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BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | March 19, 1996
A Connecticut biotechnology company has agreed to buy Cellmark Diagnostics, the Germantown firm that drew national attention for its DNA testing of blood samples for the prosecution in the O. J. Simpson case.Lifecodes Corp., based in Stamford, Conn., declined to say how much it would pay the British biotechnology company Zeneca Group PLC for its U.S. Cellmark unit, the nation's largest private forensic DNA testing firm.The agreement calls for Lifecodes to license the Cellmark name for use in the United States.
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NEWS
By Nancy A. Youssef and Nancy A. Youssef,SUN STAFF | December 27, 1999
Baltimore County police have become part of an elite group of law enforcement agencies nationwide able to conduct a sophisticated form of DNA testing that gives them a faster, more precise way of identifying a suspect.That system -- a form of which was used to test evidence in the White House sex scandal -- is important to county prosecutors in court: It gives them the certainty that a suspect's DNA matches the evidence found at a crime scene."I think jurors are clamoring for it. I think it is accepted," said Lynnda Tomorie Watson, a forensic chemist for the Police Department's Forensic Services Section.
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BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | July 16, 1997
Cellmark Diagnostics Inc., a DNA forensics firm that has worked on celebrated investigations including the JonBenet Ramsey and O. J. Simpson cases, said yesterday that it has decided to remain in Montgomery County and has signed a 10-year lease at its present facility.Howard County and Prince George's County competed to lure fast-growing Cellmark away from Montgomery.But the privately held forensics company was persuaded to remain in Montgomery County by a financial incentive package that included a $45,000 county grant to help offset expansion costs, said Mark Stolorow, Cellmark's director of operations.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | July 16, 1997
Cellmark Diagnostics Inc., a DNA forensics firm that has worked on celebrated investigations including the JonBenet Ramsey and O. J. Simpson cases, said yesterday that it has decided to remain in Montgomery County and has signed a 10-year lease at its present facility.Howard County and Prince George's County competed to lure fast-growing Cellmark away from Montgomery.But the privately held forensics company was persuaded to remain in Montgomery County by a financial incentive package that included a $45,000 county grant to help offset expansion costs, said Mark Stolorow, Cellmark's director of operations.
NEWS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Sun Staff Writer | July 22, 1994
GERMANTOWN -- At a laboratory inside an anonymous-looking industrial park in rural Maryland, scientists may soon take delivery of a box containing a bloody glove and strands of O. J. Simpson's hair.Managers at Cellmark Diagnostics are keeping mum. But since the local division of the British giant Zeneca Group PLC is the genetic tester of choice for the Los Angeles Police Department, Cellmark is likely to be the lab that helps solve the year's most notorious murder mystery.Whoever does the tests, though, an expected challenge by Mr. Simpson's lawyers of the DNA "fingerprinting" biotechnology used here could influence the use of similar tests in thousands of other criminal cases nationwide.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | September 29, 1995
Karen Hiebler had been working at a Mars supermarket on Holabird Avenue for 10 years when the company asked her to take a random drug test last fall. No problem, she thought.Big problem, she found out. The test came back showing a urine sample chock-full of PCP, something the bakery manager insisted she'd never taken in her life. She was fired that day. But five months later, Ms. Hiebler says, she received the results she had expected: A different lab determined through DNA testing that the sample wasn't hers.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 11, 1997
GERMANTOWN -- The deliveries that arrive at this quiet, nondescript suite, tucked away in a shoe box of an office building just off Interstate 270, are anything but nondescript: A hair. A bloodstained swatch of fabric. A lipstick-smudged cigarette butt. A torn fingernail. An ax.They are all remnants of sordid episodes of murder, rape, acts of betrayal.Each item will be combed for a trace of human life, a genetic calling card that can be used to help answer such questions as: "Who killed JonBenet Ramsey?"
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | October 16, 1992
Also in Friday's Howard section, a story on the trial of Joh Daniel Kelly should have said the prosecution requested a postponement because a witness was not available.The Baltimore Sun regrets the errors.Prosecutors will be permitted to use DNA evidence in trials of two men charged with multiple counts of rape, a Howard Circuit Court judge has ruled.The attorney for the two men, who are charged in separate cases, argued the evidence is unreliable and should be barred because it would violate their constitutional rights.
NEWS
By Kim Clark | August 23, 1994
What is DNA "fingerprinting"?Testers dissolve blood stains found at the scene of a crime in a test tube with a chemical that extracts DNA, which carries each individual's unique genetic code. They fix the DNA to a membrane, then soak it in a radioactive solution that sticks only where it finds certain genetic sequences.Then, the technicians place a piece of X-ray film on the membrane, and stick the two in a deep freezer, which speeds up the radiation's exposure of the sequence's pattern on the film.
