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BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | July 15, 1998
Two Florida men accused of defrauding a British investment bank of more than $4 million as part of an alleged stock-rigging scheme involving a Maryland company have agreed to settle a lawsuit against them for $2.8 million, U.S. Bankruptcy Court records show.William P. Trainor and Vincent D. Celentano, two wealthy Hillsboro Beach, Fla., residents, and companies or family trusts connected to them have until July 31 to pay the $2.8 million. Otherwise, the case against them and others will continue, court records show.
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FEATURES
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun Reporter | December 23, 2006
Elene Celentano gets what she wants. When she wanted to rise to the top of her new career choice -- real estate -- she did it. When she wanted to sculpt her thin frame into a taut and enviable physique, she ran, biked and roller-bladed her way to it. So when it came time this month to look for the perfect dress to wear to her annual New Year's Eve party, Celentano knew it would only be a matter of time before she found it. Not even she could have...
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NEWS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | January 17, 2002
A key figure in the Novatek International Inc. stock-rigging scandal was ordered to pay $350,000 and was forever barred from running an American public company, the Securities and Exchange Commission announced yesterday. Vincent D. Celentano of Hillsboro, Fla., consented to the sanctions without admitting or denying the SEC's allegations of fraud and securities laws violations in one of the largest corporate scandals perpetrated in Maryland. Last week, in a related criminal case, Celentano was sentenced to two years of probation and fined $5,000.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | April 27, 2004
Dr. Alfred Sommer, who has steered the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health through an unprecedented period of growth, said yesterday that he would step down from his position as dean in September 2005. Announcing his decision in an e-mail to faculty and staff, Sommer said he plans to rejoin the faculty and devote more time to scholarly interests, ranging from nutrition to health policy. Sommer, who will have served 15 years as dean, said he originally expected to serve only five years, about average for a public health school head.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | September 23, 1998
A central figure in an alleged stock-rigging scheme involving Columbia-based Novatek International Inc. has invoked his Fifth Amendment rights against self-incrimination in answering a Securities and Exchange Commission complaint.A second key defendant argues that all the charges the SEC made against him should be dismissed for lack of evidence.In papers filed in U.S. District Court in Washington, Vincent D. Celentano, a wealthy Hillsboro Beach, Fla., real estate developer and businessman, argues that his Fifth Amendment refusal to respond to the allegations should be viewed by the court as a denial of all charges, not an admission of any wrongdoing.
FEATURES
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun Reporter | December 23, 2006
Elene Celentano gets what she wants. When she wanted to rise to the top of her new career choice -- real estate -- she did it. When she wanted to sculpt her thin frame into a taut and enviable physique, she ran, biked and roller-bladed her way to it. So when it came time this month to look for the perfect dress to wear to her annual New Year's Eve party, Celentano knew it would only be a matter of time before she found it. Not even she could have...
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | February 21, 1997
Three shareholders have filed a $55 million fraud lawsuit in U.S. District Court in Baltimore against the chairman and former officers and directors of Novatek International Inc., the Columbia-based company under federal investigation for stock fraud.Meanwhile, Joseph E. "Chick" Celentano, a Connecticut businessman, has filed a separate $3 million civil suit claiming he was defrauded by his cousin, Vincent D. Celentano, a Florida businessman who is one of Novatek's major shareholders.In a suit filed in U.S. District Court in Connecticut, Joseph Celentano charges his cousin induced him to invest in Novatek and a related venture in Russia, Health Care, Ltd., using false and misleading information.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | October 4, 1998
Almost two years after the Securities and Exchange Commission launched a probe into Columbia-based Novatek International Inc. and its misleading claims of multimillion contracts in Latin America, a clearer picture has emerged of an alleged scheme that stretched across three continents and involved a web of interrelated companies.At the heart of the action were two Howard County companies, Novatek and publicly traded Universal Healthwatch Inc. Buoyed by announcements of several multimillion dollar deals -- all fraudulent, according to the SEC -- Novatek's stock jumped to $13 in October 1996, before collapsing after the SEC halted trading.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | June 19, 1998
The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission yesterday accused the two men behind Novatek International Inc., a bankrupt Columbia company now known as Medical Diagnostic Products Inc., of committing "massive fraud against investors."In a 27-page complaint filed in U.S. District Court in Washington, the SEC said Novatek principals William P. Trainor and Vincent D. Celentano had orchestrated sham transactions to inflate the company's stock price."We're talking about a company that inflated its assets 25-fold and a company that inflated its sales to $400 million with contracts that did not exist," James A. Kidney, one of the SEC attorneys involved in the investigation, said in an interview yesterday.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | July 9, 1998
Two Maryland residents and another former officer of Novatek International Inc., the bankrupt Columbia company that has been under an 18-month federal investigation for fraud, have settled charges that they misled investors about the status of contracts the company claimed it had locked up in South America.Without admitting or denying the allegations, the three men named in the complaint have signed agreements that they won't violate SEC regulations.Todd Cranford, a lawyer in the enforcement division of the Securities and Exchange Commission, said no fines or other penalties were imposed.
