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NEWS
By Art Buchwald | March 10, 1993
SCIENTISTS are finding out more and more about the dangers of cellular phones. In England they have recently discovered that the phone can even affect members of the royal family.Sir Burton Katzen confirmed this in studies he conducted on the M-1 motorway where he listened in on one member of the royal family talking to a commoner friend.Transcripts of these conversations made available by members of the vigilant British press indicate that the car phone created a lot of static for the users.
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SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
CHICAGO -- Watching Nick Markakis patrol right field for the past nine seasons, Orioles fans have grown accustomed to watching him make tough defensive plays look routine. But there was no questioning the difficulty factor of the potentially game-saving catch that he made Monday night against the Chicago White Sox. Markakis took away a go-ahead homer from Conor Gillaspie in the seventh inning, making a leaping grab while crashing into the right-field fence. The Orioles offense responded to the momentum-grabbing play by opening up a close game for an 8-2 win over the White Sox in front of an announced 16,686 at U.S. Cellular Field.
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NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Sun Staff Writer | December 7, 1994
Without comment, the county Board of Appeals voted last night to permit installation of a cellular telephone antenna in Ellicott City that opponents fear will send out harmful radiation to their homes and a nearby school.The board also denied a request by the county's only Orthodox synagogue to teach first-graders.The request was opposed by residents of Columbia's Sebring neighborhood where the synagogue is located.In the cellular phone tower case, the board voted 3-1 to approve a zoning exception for a 125-foot tower proposed by Southwestern Bell Mobile Systems Inc. for its Cellular One phone system.
NEWS
By Seth Cooper | December 10, 2012
Today's economy has been tough on Maryland's small businesses. With consumers struggling with less disposable income and the state's unemployment rate stuck stubbornly high at near 7 percent, businesses have had to cut costs and tighten their belts any way they can. Unfortunately, outdated tax policies are adding to our economic burdens. Despite weak growth and the threat of another recession, taxes on the wireless services used by nearly every Maryland business continue to rise.
NEWS
By BILL BURTON | January 20, 1991
Remember when boating and fishing were considered escapes -- a way to get away from it all? Alas, no more. The cellular phone is changing all that.And the more inexpensive the mobile phones and their servic options, the more evident they are on boats of all sizes. Small boaters claim they favor cellulars for emergency communications, but it's not uncommon for them to carry on business as usual on the water.Outfitter Ken Penrod of Outdoor Life Unlimited has had anglin clients pass him a rod while fighting a fish so they could answer rings of cellular phones.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | December 4, 1994
Tomorrow the megabucks begin chasing the megahertz.Sometime around noon in a post office building in Washington, ** after Vice President Gore and a host of lesser mortals orate about the glories of competition, the gavel will fall and 99 precious pieces of the sky will go on the auction bloc.The prizes in the auction will be licenses to operate personal communications services (PCS), often described as a new generation of cellular phones but potentially much more, in 51 huge markets throughout the United States and its island territories.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 21, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Four telecommunications companies with large regional cellular holdings came together yesterday in an East Coast-West Coast alliance designed to gobble up enough wireless telephone licenses in the heartland to create a "seamless" national network.Bell Atlantic Corp. and Nynex Corp., which announced in June that they would merge their cellular telephone holdings, will form a common venture with U S West Inc. and AirTouch Communications, which unveiled a somewhat looser partnership in July.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | January 11, 1993
Tinker with a police scanner or an old television, and you, too, can listen in on the cellular telephone conversations of the rich and busy -- until now.A Towson-area company is launching sales today of a U.S.-made privacy system that promises to draw an electronic curtain against "listening Toms" who eavesdrop on the nation's 8 million cellular phone users.The PrivaFone Corp.'s system operates using principles similar to those employed by super-secure devices issued by the National Security Agency to government employees who might make classified calls from their car phones.
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley | October 31, 1991
Cellular One said yesterday its regional cellular phone system will be upgraded to all-digital by January, allowing customers to use a new generation of digital phones as soon as they hit the retail shelves next year.Digital technology offers better reception, greater capacity and more security -- for conversations and data -- than the current analog technology."When the phones come out, our customers will immediately be able to use digital," said Angela Byerly, a spokeswoman for Cellular One, the cellular arm of Southwestern Bell.
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | March 5, 2004
Anne Arundel County Executive Janet S. Owens began selling her proposed cellular-phone tax to reluctant state legislators yesterday, telling them the proceeds would bolster her shorthanded police and fire departments. "We have to build a solid public safety system and we need your support," Owens said. She is seeking authority to levy, with County Council approval, a 5 percent tax on county residents' cellular phone bills. Such a tax would allow the county to raise between $6 million and $10 million annually, county officials have said.
