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NEWS
April 28, 1991
The annual walk-a-thon to raise funds for research to cure sickle cell anemia will take place Sunday, May 19.Registration for the 30-kilometer walk will begin at 7 a.m. at Hillsdale Elementary School, Edmund Street, in Aberdeen.Participants will solicit pledges for each kilometer completed.This year's poster child is Calvin Carter, 2. His favorite food is spaghetti, says his mother, Spec. Caroline Showell, of the Ordnance Center and School, Aberdeen Proving Ground.Calvin is a victim of ablood disease for which there has yet to be found a cure.
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HEALTH
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2012
Halfway around the world in India, Sivaprakash Ramalingam had heard of Johns Hopkins researchers using a promising new technique for gene therapy that he hoped to integrate with stem cells to cure diseases. After getting a doctorate in biochemistry in his native country, he came to Baltimore four years ago to study under the technique's pioneer, Srinivasan Chandrasegaran, at Hopkins' Bloomberg School of Public Health. Ramalingam's research has led him down the path of seeking a cure for sickle cell anemia, a painful, life-shortening blood disorder that afflicts many in his home region in southern India.
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HEALTH
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2012
Halfway around the world in India, Sivaprakash Ramalingam had heard of Johns Hopkins researchers using a promising new technique for gene therapy that he hoped to integrate with stem cells to cure diseases. After getting a doctorate in biochemistry in his native country, he came to Baltimore four years ago to study under the technique's pioneer, Srinivasan Chandrasegaran, at Hopkins' Bloomberg School of Public Health. Ramalingam's research has led him down the path of seeking a cure for sickle cell anemia, a painful, life-shortening blood disorder that afflicts many in his home region in southern India.
NEWS
By Karen Kaplan and Karen Kaplan,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 7, 2007
Taking the next step in a series of breakthrough stem-cell experiments, scientists have cured sickle- cell anemia in mice by rewinding their skin cells to an embryonic state and manipulating them to create healthy, genetically matched replacement tissue. After the repaired cells were transfused into the animals, they soon began producing healthy blood cells free of the crippling deformities that deprive organs of oxygen, scientists from the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research in Cambridge, Mass.
NEWS
By Annette Stainhouse | August 27, 1991
Joan Wise suffers from sickle cell anemia. As a child, "I saw the hospital more than I saw my home," she says. "I was always scared because I never knew when I was going to experience another crisis. It's like a bad toothache, or worse."Pain has tormented her physically and mentally. She has difficulty keeping a job and medical insurance."I was never able to keep a job because of my illness. There is no fair warning as to when you are going to get sick," she says.Ms. Wise, who lives in northwest Baltimore, has two sons, 12 and 19, who have the sickle cell trait.
FEATURES
By Dr. Neil Solomon and Dr. Neil Solomon,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | December 10, 1991
Dear Dr. Solomon: Would you please discuss sickle cellanemia? I know that it's inherited, but I'm trying to find out what the chances are in a particular situation. -- Mark, Owings Mills, Md.Dear Mark: First, let me distinguish between sickle cell anemia and sickle cell trait. A child who inherits a sickle cell gene from each parent will have sickle cell anemia. A child who inherits a sickle cell gene from only one parent will have sickle cell trait. A person may have sickle cell trait and not even be aware of it because there are no related symptoms.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 20, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Researchers have discovered that a drug being examined as a cancer therapy may also turn out to be a non-toxic treatment for sickle cell anemia and related blood disorders.Scientists at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and the National Cancer Institute said yesterday that the drug, which is commonly used for rare metabolic disorders in children, has been found to increase production of a fetal type of hemoglobin that is beneficial to sickle cell patients.The researchers said they know of no other drug that produces such a high level of fetal hemoglobin, and they are excited about its potential for treating patients who suffer from inherited anemias.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2000
PHILADELPHIA -- When the game is on the line, Temple's Mark Karcher knows the ball will be in his hands. He can drive to the basket, spot up for a three-pointer or try a pull-up jumper from the foul line. So many options, so much control. But there's another side to the former Baltimore high school basketball standout, a personal ordeal that has left Karcher feeling powerless. His 17-month-old daughter, Aria, has sickle cell anemia. It's an inherited, chronic disease in which the misshapen red blood cells function abnormally and lead to sudden, painful episodes affecting the bones of the back, chest and abdomen.
BUSINESS
By A Sun Staff Writer | April 19, 1995
Oncor Inc., which two years ago launched a subsidiary to commercialize gene identification breakthroughs by Johns Hopkins University researchers, has formed a second subsidiary commercialize gene therapy research from Yale and Princeton universities.Stephen Turner, Oncor's chairman and chief executive officer, said yesterday that his company had formed OncorPharm Inc., which will search for ways to treat genetic diseases such as sickle cell anemia.OncorPharm, which has 10 employees in offices a few blocks away from Oncor's Gaithersburg headquarters, has been in development for about a year, Mr. Turner said.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | December 13, 1998
ATLANTA -- Medical history unfolded at Egleston Children's Hospital on Friday at noon with the world's first umbilical cord blood transplant for sickle cell anemia.As a syringe of dark red blood plunged into the intravenous line of Keone Penn, relatives and friends bowed their heads in prayer and talked of miracles, cures and gratitude.They also gently told the center of attention to wake up."Hey, Keone. God's working it out just like we said. Wake up and see your miracle happening," said Beverly Kennedy, a close friend of Leslie Penn, Keone's mother.
