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By Joe and Teresa Graedon | September 7, 2009
Question: : I read your article about celery easing blood pressure. I don't have high blood pressure, but I swear that celery helped cure my Bell's palsy. Several years ago, I was diagnosed with Bell's palsy and was horrified when my specialist told me that it could last from three months to three years. The first few days I rarely slept because I was searching online for a cure. (There isn't one.) About a week into my search, I found an article about a lady who ate celery several times a day. Her symptoms got better every day. I ate celery several times a day for two weeks and noticed things getting better.
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NEWS
May 18, 2014
Two culinary students in Anne Arundel Community College 's Hotel, Culinary Arts and Tourism Institute won gold medals, and the institute team earned second place at the sixth annual Chesapeake Culinary Cup competition this month at the institute in Glen Burnie . The Chesapeake Culinary Cup is an American Culinary Federation-sanctioned competition open to regional college culinary arts programs. Gold medal winner Michael Willard of Annapolis earned the highest score in the competition with his menu of pan-seared red snapper with citrus beurre blanc, lima bean puree, glazed carrots, orange-scented asparagus and a rice croquette.
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NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,universal press syndicate | January 9, 2000
There's some strategy to making good seafood soup: Use good-quality fish or shellfish, add the ingredients in stages, and don't overcook. Fresh fish and shellfish should be mild-smelling, with no fishy odor or trace of ammonia, and the flesh should feel firm. If you buy previously frozen seafood, be sure it hasn't been defrosted longer than two days. Because a soup made with fish or seafood combines ingredients with varying cooking times, you'll need to add the different items in stages.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Evan Siple | October 22, 2013
I'm more than likely not alone when I say I have a very healthy aversion to tequila. And it's certainly not the fault of tequila; it's my own. I had too many squandered opportunities in the days of my youth shooting bargain basement brands, resulting in sickness or a gag reflex. My apologies to the agave plant and its boozy progeny. I've learned my lesson and will from now on and henceforth always consider tequila when I see a craft cocktail on the list. And Jack's Bistro has the perfect savory cocktail for those who used to be in the same boat: the Sargento Pimiento.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | May 19, 1999
They came to the water's edge carrying aluminum pans that seemed perfect for a sheet of lasagna but were filled instead with a marshy mix of sand, soil and grass. Some slid into too-big chest waders and slipped into the creek, where a biologist dressed like a frogman scooped a handful of brown and green and disappeared beneath the water's surface.One wild celery plant planted, 99,999 to go.That might seem like a lot of celery grass, or it might seem like a pittance when set against the vast waters of the Chesapeake Bay. Either way, the elementary, middle and high school students who yesterday brought their classroom-grown seedlings to Baltimore County's Rocky Point Park were literally delving beneath the surface to learn a lesson in save-the-bay ecology.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | February 25, 2009
Celery root is awfully ugly, but exceptionally tasty. It's a winter vegetable that looks like a softball that was left in a moist basement and sprouted hair. It has a hide thicker than a two-term congressman. It is also known as celeriac. If you get past its bug-ugly superficialities and use a sharp knife to scrape off its skin - it laughs at vegetable peelers - celery root delivers some pleasing and novel flavors. One flavor is similar to that of celery, its distant cousin. While celery is long, green and supple, celeriac is round, dense and stubby.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2000
Frances Vitrano, who was once Baltimore's largest wholesale celery dealer, died Tuesday of heart failure at her Towson home. She was 93. Until she broke her ankle last year, she was office manager at the wholesale produce business she and her husband founded in 1932. They were once the largest purveyors of celery in Baltimore. "She was an excellent businesswoman, but what she was even better at was taking care of her employees," said Rose Geppi Fischer, a co-worker who was hired by Mrs. Vitrano in 1951.
FEATURES
By Orlando Sentinel | February 10, 1991
People from all over the world enjoy vacationing in Florida, and one reason is the great seafood they can get here. Florida is bordered on one side by the Atlantic Ocean and on the other by the Gulf of Mexico, offering a wealth of marine life.Also, during the winter, when farmers in cooler parts of the globe are just planting crops, farmers in subtropical Florida are already harvesting fresh tomatoes, crisp celery and sweet carrots. These products from the sea and land combine in a silky-textured and virtually fat-free soup called Florida red chowder.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff | March 3, 1999
If you're like most of us, you could go to your refrigerator right now and they would be in the bin: carrots, celery and parsley. The "forgotten" produce.You almost always have to buy too much for a single recipe, so you store the leftovers. And they seem to keep forever. Now, it's time to think out of the bin.Carrots, with their bright, sweet taste, celery with its salty crunch and pungent parsley are bold enough to star in dishes of their own. You just need a sprinkling of imagination.We asked several cooks and cookbook authors what they do to give these humble vegetables top billing at mealtime.
NEWS
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | July 5, 2006
Few side dishes divide people like potato salad. We like just enough mayonnaise to coat the hunks of potatoes and chopped celery and onions, but we're open to other recipes as well. While we're sure none of these four orders is as good as your mother's or grandmother's version, each has redeeming qualities. Edmart Delicatessen Inc. 1427 Reisterstown Road, Pikesville -- 410-486-5558 Hours --8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mondays-Saturdays; 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Sundays In and out in --4 minutes This was the only order to include shredded carrots - a tasty addition - with the diced celery and mayonnaise.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman
For The Baltimore Sun
| September 24, 2013
Kathy Blair from Somerset, Ky., was looking for a recipe she had clipped from a magazine years ago and has since lost for an unusual meatloaf. She said this meatloaf mixture was rolled out flat; mashed potatoes and chopped celery leaves were spread over the mixture and then it was rolled up jellyroll-style. It was then baked and when cooled slightly it could be sliced and the slices resembled pinwheels. I located a recipe on a food blog called DiaryofaCraftyCook.com that sounded very similar to what Blair had described.
