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BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley | February 11, 1992
Bell Atlantic Mobile Systems and four other companies plan to band together to look for ways to standardize such things as billing, advertising and network performance for their cellular customers.The five companies -- Bell Atlantic Mobile, Ameritech Mobile Communications, Contel Cellular Inc., GTE Mobilnet and NYNEX Mobile Communications -- agreed to develop a joint strategy for approaching the market that could lead to a national standard for wireless services."This opens up a lot of futuristic doors for us," said Janet Henderson, a spokeswoman for GTE in Atlanta.
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NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,sun reporter | April 27, 2007
A pioneering Johns Hopkins neuroscientist has won the country's most lucrative biomedical research prize for work on cellular communication that helped revolutionize drug development. Dr. Solomon H. Snyder, who founded Johns Hopkins School of Medicine's neuroscience department, was one of three scientists awarded the Albany Medical Center Prize in Medicine and Biomedical Research. The researchers, who all made groundbreaking discoveries on how cells communicate with their environment through molecular receptors, will split the $500,000 prize.
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BUSINESS
By Anthony Ramirez and Anthony Ramirez,New York Times News Service | February 11, 1992
NEW YORK --Two of the world's largest telecommunications companies, Northern Telecom Ltd. of Canada and Motorola Inc. of the United States, said yesterday that they planned to market their equipment jointly to large operators of cellular telephone systems, many of which have been buying equipment from rivals such as AT&T and LM Ericsson AB of Sweden.The move is intended to strengthen the competitiveness of both companies, which had competed directly in some digital switches, the giant multimillion-dollar computers that can field thousands of calls.
NEWS
By Siobhan Gorman and Siobhan Gorman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 22, 2005
The National Security Agency's new director, Lt. Gen. Keith B. Alexander, comes to his job at a defining moment: Modernize the NSA to confront stateless extremist threats, or face post-9/11 obsolescence. To survive, the agency must leap from the "industrial age" to the "information age," as Alexander put it in an interview at his Fort Meade office last week. "That is where our country needs us to go for our security." In three decades as a military man, most recently as the Army's intelligence chief, Alexander built a reputation as an aggressive problem-solver who can skillfully navigate bureaucratic roadblocks.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | February 28, 1995
For at least five years, Anne Arundel homeowners have been battling zoning applications for cellular communications towers in their neighborhoods. And county officials say they have been making decisions without much help from the county code.Now, county planners are drafting regulations that they hope will reconcile the needs of the fast-growing mobile communications industry with community concerns over the prospect of a 300-foot tower rising out of the landscape next door."Technology has surpassed our zoning code," said Steven Cover, who became the county's planning chief in January.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | June 30, 1994
Bell Atlantic Corp. and Nynex Corp., two of the seven Bell companies created in the breakup of AT&T, announced today that they will merge their cellular phone businesses to create a unified wireless network stretching from Maine to North Carolina.Philadelphia-based Bell Atlantic, the regional giant whose wired-line territory includes Maryland, will be the dominant partner in the combined company -- controlling a 62.35 percent interest compared with New York-based Nynex's 37.65 percent.Raymond W. Smith, Bell Atlantic's chairman and chief executive, made it clear that his company regards the merger as only the first phase in creating a national wireless network for personal communications services (PCS)
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | January 30, 1993
NEW YORK -- Stock prices closed slightly higher yesterday. Over-the-counter issues stabilized after a recent sell-off, while the broad market overcame declines in shares of cellular phone companies and oil firms.The Dow Jones industrial average inched up 3.78 points, to 3,310.03, finishing the week with a gain of 53.22 points. Rebounds in IBM and Coca-Cola outweighed losses in Allied-Signal and International Paper.Among broader market averages, the Standard & Poor's 500 index climbed 0.11, to 438.78.
BUSINESS
By Tom Steinert-Threlkeld and Tom Steinert-Threlkeld,Dallas Morning News | February 9, 1992
DALLAS -- Northern Telecom Ltd. and Motorola Inc. will announce tomorrow that they are teaming up to introduce small-scale wireless communications systems that will usher in an era of multifeature "walkphones," industry insiders said.Northern Telecom Chairman Paul G. Stern and Motorola officials are expected to announce the alliance is expected in New York. The deal will link one of the world's three largest telephone switch-makers and one of the world's three largest cellular communications companies.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | August 17, 1993
U.S. stocks soared in a rally driven by optimism that inflation is in check and by confidence in key sectors of the economy -- like telecommunications, semiconductors and aluminum -- traders and analysts said.Cellular stocks were among the day's biggest gainers, catapulted by the $12.6 billion merger agreement between American Telephone & Telegraph Co. and McCaw Cellular Communications Corp. The marriage will combine the nation's largest long-distance phone company and its biggest cellular phone company.
