken and drugged driving. After several days of debate, the Senate voted, 27-17, in favor of a bill by Montgomery County lawmakers to prohibit provisional-license drivers from driving while using a cellular phone. The House passed a similar version of the bill last week.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1996
Cellular phones are being stolen at epidemic rates in Baltimore, a crime wave driven by thieves' and drug dealers' demand for cheap phones that can't be traced.Nearly two dozen phones disappear every day in the city -- most of the thefts accompanied by a shattered car window. In the first seven months of this year, 9,507 cars were broken into; in about half the cases, cellular phones were taken.The outbreak is fueled by a high-tech, $600 million criminal industry that has turned a hot commodity of the '90s into a tool of the drug trade.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2001
Often labeled as troublemakers when used on the road or in a crowded theater, cellular phones take on a Good Samaritan quality when their owners donate them to the elderly or to battered women for emergency use. In Howard County, volunteers and law enforcement officers have worked together this summer to distribute a mountain of cell phones to seniors in the county and beyond. Such programs are popping up all over the country, in part to extend the life of the estimated 30 million cell phones that go out of use each year.
FEATURES
By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,ORLANDO SENTINEL | September 10, 2004
Cellular is a kidnapping-thriller starring the new Nokia 6600 cell phone. It co-stars Oscar winner Kim Basinger, one-time Oscar nominee William H. Macy and one of the kids from The Perfect Score. Basinger plays Jessica Martin, a teacher who lives with her Realtor husband and unfortunately named son, Ricky. One day, she drops Ricky Martin off at school, comes home to a dead maid and a kidnapper. Ryan (Chris Evans, of Score) is an irresponsible hunk who can't understand why his girlfriend (Jessica Biel)
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Hanah Cho and Athima Chansanchai and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2004
After a brief hearing that drew no public comment, the Carroll County commissioners approved a plan yesterday to increase by 25 cents the fee that county telephone customers pay for 911 service. The change would raise to 75 cents the monthly charge on all land-line and cellular telephone bills in Carroll County. The increase - expected to generate an additional $345,000 to $350,000 - would offset the cost of operating and maintaining the county's 911 emergency center, public safety officials said.
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