SPORTS
August 26, 2013
(Courtesy of Jenny Perez) Step one 1 cup of quinoa 2 cups water 1 tsp turmeric 1 tsp pink salt (Pink or Himalayan salt. You can use regular table salt as well.) Place quinoa, salt, turmeric, and water in a 1-1/2 quart saucepan and bring to a boil. Reduce to a simmer, cover and cook until all the water is absorbed (about 15 minutes). Set aside to cool. Step two 2 carrots, peeled and chopped 1 stalk minced celery 1/4 cup finely diced red onion 1/4 cup fresh chopped cilantro 1 teaspoon cumin powder    Pinch of cayenne Place chopped veggies in a bowl.
NEWS
By Joe and Teresa Graedon | September 7, 2009
Question: : I read your article about celery easing blood pressure. I don't have high blood pressure, but I swear that celery helped cure my Bell's palsy. Several years ago, I was diagnosed with Bell's palsy and was horrified when my specialist told me that it could last from three months to three years. The first few days I rarely slept because I was searching online for a cure. (There isn't one.) About a week into my search, I found an article about a lady who ate celery several times a day. Her symptoms got better every day. I ate celery several times a day for two weeks and noticed things getting better.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | February 25, 2009
Celery root is awfully ugly, but exceptionally tasty. It's a winter vegetable that looks like a softball that was left in a moist basement and sprouted hair. It has a hide thicker than a two-term congressman. It is also known as celeriac. If you get past its bug-ugly superficialities and use a sharp knife to scrape off its skin - it laughs at vegetable peelers - celery root delivers some pleasing and novel flavors. One flavor is similar to that of celery, its distant cousin. While celery is long, green and supple, celeriac is round, dense and stubby.
NEWS
By Donna Pierce | April 30, 2008
I once heard the founder of Glory Foods, the late Bill Williams, justify cooking with his company's Southern-inspired canned greens in a way that made me forever stop apologizing for shortcuts: "These won't be as good as the `Sunday best' greens you remember your mother making, but I guarantee they'll be the best Tuesday-night greens you ever rushed to prepare." I make the same claim for this recipe laced with my best weekday shortcuts. This quick fix has been known to draw raves from hungry family and friends as a quick weekday dinner.
NEWS
By Jill Wendholt Silva and Jill Wendholt Silva,McClatchy-Tribune | March 21, 2007
When it comes to cabbage, think pink. Cabbage contains indoles, a chemical that can rid the body of excess estrogen, lowering a woman's risk for breast cancer. In ancient cultures, cabbage was considered a medicine. More recently, the National Cancer Institute has found that consuming cruciferous vegetables, including cabbage, may prevent a variety of cancers. This chopped salad offers several twists to the typical summer coleslaw. For instance, chopped celery is a common ingredient, but fennel adds a sweet crunchiness while providing a vitamin A and a fair amount of calcium, phosphorous and potassium.
NEWS
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | January 11, 2006
With the hottest Buffalo wings, it's tough to balance spice and taste. The scent alone should tingle your nose at arm's length, but the sauce can't overpower the chicken's flavor. Here's a roundup of four local restaurants' most fiery wings. All the orders came with celery sticks and blue-cheese dressing, but a couple of restaurants added extra side vegetables. Kisling's Tavern 2100 Fleet St. -- 410-327-5477 Hours --11:30 a.m. to 2 a.m. daily Kisling's hot wings had a slow, rolling burn that set in after two or three drumsticks and took a handful of celery to cool down.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | February 18, 2004
Audrey R. Patton of Jeannette, Pa., is seeking a crab mold, which "has crab meat, Campbell's tomato soup, Knox gelatin and celery." Verna Kushel of Baltimore responded with a recipe that she says "my daughter, Barbara Janofsky, served at a party." Crab Mold Serves 8 to 10 as an appetizer 1 package unflavored Knox gelatin 8 ounces cream cheese 1 medium onion, finely chopped 1 1/2 cups finely chopped celery 4 ounces to 6 ounces crab meat, picked over 1 cup mayonnaise 1 can tomato soup Soak gelatin in 1/4 cup water, according to the package directions.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun reporter | January 24, 2007
Warmer-than-usual weather notwithstanding, January is the sick season - the time when flu cases usually peak. When illness creeps into your house, nothing soothes like homemade Chicken Noodle Soup. You might be tempted to just open a can, but homemade soup is so tasty and simple that Christopher Nasatka, a chef instructor at Baltimore International College, uses it as a way to have students practice their knife skills. A basic mirepoix - a mixture of chopped carrots, onions and celery - flavors chicken or turkey cooked as you like.
NEWS
By Betty Hallock and Betty Hallock,Los Angeles Times | January 7, 2007
Parsnip and celery root are layered with nutmeg-laced cream and two kinds of cheese for this luscious gratin created by Ari Rosenson, chef de cuisine of Cut in Los Angeles. This recipe calls for a 9-inch gratin dish or deep-dish pie plate. Betty Hallock writes for the Los Angeles Times, which provided the recipe analysis. CELERY ROOT AND PARSNIP GRATIN Serves 8 1 tablespoon butter 1 tablespoon finely chopped shallots 1 tablespoon finely chopped garlic 1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons heavy cream 1/4 cup plus 1 tablespoon milk 2 teaspoons salt 1/2 teaspoon finely ground black pepper 1 pinch nutmeg 2 large celery roots (about 2 1/2 pounds total)
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