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NEWS
October 7, 2002
THE WHISPER campaign being waged by Nancy Reagan these days might surprise her former critics. Then again, anyone who has lived with a loved one suffering from Alzheimer's disease wouldn't be surprised by the former first lady's actions. In her own quiet but forceful way, Mrs. Reagan has been lobbying for an overhaul of the Bush administration's restrictive policy on embryonic stem cell research. Her efforts come at an opportune time as scientists raise concerns about the limits of the Bush policy and the impact on America's dominance in the field.
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HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2013
Even as they celebrate clearing a legal hurdle, worries of stem cell research grant money evaporating constantly weigh on scientists like Dr. Ted Dawson, whose projects at Johns Hopkins Hospital have helped inform treatment of neurological diseases like Parkinson's and Alzheimer's. A three-year court battle by two researchers to stop stem cell research using human embryos ended Monday when the Supreme Court declined to review the case. Scientists like Dawson say that frees up grant opportunities and are relieved — for now. "It takes some of the uncertainty out," Dawson said.
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NEWS
August 12, 2001
IN APPROVING federal funding for embryonic stem cell research, President Bush cleverly walked a tight line of politics and principles on a complex biomedical and moral issue. The decision allows funding for work on existing stem cell lines to search for cures to a wide range of diseases and physical defects. The president will create a council to develop federal guidelines and monitor this promising research, which has been privately funded, often secret and without regulation. But the limits imposed by a cautious Mr. Bush, excluding any new stem cell lines developed from embryos, will slow the pace of scientific discovery.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | July 25, 2008
Osiris Therapeutics' shareholders approved yesterday the sale of the stem cell drugmaker's only product line, a bone-regeneration treatment called Osteocel, in a transaction worth up to $137 million, which will be used for the company's next generation of drugs. In April, Columbia-based Osiris announced plans to find a buyer for the business. It secured a deal with San Diego's NuVasive Inc. in May. The funds will be used to further Osiris' core business: developing biologic drug candidates in the inflammatory, orthopedic, and cardiovascular areas from mesenchymal stem cells.
NEWS
March 11, 2004
PRESIDENT BUSH'S carefully crafted compromise on stem cell research appears to be defeating his purpose. By permitting federal funds to be used only for research on existing stem cell lines, the president had hoped to discourage, if not curtail altogether, the creation of human embryos for the sole purpose of experimenting on them. His goal, announced in August 2001, was to allow the development of potentially lifesaving cures while drawing a moral and ethical line to protect the sanctity of human life.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | February 17, 2005
WASHINGTON - Less than a year after similar legislation died in Congress, lawmakers introduced a bipartisan bill in both chambers yesterday that would promote embryonic stem cell research to help find cures for diseases such as cancer and Alzheimer's. The legislation would expand the number of stem cell lines derived from unused in vitro embryos that are available for federally funded research. Under current federal policy, only stem cell lines created before Aug. 9, 2001, are eligible for federal funds, but the bill's authors said that most of the 22 available stem cell lines have been contaminated with mouse cells and are of little use to researchers.
NEWS
By JILL ZUCKMAN and JILL ZUCKMAN,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 19, 2006
WASHINGTON -- In a rare rebuke, Congress defied President Bush yesterday, sending him legislation that would give scientists broader access to embryonic stem cell lines for federally funded research into an array of illnesses and conditions from spinal cord injuries to Alzheimer's, diabetes to Parkinson's disease. Without ceremony, Bush is expected to quietly veto the measure today. It would be his first veto during 5 1/2 years in office, though he has threatened to exercise that power 141 times.
NEWS
By Sheila Derman | March 3, 2005
MARYLAND IS at the center of an important national debate over embryonic stem cell research because of legislation introduced in the General Assembly that would authorize this pioneering science and provide $25 million in state funds annually to support it. The timing for this legislation - introduced by Sen. Paula C. Hollinger of Baltimore County and Del. Samuel I. Rosenberg of Baltimore, both Democrats - could not be better. It would be financed with money from the Cigarette Restitution Fund.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Ellen Gamerman and Susan Baer and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 10, 2001
WASHINGTON - In reaching for a middle ground in his decision to allow federal funding for only existing embryonic stem cell lines, President Bush left many on both sides of the issue dissatisfied, others mildly heartened and some simply confused. Those who support research on stem cells derived from embryos, such as the research community and patients' advocates, say they are relieved that Bush did not ban federal funding completely but not pleased with the limits. They say those limits could slow research into potential cures for many debilitating diseases.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 9, 2005
WASHINGTON - Scientists urged senators yesterday to join the House in passing a measure to expand embryonic stem cell research, arguing that newer, uncontaminated cell lines now available cannot be used by federally funded investigators under President Bush's policy. A hearing, held by the Special Committee on Aging, was the first in the Senate since the House passed stem cell legislation late last month in defiance of Bush's veto threat. The House bill would allow federally funded research on thousands of frozen embryos that are stored in fertility centers and donated by couples who no longer need them.
