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Cellophane

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NEWS
October 23, 1998
Karl E. Prindle,95, who developed moisture-proof cellophane and a type of tape used on packages of chewing gum and cigarettes, died recently in Cleveland.He was 24 when he developed moisture-proof cellophane for DuPont in the mid-1920s. He also developed Lurex, a nontarnish metallic thread used in fabric, and zip tape, the cellophane strip used in chewing gum and cigarette packages.Pub Date: 10/23/98
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FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | August 10, 2007
Ever get the feeling the gold at Fort Knox isn't as well-protected as some of the DVDs one purchases at the local Best Buy? We're not talking about all the anti- pirating devices, either. Rather, we refer to the 3,251 pieces of clear, frequently impossible-to-remove adhesive tape that serve to hermetically seal the DVD case. OK, we know there are only three pieces in most cases, but really, is all that protection necessary? Take home your new copy of The Bachelor and the Bobby-Soxer, and it's bad enough you have to find a handy knife somewhere to remove the cellophane packaging.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2005
"Grab your Walkman, and make sure you bring extra duct tape. You'll need it to make sure that gigantic weight hanging off your side doesn't fall and crash to the ground, and blast the Huey Lewis." "Go for some Fruit Roll-Ups. Make sure to separate the cellophane from the equally toxic candied sheet. The cellophane's probably healthier to eat." "Cool off. Take a dip with some Snorks at your local pool. Snork it up, seriously." "Guys, put on your rainbow-striped Mork suspenders, and make sure the lady in your life wears shoulder pads.
NEWS
By LAURA DEMANSKI and LAURA DEMANSKI,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 2, 2006
Cellophane Marie Arana Dial / 371 pages / $24 In Marie Arana's expansive, exuberant first novel, a mid-20th century inventor with a passion for paper builds a factory in the middle of the Peruvian jungle and there develops his own process for making cellophane. That cellophane had been invented by a Swiss engineer nearly half a century earlier, and has been produced and sold by DuPont for more than a quarter-century, does little to dim the thrill of discovery for Don Victor Sobrevilla.
NEWS
By LAURA DEMANSKI and LAURA DEMANSKI,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 2, 2006
Cellophane Marie Arana Dial / 371 pages / $24 In Marie Arana's expansive, exuberant first novel, a mid-20th century inventor with a passion for paper builds a factory in the middle of the Peruvian jungle and there develops his own process for making cellophane. That cellophane had been invented by a Swiss engineer nearly half a century earlier, and has been produced and sold by DuPont for more than a quarter-century, does little to dim the thrill of discovery for Don Victor Sobrevilla.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | January 24, 1995
Rix A. Dieffenbach, retired president of a company that manufactured drinking straws, died Saturday of a stroke at his home in Spring Hill, Fla. The former Ruxton resident was 85.Along with his father, Otto W. Dieffenbach, he founded Glassips Inc., makers of cellophane drinking straws, beverage swizzle sticks and other restaurant supplies, in 1933.The elder Mr. Dieffenbach came up with the idea of producing straws after opening a flat tin of cigarettes and winding its cellophane -- introduced into this country in 1927 from France -- around a metal rod on his desk.
FEATURES
By Niki Scott and Niki Scott,Universal Press Syndicate | November 3, 1991
There's no hard evidence that the children of working mothers are more at risk for problems with drugs and/or alcohol abuse than are the children of mothers who work at home full time, all other factors being equal.In her new book, "Kids, Alcohol & Drugs" (Ballantine), Ruth Maxwell advises parents to confront their children immediately if they observe any of the following warning signs:* "Alcohol on a child's breath, slurred words, stumbling, staggering gait, unfocused eyes, rambling or repetitive talk, vomitus with alcohol odor, blackouts."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | August 10, 2007
Ever get the feeling the gold at Fort Knox isn't as well-protected as some of the DVDs one purchases at the local Best Buy? We're not talking about all the anti- pirating devices, either. Rather, we refer to the 3,251 pieces of clear, frequently impossible-to-remove adhesive tape that serve to hermetically seal the DVD case. OK, we know there are only three pieces in most cases, but really, is all that protection necessary? Take home your new copy of The Bachelor and the Bobby-Soxer, and it's bad enough you have to find a handy knife somewhere to remove the cellophane packaging.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Dennis O'Brien contributed to this article | August 30, 1996
Maryland State Police arrested a Washington man yesterday, minutes after a suspicious package addressed to Gov. Parris N. Glendening was spied outside the State House and forced the building's evacuation for the second time this month.Arrested and charged with two counts of "placing a hoax device" -- a suspected bomb -- was Daniel James, 62, whose last known address was G Street in Washington, said Col. David B. Mitchell, the state police superintendent.jTC Police charged James in yesterday's incident and in an Aug. 5 bomb scare that forced employees from the State House and nearby buildings.
