Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCells
IN THE NEWS

Cells

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Ruth R. Faden | February 12, 2010
Much has been written and discussed recently about Henrietta Lacks, the African-American woman from Baltimore whose cancer cells, collected for research 60 years ago -- as she was being treated for the cervical cancer that took her life --inexplicably but astoundingly grew in the laboratory without end. The cells, named HeLa, have contributed to cancer therapies, the polio vaccine and a myriad of other biomedical advances. Sadly, in 1951, tissue from patients destined exclusively for biomedical research -- and not, for example, to diagnose or treat disease -- was commonly taken without their consent, stored and used by scientists.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2014
An inmate at the Carroll County Detention Center died Sunday after being found unresponsive in his cell Friday. About 2 p.m. Friday, correctional officer found Ronnie Mosko, 43, of Westminster alone and unresponsive in his holding cell. Medics worked to revive him and transported him to Carroll Medical Center. He remained in critical condition for most of the weekend, but he was pronounced death about 4 a.m. Sunday. Mosko was arrested on Wednesday night for a non-violent domestic related offense.
Advertisement
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2010
Doctors and researchers involved in embryonic-stem-cell experiments in Maryland and nationwide fear that potentially life-saving discoveries are being jeopardized by a judge who has blocked federal funding for such research. Grants from a state fund for stem-cell research are not affected, but federal research funds that flow to institutions such as the University of Maryland and the Johns Hopkins University would be cut off. That could affect a $500,000 experiment conducted by researchers in labs at both universities.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
A leak on a natural gas line forced the closure Friday afternoon of BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport's parking lot for people waiting to pick up arriving fliers. The airport's fire department responded to the so-called "cell phone lot" just before 3 p.m., and determined a leak along a Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. line, said Jonathan Dean, an airport spokesman. The leak presented "no real hazard to the public or travelers" at the airport, but the lot was closed as BGE crews worked to repair the line, Dean said.
HEALTH
By Kelly Brewington, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2010
With the financial backing of the Vatican, University of Maryland researchers will lead an international group of scientists to study adult stem cells from the intestines with the hope of discovering treatments for diseases while bypassing the ethical debates that have embroiled such research for a decade. The partnership, known as the International Intestinal Stem Cell Consortium, brings together researchers from the Center for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine at the University of Maryland; the University of Salerno, Bambino Gesu — an Italian children's hospital; and the Istituto Superiore di Sanita — the Italian equivalent of the National Institutes of Health.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Frank Roylance and Jonathan Bor and Frank Roylance,Sun reporters | November 21, 2007
Scientists in the U.S. and Japan have converted human skin cells into stem cells like the ones found in embryos, a breakthrough that could yield regenerative therapies without igniting the ethical debates that have embroiled the field for nearly a decade. Yesterday's announcements raise the possibility that cells taken from sick patients could be reprogrammed and used to repair tissues damaged by heart disease, diabetes and other illnesses. The technique, achieved earlier this year in mice, holds two potential advantages.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin and David Michael Ettlin,Sun Staff Writer | August 30, 1994
A former National Institutes of Health scientist found in an unusual court case to have intentionally killed genetically engineered living cells out of apparent jealousy toward a colleague has been ordered to pay damages to the federal government.The decision by U.S. District Court Judge Peter Messitte was hailed yesterday by the U.S. attorney's office for Maryland as an important step in a relatively new area of law -- the development of genetically engineered organisms."The case is highly unusual in that it is one of the first to address the legal question of whether genetically engineered living cells are property protected from intentional harm by federal law," the U.S. attorney's office said.