NEWS
By Jill Zuckman and Jill Zuckman,Chicgo Tribune | January 12, 2007
WASHINGTON -- After an emotional day of debate in which lawmakers invoked their own medical tragedies and those of families, friends and constituents, the House of Representatives voted yesterday to expand federally funded embryonic stem cell research. The vote was 253-174, short of what is necessary to override a promised presidential veto. But the third major piece of legislation to pass the House this week fulfilled a key campaign promise Democrats made on their path to winning the majority.
NEWS
By MICHAEL TANNER | July 20, 2006
President Bush yesterday vetoed a bill that would have provided federal funding for research on new lines of stem cells. The debate leading up to Mr. Bush's first veto was divisive, emotional, replete with misinformation from both sides - and totally unnecessary. Despite the impression left by some of its supporters, stem cell research is not banned. In fact, not only is it legal, it is thriving in the private sector. There are at least 11 private stem cell research centers at universities and medical centers across the country.
NEWS
By JILL ZUCKMAN and JILL ZUCKMAN,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 19, 2006
WASHINGTON -- In a rare rebuke, Congress defied President Bush yesterday, sending him legislation that would give scientists broader access to embryonic stem cell lines for federally funded research into an array of illnesses and conditions from spinal cord injuries to Alzheimer's, diabetes to Parkinson's disease. Without ceremony, Bush is expected to quietly veto the measure today. It would be his first veto during 5 1/2 years in office, though he has threatened to exercise that power 141 times.
NEWS
April 2, 2006
The recent passage of the Maryland Stem Cell Act of 2006 represented the rare convergence of good public policy with good politics. The outcome reflects well on both the General Assembly's Democratic majority and Republican Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., who has indicated he will sign the bill. There was even a measure of compromise involved, a rarity in Annapolis. But such election-year machinations are trivial compared with the measure's larger significance: Maryland is set to become a full-fledged investor in the burgeoning field of embryonic stem cell research.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 30, 2005
South Korean cloning pioneer Hwang Woo Suk never made any of the 11 stem cell lines he claimed were derived from the DNA of sick and injured patients, an expert panel investigating the scientist said yesterday. Roe Jung Hye, Seoul National University's research chief, said the panel could find no evidence for any of the claims in a blockbuster study Hwang published in May. The research was hailed then as a milestone in treating patients with spinal cord injuries and diseases such as diabetes.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN AND JONATHAN BOR and DENNIS O'BRIEN AND JONATHAN BOR,SUN REPORTERS | December 17, 2005
A prominent South Korean scientist accused of falsifying breakthroughs in stem cell research stood by his conclusions yesterday but asked a scientific journal to retract the paper on his findings because of technical errors. Hwang Woo Suck, lead author of an article in the journal Science reporting that his team had created stem cells from 11 patients through cloning, said at a news conference yesterday that he would duplicate the results to prove that the process works. Though he denied allegations that most of the cells didn't exist, he asked for the retraction because the same photographs were used in some cases to represent different patient stem cells.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN AND JONATHAN BOR and DENNIS O'BRIEN AND JONATHAN BOR,SUN REPORTERS | December 17, 2005
A prominent South Korean scientist accused of falsifying breakthroughs in stem cell research stood by his conclusions yesterday but asked a scientific journal to retract the paper on his findings because of technical errors. Hwang Woo Suck, lead author of an article in the journal Science reporting that his team had created stem cells from 11 patients through cloning, said at a news conference yesterday that he would duplicate the results to prove that the process works. Though he denied allegations that most of the cells didn't exist, he asked for the retraction because the same photographs were used in some cases to represent different patient stem cells.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | May 20, 2005
South Korean scientists say they have created the first stem cells that match the DNA of patients suffering from specific diseases, a development that could lead to treatments for ailments including Alzheimer's and diabetes. In doing so, the Koreans vastly improved the efficiency of the technique they used to make history last year by cloning a human embryo. Instead of producing a single batch of stem cells from one embryo, this year's effort produced 11 lines of custom stem cells that could eventually be used for treatment or as tools for research into a variety of crippling or fatal diseases, according to an article in today's issue of the journal Science.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 9, 2005
WASHINGTON - Scientists urged senators yesterday to join the House in passing a measure to expand embryonic stem cell research, arguing that newer, uncontaminated cell lines now available cannot be used by federally funded investigators under President Bush's policy. A hearing, held by the Special Committee on Aging, was the first in the Senate since the House passed stem cell legislation late last month in defiance of Bush's veto threat. The House bill would allow federally funded research on thousands of frozen embryos that are stored in fertility centers and donated by couples who no longer need them.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | May 20, 2005
South Korean scientists say they have created the first stem cells that match the DNA of patients suffering from specific diseases, a development that could lead to treatments for ailments including Alzheimer's and diabetes. In doing so, the Koreans vastly improved the efficiency of the technique they used to make history last year by cloning a human embryo. Instead of producing a single batch of stem cells from one embryo, this year's effort produced 11 lines of custom stem cells that could eventually be used for treatment or as tools for research into a variety of crippling or fatal diseases, according to an article in today's issue of the journal Science.
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