NEWS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | January 17, 2002
A key figure in the Novatek International Inc. stock-rigging scandal was ordered to pay $350,000 and was forever barred from running an American public company, the Securities and Exchange Commission announced yesterday. Vincent D. Celentano of Hillsboro, Fla., consented to the sanctions without admitting or denying the SEC's allegations of fraud and securities laws violations in one of the largest corporate scandals perpetrated in Maryland. Last week, in a related criminal case, Celentano was sentenced to two years of probation and fined $5,000.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2000
A lawyer for British investment house Wood Gundy London Ltd. and other creditors in the Novatek International Inc. bankruptcy case said yesterday that the group plans to begin seizing assets of Florida businessman William P. Trainor and his family as a result of their failure to make a $300,000 settlement payment. "We plan to push forward to enforce these judgments, find assets and strip them of everything we can find," said Edward J. Meehan, of Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP in Washington, which is representing creditors who sued the Trainors.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1999
A federal judge in Baltimore yesterday gave creditors seeking the return of millions they claim were illegally siphoned out of a Columbia company the right to seize assets of a Florida businessmen and his family if they don't make timely payments under a settlement.Under the order signed by U.S. Bankruptcy Judge James T. Schneider, British investment house Wood Gundy London Ltd. and other creditors could seize assets, such as cars, homes and bank accounts, of William P. Trainor and family members.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | November 23, 1999
A Florida businessmen, accused of defrauding investors in a bankrupt Columbia medical test company, and members of his family have agreed to pay creditors the balance of a $2.8 million settlement of an $8 million lawsuit.The new settlement terms, filed Friday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, represent a second attempt to secure payment by targeting assets of family members and avert a trial that had been slated for this month, a lawyer for the creditors said.The original suit had sought the return of more than $8 million that William P. Trainor and a Florida business associate, Vincent Celentano, allegedly siphoned off from Novatek International Inc. of Columbia.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | April 28, 1999
A British investment bank is seeking court permission to begin seizing assets of William P. Trainor, one of the alleged masterminds behind bankrupt Columbia-based Novatek International Inc., as well as the assets of six of his family members.In papers filed yesterday in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Baltimore, London-based Wood Gundy London Ltd. is seeking a summary judgment in an $8 million lawsuit it has rekindled against the Trainor family. If granted, the order would allow Wood Gundy and other creditors to seize assets of the Trainors and companies connected to them without a trial.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | October 4, 1998
Almost two years after the Securities and Exchange Commission launched a probe into Columbia-based Novatek International Inc. and its misleading claims of multimillion contracts in Latin America, a clearer picture has emerged of an alleged scheme that stretched across three continents and involved a web of interrelated companies.At the heart of the action were two Howard County companies, Novatek and publicly traded Universal Healthwatch Inc. Buoyed by announcements of several multimillion dollar deals -- all fraudulent, according to the SEC -- Novatek's stock jumped to $13 in October 1996, before collapsing after the SEC halted trading.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | November 23, 1999
A Florida businessmen, accused of defrauding investors in a bankrupt Columbia medical test company, and members of his family have agreed to pay creditors the balance of a $2.8 million settlement of an $8 million lawsuit.The new settlement terms, filed Friday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, represent a second attempt to secure payment by targeting assets of family members and avert a trial that had been slated for this month, a lawyer for the creditors said.The original suit had sought the return of more than $8 million that William P. Trainor and a Florida business associate, Vincent Celentano, allegedly siphoned off from Novatek International Inc. of Columbia.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1999
A federal judge in Baltimore yesterday gave creditors seeking the return of millions they claim were illegally siphoned out of a Columbia company the right to seize assets of a Florida businessmen and his family if they don't make timely payments under a settlement.Under the order signed by U.S. Bankruptcy Judge James T. Schneider, British investment house Wood Gundy London Ltd. and other creditors could seize assets, such as cars, homes and bank accounts, of William P. Trainor and family members.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | September 23, 1998
A central figure in an alleged stock-rigging scheme involving Columbia-based Novatek International Inc. has invoked his Fifth Amendment rights against self-incrimination in answering a Securities and Exchange Commission complaint.A second key defendant argues that all the charges the SEC made against him should be dismissed for lack of evidence.In papers filed in U.S. District Court in Washington, Vincent D. Celentano, a wealthy Hillsboro Beach, Fla., real estate developer and businessman, argues that his Fifth Amendment refusal to respond to the allegations should be viewed by the court as a denial of all charges, not an admission of any wrongdoing.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | August 20, 1998
A Florida man accused by federal authorities of being one of the masterminds behind a stock-rigging scheme involving Columbia-based Novatek International Inc. has failed to pay more than $2 million due under the agreement to settle a fraud suit, according to a lawyer representing the plaintiffs.The lawyer, Edward Meehan, said the group he represents might seek to seize assets of William P. Trainor and his company, New England Diagnostics Inc., or to rekindle its $8 million suit against him and others.
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