BUSINESS
By Michael Pollick | November 4, 1991
What's all the excitement about biotechnology? It is about being able to manipulate the cellular machinery of life to create products of value: pharmaceuticals and diagnostics.Until the mid-1970s, this cellular machinery, which works the same way for all living things, was really a black box. It didn't lend itself to manipulation.If you think of the human being as a computer, the extremely long molecule called DNA that is contained in every one of our cells is like the software system. It works like a hard disk on a computer, and it contains all the information that your body will ever use in its lifetime.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor | November 27, 1990
Scientists at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine have observed that abnormally high levels of aluminum produce toxic changes in animal brain cells -- changes that may suggest a link between the metal and human diseases of the brain, such as Alzheimer's.But Dr. Harvey Singer, a Hopkins neurologist, said yesterday that the experiment doesn't answer long-festering suspicions that aluminum causes Alzheimer's and a host of other brain disorders. Further research, he said, is needed before consumers should consider discarding their aluminum pots and pans.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder | December 24, 1991
Men whose blood contains large blood-clotting cells are more likely to suffer a second heart attack, according to a finding that could help develop more effective drugs to prevent heart disease, British researchers report in the Lancet, a medical journal.The findings also lend more support to low-dose aspirin therapy, because aspirin affects platelets.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
It's doubtful anyone attending Colonial Players' 65th season closer would react with "been there, done that" to playwright Sarah Ruhl's "Dead Man's Cell Phone. " Having enjoyed a bowl of lobster bisque in a cafe, a young woman answers the ringing cellphone of the man at the next table, who has just died of a heart attack, and she is drawn into the lives of his family and others who call his phone while it is in her possession. In trying to console them, she finds her life changed.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | May 2, 2014
For the first time, more people own smartphones than basic cell phones, according to the Consumer Electronics Association. Nearly two-thirds, 64 percent, of U.S. households own smartphones, the group said Thursday in its annual Household CE Ownership and Market Potential Study. That compares to 51 percent household ownership of cell phones. The survey showed strong demand for mobile products last year and so far this year. Four of the top five planned technology purchases have a mobile component, with smartphones topping the list followed by headphones, televisions, laptop, notebook or netbook computers and tablets.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2014
A California agency that oversees $3 billion in stem cell research funding Wednesday named former Osiris Therapeutics head C. Randal Mills to replace its outgoing CEO. Mills, a Bethesda native and Baltimore resident, stepped down in December after almost 10 years at Osiris, citing personal reasons. The California Institute for Regenerative Medicine's governing board selected Mills from seven finalists after interviews in April, spokesman Kevin McCormack said. He will make $550,000 in his new position and a start date has not been determined, McCormack said.
NEWS
March 31, 2014
In January, Rick Raemisch was brought shackled and handcuffed to a state penitentiary in Colorado and deposited in a 13-by-17-foot cell with nothing in it except a bed, toilet and sink screwed to the floor. His restraints were removed, the door slammed shut behind him and then he was alone. Mr. Raemisch had committed no crime. He was, in fact, the recently appointed head of Colorado's corrections department, and as he later wrote in a New York Times op-ed, he hoped that by putting himself in an inmate's place he might get "a better sense of what solitary confinement was like, and what it did to the prisoners who were housed there, sometimes for years.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2014
Parked drivers waiting at BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport for calls from just-landed loved ones will have to do so from a new location starting April 1. The airport's so-called "cell phone lot" will move from one side of Terminal Road to the other, adjacent to the airport's daily parking garage, officials said Thursday. The move will double the number of parking spots in the free waiting area from 50 to 100. It will also add additional spaces to the airport's "express" parking lot, which offers luggage assistance and "carside-to-curbside" shuttle services.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | March 15, 2014
Harford County Sheriff's Office deputies are looking for two men in connection with an reported armed carjacking that occurred early Saturday morning in the vicinity of the MARC train station in Edgewood. Deputies were called to the station off Edgewood Road near the entrance to Aberdeen Proving Ground around 1 a.m., where a 41-year-old Baltimore man reported he had just been carjacked, Sheriff's Office spokesman Edward Hopkins said. According to the preliminary report filed on the incident, Hopkins said, the victim told deputies a friend had wanted to be dropped off at the station to meet of girlfriend.
NEWS
By Robert Cooke and Robert Cooke,Newsday | June 21, 1991
For the first time, living cells from humans have been transplanted successfully into mice, scientists reported yesterday, suggesting that it may become possible to do the opposite, using animal organs to cure human diseases.By treating the human cells, "masking" them from the mouse's immune system, Dr. Denise Faustman said, she and colleagues at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston were able to implant the cells without rejection and without using drugs to suppress the rodents' normal immunity.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | March 14, 2014
The House of Delegates approved a bill Friday that would allow a judge to give up to a year's sentence to a driver who negligently kills or seriously injures someone while texting or speaking on a hand-held cellphone. The 111-25 vote on the legislation known as Jake's Law sends the measure to the Senate. The bill was named after 5-year-old Jake Owen, who was killed in a crash in 2011 caused by a driver police found to have been using a cell phone when he struck Jake's family's car. The driver was acquitted of reckless driving and vehicular manslaughter and convicted of traffic charges that led to a $1,000 fine.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2014
The House Judiciary voted Wednesday night to approve a bill that would allow a judge to give up to a one-year jail term to a driver who kills someone while distracted by use of a hand-held cell phone. By a bipartisan 18-3 vote, the panel sent the measure known as Jake's Law to the full House. The legislation is named after 5-year-old Jake Owen, who was killed near the Beltway and Interstate 83 three days after Christmas 2011 when the driver of an SUV plowed into the rear of the vehicle in which his family was traveling to a mall to return presents.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.