NEWS
By Nancy A. Youssef and Nancy A. Youssef,SUN STAFF | December 27, 1999
Baltimore County police have become part of an elite group of law enforcement agencies nationwide able to conduct a sophisticated form of DNA testing that gives them a faster, more precise way of identifying a suspect.That system -- a form of which was used to test evidence in the White House sex scandal -- is important to county prosecutors in court: It gives them the certainty that a suspect's DNA matches the evidence found at a crime scene."I think jurors are clamoring for it. I think it is accepted," said Lynnda Tomorie Watson, a forensic chemist for the Police Department's Forensic Services Section.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 11, 1997
GERMANTOWN -- The deliveries that arrive at this quiet, nondescript suite, tucked away in a shoe box of an office building just off Interstate 270, are anything but nondescript: A hair. A bloodstained swatch of fabric. A lipstick-smudged cigarette butt. A torn fingernail. An ax.They are all remnants of sordid episodes of murder, rape, acts of betrayal.Each item will be combed for a trace of human life, a genetic calling card that can be used to help answer such questions as: "Who killed JonBenet Ramsey?"
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | March 19, 1996
A Connecticut biotechnology company has agreed to buy Cellmark Diagnostics, the Germantown firm that drew national attention for its DNA testing of blood samples for the prosecution in the O. J. Simpson case.Lifecodes Corp., based in Stamford, Conn., declined to say how much it would pay the British biotechnology company Zeneca Group PLC for its U.S. Cellmark unit, the nation's largest private forensic DNA testing firm.The agreement calls for Lifecodes to license the Cellmark name for use in the United States.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | September 29, 1995
Karen Hiebler had been working at a Mars supermarket on Holabird Avenue for 10 years when the company asked her to take a random drug test last fall. No problem, she thought.Big problem, she found out. The test came back showing a urine sample chock-full of PCP, something the bakery manager insisted she'd never taken in her life. She was fired that day. But five months later, Ms. Hiebler says, she received the results she had expected: A different lab determined through DNA testing that the sample wasn't hers.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff Writer | February 23, 1995
DNA from a drinking glass in the home where two lawyers were shot to death in May may be used against Scotland E. Williams when he is tried in the slayings next week, an Anne Arundel circuit judge ruled yesterday.Judge Eugene M. Lerner ruled that the kind of test used on DNA scraped from one of three drinking glasses taken by police from the victims' weekend home is acceptable enough to scientists that it may be used in Mr. Williams' trial.Mr. Williams, 31, of the 800 block of Bradford Ave. in Arnold could be sentenced to death if convicted in the killing of Jose E. Trias, 49, and his wife, Julie Noel Gilbert, 48, both Washington lawyers.
NEWS
By Kim Clark | August 23, 1994
What is DNA "fingerprinting"?Testers dissolve blood stains found at the scene of a crime in a test tube with a chemical that extracts DNA, which carries each individual's unique genetic code. They fix the DNA to a membrane, then soak it in a radioactive solution that sticks only where it finds certain genetic sequences.Then, the technicians place a piece of X-ray film on the membrane, and stick the two in a deep freezer, which speeds up the radiation's exposure of the sequence's pattern on the film.
NEWS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Sun Staff Writer | July 22, 1994
GERMANTOWN -- At a laboratory inside an anonymous-looking industrial park in rural Maryland, scientists may soon take delivery of a box containing a bloody glove and strands of O. J. Simpson's hair.Managers at Cellmark Diagnostics are keeping mum. But since the local division of the British giant Zeneca Group PLC is the genetic tester of choice for the Los Angeles Police Department, Cellmark is likely to be the lab that helps solve the year's most notorious murder mystery.Whoever does the tests, though, an expected challenge by Mr. Simpson's lawyers of the DNA "fingerprinting" biotechnology used here could influence the use of similar tests in thousands of other criminal cases nationwide.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff Writer | February 23, 1995
DNA from a drinking glass in the home where two lawyers were shot to death in May may be used against Scotland E. Williams when he is tried in the slayings next week, an Anne Arundel circuit judge ruled yesterday.Judge Eugene M. Lerner ruled that the kind of test used on DNA scraped from one of three drinking glasses taken by police from the victims' weekend home is acceptable enough to scientists that it may be used in Mr. Williams' trial.Mr. Williams, 31, of the 800 block of Bradford Ave. in Arnold could be sentenced to death if convicted in the killing of Jose E. Trias, 49, and his wife, Julie Noel Gilbert, 48, both Washington lawyers.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | November 18, 2004
Orchid Cellmark, a Montgomery County-based laboratory that has analyzed DNA for such high-profile cases as the O.J. Simpson trial and the JonBenet Ramsey murder, has fired an analyst for allegedly falsifying test data - setting off a scramble by defense attorneys to review evidence in the affected cases. The incident mars an otherwise stellar reputation for Cellmark, a pioneer in the burgeoning field of solving crimes through the analysis of trace genetic material, known as deoxyribonucleic acid, left on evidence.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | October 16, 1992
Also in Friday's Howard section, a story on the trial of Joh Daniel Kelly should have said the prosecution requested a postponement because a witness was not available.The Baltimore Sun regrets the errors.Prosecutors will be permitted to use DNA evidence in trials of two men charged with multiple counts of rape, a Howard Circuit Court judge has ruled.The attorney for the two men, who are charged in separate cases, argued the evidence is unreliable and should be barred because it would violate their constitutional rights.
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