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Cell Phones

NEWS
November 7, 1997
CELLULAR PHONES for school buses are a good idea that's overdue. As long as their use is limited to real emergencies and important business communications, wireless telephones can pay off in the improved transportation of school children and better safety.Cell phones are becoming cheaper by the month. Service contracts are highly competitive. What was prohibitive in cost just a few years ago is now affordable and available.These phones should provide peace of mind for parents, as well as for the bus drivers.
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NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 19, 2004
BEIJING - In the hottest movie in China this winter, Cell Phone, a dejected girlfriend quietly confronts her lover with an incriminating photograph, a picture sent electronically to his cellular phone while he was out. It's a sad moment of truth in the darkly comic drama, but not everyone at a recent screening could hear all the dialogue. During the scene, three cell phones started ringing loudly, and the phones were answered - reminding the audience that no matter what's going on in China, somebody will be talking over it, during it and about it on their phones.
TOPIC
By Margie Wylie | August 12, 2001
The first disposable cellular telephones won't hit the market until fall, but environmentalists are already concerned about the toxic trash that millions of chat-and-chuck phones could generate. Going for as little as $30, these pocket-sized phones will be sold over the counters of convenience stores, gas stations and drug stores without credit checks or contract agreements. The basic phones have no display and no dial pad, and can only make outgoing calls using voice recognition. When the minutes are up, the phones can be tossed or, sometimes, returned for recycling.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | April 5, 2001
In the past six months, 16-year-old Katie McDonald has collected 50 cellular phones. They are not for the Severna Park teen-ager to use to chatter away the day. They are part of a newly coordinated effort in Anne Arundel County to get mobile telephones to victims of domestic violence who fear that their abusers will attack them again. Yesterday, Katie, an 11th-grader at Severna Park High School, joined with county officials and a wireless phone service to start a program to collect donated telephones.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 31, 1999
For septuagenarians Bea and Roland, the frequent drives to Johnson City, Tenn., to visit their son are long and a bit frightening, but a borrowed cellular phone will ease their minds on the next trip.The couple borrowed their phone from the Carroll County State's Attorney's Office. The office has 40 free "loaner" cell phones available for seniors who wish to feel secure when they travel."Driving along miles and miles of remote highway made me think about what would happen if we had some sort of problem," said Bea, 70, who lives in Carroll County.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | May 31, 2007
Paul Palmieri has the sort of gleam in his eye usually reserved for new parents about to pull out pictures of their progeny. But instead of photographs, he takes his mobile phone from his pocket, flips it open and scoots his chair a little closer. On the screen is a 2007 Pontiac G6. He pushes a button, and color options appear. He pushes again, and tire rim choices float into view. Soon, fully outfitted, the car drives off, and Palmieri beams. He's clearly still something of a proud papa, except his baby is a year-old company - Baltimore's Millennial Media Inc. - working to put commercials, such as the Pontiac demo, on cell phones.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | November 8, 2009
The Ulman administration is preparing to cut back on cell phone use by Howard County government employees - a move expected to save the county up to $500,000 a year, top county officials said. "We're using this process department by department to take a fresh look at how they communicate," County Executive Ken Ulman told a recent meeting of the Compensation Commission, a citizens group appointed to recommend salaries for elected officials chosen in next year's election. Council members and Ulman have told the commission that cell phone use - especially involving e-mails - has spiked since their election in 2006, making their jobs more difficult and demanding.
NEWS
By Karen Kaplan and Karen Kaplan,Los Angeles Times | January 5, 2008
Researchers at the University of Utah have found that motorists talking on cell phones drive more hesitantly than undistracted drivers and, as a result, are increasing everyone's average drive time by 5 percent to 10 percent. For someone with a two-hour round-trip commute, that means as much as 12 extra minutes behind the wheel each day. Over the course of a year, the excess time in traffic easily could top 50 hours. "On your commute home tonight, your commute will be slower because of people who are using their cell phones," said psychologist Dave Strayer, whose findings will be presented Jan. 16 at the annual meeting of the Transportation Research Board, which is part of the National Academies.
BUSINESS
By Chris Cobbs and Chris Cobbs,ORLANDO SENTINEL | June 17, 2004
PC users have battled file-stealing, computer-crashing worms and viruses for years, but the cyberwar may be shifting to a new front - to "smart phones," which combine a cell phone with PC-like powers. This week, a group of Eastern European virus writers unveiled a sample of a virus that can spread from one mobile phone to another over a short-range wireless connection. The worm, named Cabir, is harmless, but it could pave the way for a new generation of bugs that may prove as troublesome as familiar PC worms like Love Bug and Sasser, security experts said.
NEWS
By Erika Hobbs and Erika Hobbs,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 6, 2003
The technology that promises to keep people connected can leave Harford County 911 operators hanging on the line. Cell phones - a kind of modern-day life preserver - befuddle the county's dispatching system. They clog lines with unattended, accidental calls. And, when there is an emergency, cell phones leave no trace of who is calling or from where. "The pluses [of cell phones] far outweigh the minuses right now, but we just do not have the same level of service for wireless callers that we do for wired ones," said Scott Whitney, executive director for the state Emergency Numbers System Board in Baltimore.
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