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley | October 8, 1990
In 1981, Wayne Schelle gave a speech before 1,200 mobile-phone executives in New Orleans in which he painted a bright future for cellular communications, a new field of technology his small, Baltimore-based paging company was poised to enter.After the speech, Mr. Schelle said, his wife, Elaine, who had been sitting in the audience, hurried up to him with a concerned look on her face."She said, 'You know, Wayne, I hope you're really sure this thing is going to work because people all around me were saying you were crazy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Christopher Boyd and Christopher Boyd,ORLANDO SENTINEL | May 20, 2004
ORLANDO, Fla. - Thousands of drivers zipping along Interstate 4 between Lee Road and Maitland Boulevard every day are oblivious as they pass through a demonstration zone for a telecommunications technology on the cutting edge. Small transceivers mounted on lampposts and bolted to rooftops along the route form the backbone of an electronic "mesh" - a high-speed, wireless communications web that allows properly equipped travelers to surf the Internet and place phone calls. The roadside web is a showcase for MeshNetworks Inc.'s signature technology.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | January 4, 1998
Phones used to be such simple things.Years ago, the biggest dilemma consumers faced was whether to mount a phone on a wall or plop it on an end table. Then came cellular, and customers could choose between old-fashioned, plugged-in phones and wireless phones.Now customers who want to go wireless must pick between analog and digital phones, and many of them are opting for digital. Peter Nighswander of the Strategis Group Inc., a Washington telecommunications research firm, said there are about 3 million digital wireless users nationwide, a 150 percent increase from 1996.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | May 11, 1995
Washington. -- Bill Mockler is one of the fortunate few for whom there is no clear distinction between work and play. ''I love,'' he says, ''the challenge of trying to put people in jail.'' It is especially challenging because, he says, he is ''dealing with some of the craftiest people in the criminal world.'' It is a measure of Mr. Mockler's professionalism that he can acknowledge the skills of his Colombian adversaries while despising the activities the skills serve.Mr. Mockler, who speaks in the Flatbush accent of his native Brooklyn, is 51, six years from mandatory retirement from what is largely a young man's business, the Sisyphean task of disrupting the distribution of illegal narcotics.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | February 28, 1995
For at least five years, Anne Arundel homeowners have been battling zoning applications for cellular communications towers in their neighborhoods. And county officials say they have been making decisions without much help from the county code.Now, county planners are drafting regulations that they hope will reconcile the needs of the fast-growing mobile communications industry with community concerns over the prospect of a 300-foot tower rising out of the landscape next door."Technology has surpassed our zoning code," said Steven Cover, who became the county's planning chief in January.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | June 30, 1994
Bell Atlantic Corp. and Nynex Corp., two of the seven Bell companies created in the breakup of AT&T, announced today that they will merge their cellular phone businesses to create a unified wireless network stretching from Maine to North Carolina.Philadelphia-based Bell Atlantic, the regional giant whose wired-line territory includes Maryland, will be the dominant partner in the combined company -- controlling a 62.35 percent interest compared with New York-based Nynex's 37.65 percent.Raymond W. Smith, Bell Atlantic's chairman and chief executive, made it clear that his company regards the merger as only the first phase in creating a national wireless network for personal communications services (PCS)
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | August 17, 1993
U.S. stocks soared in a rally driven by optimism that inflation is in check and by confidence in key sectors of the economy -- like telecommunications, semiconductors and aluminum -- traders and analysts said.Cellular stocks were among the day's biggest gainers, catapulted by the $12.6 billion merger agreement between American Telephone & Telegraph Co. and McCaw Cellular Communications Corp. The marriage will combine the nation's largest long-distance phone company and its biggest cellular phone company.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Christopher Boyd and Christopher Boyd,ORLANDO SENTINEL | May 20, 2004
ORLANDO, Fla. - Thousands of drivers zipping along Interstate 4 between Lee Road and Maitland Boulevard every day are oblivious as they pass through a demonstration zone for a telecommunications technology on the cutting edge. Small transceivers mounted on lampposts and bolted to rooftops along the route form the backbone of an electronic "mesh" - a high-speed, wireless communications web that allows properly equipped travelers to surf the Internet and place phone calls. The roadside web is a showcase for MeshNetworks Inc.'s signature technology.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | May 11, 1995
Washington. -- Bill Mockler is one of the fortunate few for whom there is no clear distinction between work and play. ''I love,'' he says, ''the challenge of trying to put people in jail.'' It is especially challenging because, he says, he is ''dealing with some of the craftiest people in the criminal world.'' It is a measure of Mr. Mockler's professionalism that he can acknowledge the skills of his Colombian adversaries while despising the activities the skills serve.Mr. Mockler, who speaks in the Flatbush accent of his native Brooklyn, is 51, six years from mandatory retirement from what is largely a young man's business, the Sisyphean task of disrupting the distribution of illegal narcotics.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | January 30, 1993
NEW YORK -- Stock prices closed slightly higher yesterday. Over-the-counter issues stabilized after a recent sell-off, while the broad market overcame declines in shares of cellular phone companies and oil firms.The Dow Jones industrial average inched up 3.78 points, to 3,310.03, finishing the week with a gain of 53.22 points. Rebounds in IBM and Coca-Cola outweighed losses in Allied-Signal and International Paper.Among broader market averages, the Standard & Poor's 500 index climbed 0.11, to 438.78.
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley | February 11, 1992
Bell Atlantic Mobile Systems and four other companies plan to band together to look for ways to standardize such things as billing, advertising and network performance for their cellular customers.The five companies -- Bell Atlantic Mobile, Ameritech Mobile Communications, Contel Cellular Inc., GTE Mobilnet and NYNEX Mobile Communications -- agreed to develop a joint strategy for approaching the market that could lead to a national standard for wireless services."This opens up a lot of futuristic doors for us," said Janet Henderson, a spokeswoman for GTE in Atlanta.
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