NEWS
March 26, 1997
Harriet "Patsy" Pratt Morris,66, a crusader against the death penalty, died Sunday of lung cancer in Atlanta. Dubbed the "Queen of Death Row" in a 1979 Time magazine profile, Mrs. Morris spent many hours trying to persuade lawyers to represent defendants of often heinous crimes for free in Georgia death penalty cases.She helped establish the Atlanta chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union and was its administrative director in the 1970s.She was one of the first to document what studies would later confirm: The likelihood of receiving the death penalty depended largely on race, the victim's social status and the county where the crime occurred.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2005
"Grab your Walkman, and make sure you bring extra duct tape. You'll need it to make sure that gigantic weight hanging off your side doesn't fall and crash to the ground, and blast the Huey Lewis." "Go for some Fruit Roll-Ups. Make sure to separate the cellophane from the equally toxic candied sheet. The cellophane's probably healthier to eat." "Cool off. Take a dip with some Snorks at your local pool. Snork it up, seriously." "Guys, put on your rainbow-striped Mork suspenders, and make sure the lady in your life wears shoulder pads.
NEWS
October 23, 1998
Karl E. Prindle,95, who developed moisture-proof cellophane and a type of tape used on packages of chewing gum and cigarettes, died recently in Cleveland.He was 24 when he developed moisture-proof cellophane for DuPont in the mid-1920s. He also developed Lurex, a nontarnish metallic thread used in fabric, and zip tape, the cellophane strip used in chewing gum and cigarette packages.Pub Date: 10/23/98
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Dennis O'Brien contributed to this article | August 30, 1996
Maryland State Police arrested a Washington man yesterday, minutes after a suspicious package addressed to Gov. Parris N. Glendening was spied outside the State House and forced the building's evacuation for the second time this month.Arrested and charged with two counts of "placing a hoax device" -- a suspected bomb -- was Daniel James, 62, whose last known address was G Street in Washington, said Col. David B. Mitchell, the state police superintendent.jTC Police charged James in yesterday's incident and in an Aug. 5 bomb scare that forced employees from the State House and nearby buildings.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | January 24, 1995
Rix A. Dieffenbach, retired president of a company that manufactured drinking straws, died Saturday of a stroke at his home in Spring Hill, Fla. The former Ruxton resident was 85.Along with his father, Otto W. Dieffenbach, he founded Glassips Inc., makers of cellophane drinking straws, beverage swizzle sticks and other restaurant supplies, in 1933.The elder Mr. Dieffenbach came up with the idea of producing straws after opening a flat tin of cigarettes and winding its cellophane -- introduced into this country in 1927 from France -- around a metal rod on his desk.
FEATURES
By Niki Scott and Niki Scott,Universal Press Syndicate | November 3, 1991
There's no hard evidence that the children of working mothers are more at risk for problems with drugs and/or alcohol abuse than are the children of mothers who work at home full time, all other factors being equal.In her new book, "Kids, Alcohol & Drugs" (Ballantine), Ruth Maxwell advises parents to confront their children immediately if they observe any of the following warning signs:* "Alcohol on a child's breath, slurred words, stumbling, staggering gait, unfocused eyes, rambling or repetitive talk, vomitus with alcohol odor, blackouts."
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Contributing Writer | October 7, 1992
When time is at a minimum, one of the most flavorful ways to prepare a well-rounded meal is Oriental style. One normally thinks of stir-frying for an entire meal in one pan, but this version is a contemporary feat in efficiency. It makes use of the microwave, combined with stovetop sauteing (or searing) for browning.Bean threads, or cellophane noodles as they are often called, are a favorite pasta substitute in Oriental and Asian cuisines. The base of this noodle is the mung bean, rather than grain flour, and when plumped, they become translucent, with a very interesting texture.
FEATURES
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 3, 2005
The holidays can be an especially dangerous time for pets, with parties, lots of people and possibly lethal plants and foods all around the house. The spirits of the season, as in alcoholic drinks, are also highly dangerous, warns the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center. Taking a few precautions will help the festive season float by disaster-free. Here are tips: Ask your guests to put beverages where animals can't reach them. Alcohol can make animals sick, weak and cause a coma. Keep chocolates in a safe place.
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