NEWS
March 18, 2007
AACC culinary team competes The Anne Arundel Community College student culinary team, Team Anne Arundel, placed fourth at the American Culinary Federation Northeast Regional Conference's student competition. The team competed March 2 and 3 at the conference in Pittsburgh, which attracted 700 chefs and cooks for workshops, exhibits and competitions. The student teams completed a cold food display, demonstrated their butchery and knife skills and prepared a four-course signature meal. The winner, a team from the State University of New York at Delhi, will represent the region at the ACF national conference in July in Florida.
NEWS
August 26, 2006
Vernon Ingram, 82, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor whose landmark discovery on the cause of sickle cell anemia made him a pioneer in the field of molecular biology, died Aug. 17 in Boston after a fall. In 1957, he discovered that a single amino acid substitution is responsible for the molecular abnormality that leads to sickle cell anemia. In recent years, he had focused on neuroscience, especially Alzheimer's disease. Born in Breslau, Germany, he studied at Birkbeck College at the University of London, where he earned his bachelor's degree in chemistry in 1945 and doctorate in organic chemistry in 1949.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2005
Mary Clayburn White, a pioneer of gospel radio who helped transform Baltimore's market into one of the country's largest, died of bone marrow cancer Wednesday at St. Agnes HealthCare. She was 71. With a warm, motherly voice, Mrs. White played spirituals, conducted interviews and served as an advocate for African-Americans on several AM and FM radio stations during a career that spanned three decades. "Back when she first started doing it, there were no 24-hour gospel stations," said Lee Michaels, who worked with her at "Heaven 600" WCAO-AM, one of two round-the-clock gospel stations in Baltimore.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2000
PHILADELPHIA -- When the game is on the line, Temple's Mark Karcher knows the ball will be in his hands. He can drive to the basket, spot up for a three-pointer or try a pull-up jumper from the foul line. So many options, so much control. But there's another side to the former Baltimore high school basketball standout, a personal ordeal that has left Karcher feeling powerless. His 17-month-old daughter, Aria, has sickle cell anemia. It's an inherited, chronic disease in which the misshapen red blood cells function abnormally and lead to sudden, painful episodes affecting the bones of the back, chest and abdomen.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | December 13, 1998
ATLANTA -- Medical history unfolded at Egleston Children's Hospital on Friday at noon with the world's first umbilical cord blood transplant for sickle cell anemia.As a syringe of dark red blood plunged into the intravenous line of Keone Penn, relatives and friends bowed their heads in prayer and talked of miracles, cures and gratitude.They also gently told the center of attention to wake up."Hey, Keone. God's working it out just like we said. Wake up and see your miracle happening," said Beverly Kennedy, a close friend of Leslie Penn, Keone's mother.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 7, 1996
I am 16 years old and have been told I have sickle cell trait. What is it and will I get sick?All human red blood cells contain hemoglobin, a protein that binds with oxygen and "carries" the oxygen to all parts of the body.Each hemoglobin molecule has two alpha and two beta chains. The production of these chains is controlled by an individual's genes. An individual has two genes (called beta globin genes) that control production of the beta chains, one from his/her mother and one from his/her father.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,Sun Staff | December 22, 1995
As a crowd of proud and tearful relatives looked on, Johns Hopkins physicians unveiled a bronze plaque yesterday dedicated to the memory of a Baltimore sickle cell patient who was willing to try any drug, risk any side effect, to further sickle cell anemia research.John L. Paul Jr., 42, known as "Dean" by the many who lovedhim, died in July after enduring years of the disease's terrible pain and crippling side effects.It was Mr. Paul's partnership with Dr. Samuel Charache during 28 years that led to the discovery this year of the first effective treatment for sickle cell, the drug hydroxyurea.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2005
Mary Clayburn White, a pioneer of gospel radio who helped transform Baltimore's market into one of the country's largest, died of bone marrow cancer Wednesday at St. Agnes HealthCare. She was 71. With a warm, motherly voice, Mrs. White played spirituals, conducted interviews and served as an advocate for African-Americans on several AM and FM radio stations during a career that spanned three decades. "Back when she first started doing it, there were no 24-hour gospel stations," said Lee Michaels, who worked with her at "Heaven 600" WCAO-AM, one of two round-the-clock gospel stations in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,Sun Staff | December 22, 1995
As a crowd of proud and tearful relatives looked on, Johns Hopkins physicians unveiled a bronze plaque yesterday dedicated to the memory of a Baltimore sickle cell patient who was willing to try any drug, risk any side effect, to further sickle cell anemia research.John L. Paul Jr., 42, known as "Dean" by the many who lovedhim, died in July after enduring years of the disease's terrible pain and crippling side effects.It was Mr. Paul's partnership with Dr. Samuel Charache during 28 years that led to the discovery this year of the first effective treatment for sickle cell, the drug hydroxyurea.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,Sun Staff Writer | July 19, 1995
One by one, in the stifling heat, they came to pay their respects. They used walkers, leaned on canes and hung onto each other.John Paul was dead. And no one could believe it.For while the Baltimore man, 42, had long endured the terrible pain of sickle cell anemia, he had deflected attention from his disabling medical problem. Earlier this year, he shared the triumph of the Johns Hopkins physicians who made a breakthrough discovery after years of using him as a research subject.In the midst of it all, he had managed to care for others.
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