EXPLORE
April 30, 2012
Cellular Sales, the nation's largest Verizon premium wireless retailer, recently announced the grand opening of a new store at 1435 Rock Spring Road in Bel Air. "Cellular Sales is pleased to open our newest store on Rock Spring Road," Kory White, regional director of Cellular Sales, said in a press release. "We want our store to be a resource for customers to get all their wireless services needs met with outstanding service by our experts. " Cellular Sales was founded in Knoxville, Tenn., 19 years ago and has, for the past four years, been named by Inc. Magazine one of the nation's fastest growing privately-owned retailers operating 500 stores with nearly 4,000 employees.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2011
Mercina Daskalakis, who co-owned and operated a wireless communications business and became a donor to religious, educational and health charities, died of cancer Feb. 27 at Gilchrist Hospice. She was 69 and lived in Baldwin. Born Mercina Vendelis in Baltimore, she was known as Cina and lived on Lehigh Street in Highlandtown as a child. Her parents owned the Busy Bee Restaurant in Northeast Baltimore and later the Bee Hive on Lexington Street in downtown Baltimore. She was a manager at the restaurant, which was patronized by City Hall, courthouse and postal employees.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,jamison.hensley@baltsun.com | October 7, 2009
Tony Fein, an Iraq War veteran who was a member of the Ravens during the preseason, died Tuesday morning in Port Orchard, Wash., according to his agent. There were no immediate details about his death, said the agent, Milton D. Hobbs. "It's a very sad situation," Hobbs told The Baltimore Sun late Tuesday night. "I am still trying to figure out what happened." Fein, 27, was an undrafted rookie free-agent linebacker who was released by the Ravens in their final major cutdown Sept. 5. Although old for a rookie, Fein, at 6 feet 2, 245 pounds, caught the eyes of scouts at the University of Mississippi's Pro Day, where the school's football players audition for scouts before the NFL draft.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,sun reporter | April 27, 2007
A pioneering Johns Hopkins neuroscientist has won the country's most lucrative biomedical research prize for work on cellular communication that helped revolutionize drug development. Dr. Solomon H. Snyder, who founded Johns Hopkins School of Medicine's neuroscience department, was one of three scientists awarded the Albany Medical Center Prize in Medicine and Biomedical Research. The researchers, who all made groundbreaking discoveries on how cells communicate with their environment through molecular receptors, will split the $500,000 prize.
SPORTS
By Jack McCarthy and Jack McCarthy,Special to the Sun | February 19, 2007
MILWAUKEE -- The Blast will happily give up some sleep if it means more results like this. Yesterday's 14-12 come-from-behind victory over the host Milwaukee Wave at U.S. Cellular Arena cemented a weekend sweep of home-and-home matches with Milwaukee. Blast@Storm Saturday, 2 p.m., 680 AM
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Jennifer Skalka,sun reporter | January 24, 2007
Democratic Sen. Norman R. Stone Jr. had two matters on his mind when he introduced a bill to ban hand-held cell phone use while driving: his serious car accident and a promise he made to the provision's longtime sponsor. With his wife as a passenger, Stone's five-day-old car was totaled 18 months ago when a driver using a cell phone blew through a stop sign and smashed into the vehicle. Since then, the General Assembly's chief past proponent of the cell phone bill - former Del. John S. Arnick of Dundalk - died.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | June 23, 1995
Bell Atlantic Mobile and Cellular One, the duo that have dominated the Baltimore-Washington cellular phone service market since its inception, now have a powerful new competitor: MCI.The nation's No. 2 long-distance company announced yesterday that Baltimore and Washington are among the 10 markets in which it is introducing wireless services through its MCI Cellular subsidiary. The cellular service will be packaged with a menu of other MCI services, including paging, electronic mail and a new "lifetime" 500 number service that was also introduced yesterday.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | November 25, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Sprint Cellular Co. filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission yesterday to sell up to $800 million in debt securities as part of a spinoff of the company from Sprint Corp.Chicago-based Sprint Cellular will use proceeds from the sale, along with other borrowing, to repay $1.4 billion in debt it owes the parent company and its subsidiaries, the company said in the filing.As of Sept. 30, Sprint Cellular had $1.52 billion in outstanding intercompany debt, the filing said.
NEWS
By MARI PERRY and MARI PERRY,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | January 1, 2006
Matthew Robb has a problem with his cell phone: He has trouble hearing the person on the other end and often can't even place calls. Robb said he gets poor reception at best on his Sprint cell phone anywhere in his hometown of Frederick. He said the company's response to his complaint is that it doesn't guarantee reception. "The problem with that is the only reason you get a cell phone is reception," Robb said. "It's not a paperweight." Robb recently filed a complaint with the Maryland attorney general, making him part of a growing number of Marylanders who are frustrated with their cell phone service and no longer inclined to suffer in silence.
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