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Celebrex

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By Delthia Ricks and Delthia Ricks,NEWSDAY | July 15, 2003
Arthritis remedy Celebrex can boost the effectiveness of chemotherapy for lung cancer, shrinking tumors and cutting off their blood supply, Manhattan scientists will report in a study published today. The small research project, which involved 29 patients with the most common form of the cancer, marks the first time the widely used arthritis medication has proved effective against active tumors. Previous studies suggested it can inhibit cancer development before it starts. In 1999, the Food and Drug Administration licensed Celebrex as a preventive for patients with a rare genetic condition in which pre-cancerous polyps develop into colorectal cancer.
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NEWS
By Michelle Fay Cortez and Michelle Fay Cortez,Bloomberg News Service | September 1, 2006
The painkiller Celebrex nearly halves the chance of developing colon polyps - but nearly doubles the risk of heart problems, say newly published studies that may rule out the drug's widespread use for preventing cancer. The studies, in yesterday's New England Journal of Medicine, suggest that scientists are on the right research track in how they attack the second-most-deadly cancer after lung tumors. At the same time, the size of the heart risks makes the results "bittersweet," a researcher said.
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NEWS
By Michelle Fay Cortez and Michelle Fay Cortez,Bloomberg News Service | September 1, 2006
The painkiller Celebrex nearly halves the chance of developing colon polyps - but nearly doubles the risk of heart problems, say newly published studies that may rule out the drug's widespread use for preventing cancer. The studies, in yesterday's New England Journal of Medicine, suggest that scientists are on the right research track in how they attack the second-most-deadly cancer after lung tumors. At the same time, the size of the heart risks makes the results "bittersweet," a researcher said.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2005
As patients have turned to other painkillers to avoid the cardiovascular risks associated with Vioxx, Bextra and Celebrex, scientists are casting suspicion on several of the substitutes, especially Mobic. Prescriptions for Mobic have tripled since September, when the maker of Vioxx voluntarily withdrew the Cox-2 inhibiting painkiller because of findings of heart problems. Immediately, the maker of Mobic began courting former Vioxx users, through ads and company representatives' visits to doctors.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | December 7, 2004
Since Vioxx was withdrawn from the market nine weeks ago, patients and doctors have worried that the popular drug Celebrex, a similar anti-inflammatory, might also increase the risk of heart attack. A study released yesterday eased these fears, but researchers said the jury is still out. In the online Annals of Internal Medicine, scientists reported that patients taking Vioxx were three times as likely to have heart attacks as those on Celebrex. "There was a difference in risk between Celebrex and Vioxx," said the study's lead author, Dr. Stephen Kimmel, a cardiologist and epidemiologist at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine.
NEWS
By Tyler Marshall and Tyler Marshall,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 20, 2004
WASHINGTON - The head of the pharmaceutical company that produces the arthritis painkiller Celebrex argued yesterday that the drug still had an important role in medical treatment despite a federal warning that its use could promote heart attacks. "We need to put the cardiovascular risk in perspective here," Pfizer Inc.'s chairman and chief executive officer, Hank McKinnell, said on ABC's This Week. "For millions of patients, Celebrex is the best option, or in some cases, the last option to live a normal life with the pain and inflammation of arthritis."
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | December 18, 2004
Pfizer Inc. warned yesterday that its popular painkiller, Celebrex, might raise the risk of heart attack. Many experts responded by recommending that patients stop using the drug. Critics said the announcement raises safety questions about all anti-inflammatory drugs in the same category and shows that the Food and Drug Administration is not ensuring the safety of the nation's drugs. "It's more indication that the FDA isn't doing its job," said Dr. Sidney Wolfe, head of the consumer activist group Public Citizen, which has warned of problems with Celebrex since 2001.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Ivan Penn and Laura Vozzella and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | December 23, 2004
Hours after the safety of a blockbuster arthritis drug was called into question last week, a new Web page popped up on injuryboard.com, inviting patients to summarize their "Celebrex experience" and then click a button to submit their "case" to a personal injury lawyer. Move over tobacco, asbestos and fen-phen. The next big wave of lawsuits to hit courthouses across America is likely to target the makers of Celebrex, Vioxx and Bextra - similar and enormously popular painkillers now suspected of increasing the risk of heart attacks and strokes.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and David Kohn and Jonathan Bor and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | December 22, 2004
Less than 24 hours after federal authorities announced that yet another painkiller was possibly linked to heart attacks, an arthritis sufferer e-mailed her Baltimore doctor yesterday a question that echoed across the country: "So what now?" The patient had shifted from Vioxx to Bextra to Celebrex and finally to naproxen - each time abandoning a drug that worked when news of possible cardiovascular risks emerged. Now, with the surprise announcement that naproxen had come under scrutiny, Dr. Marc C. Hochberg had no choice but to admit his limitations.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | December 21, 2004
In a surprise announcement that cast further confusion on the safety of common painkillers, federal officials said yesterday they have found preliminary signs that a popular medication, naproxen, could increase the risk of heart disease and stroke. The evidence is the first ever to implicate the 30-year-old drug in cardiovascular ailments. Naproxen is sold over the counter under the brand name Aleve, as well as under a variety of proprietary labels. In prescription strength, it is sold as Naprosyn, Anaprox and Naprelan.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN STAFF | February 25, 2005
Now that health concerns have been raised about newer anti-inflammatory drugs like Vioxx, Celebrex and Bextra, some Americans may be taking another look at one of the few medicines that have been around since the Victorian era. That would, of course, be aspirin. According to some estimates, a trillion tablets have been taken in its long history. Aspirin is effective, relatively safe and costs as little as a penny a tablet. So what's not to like? "We medically know it's as good an anti-inflammatory as any other," says Dr. Alan Kimmel, a Towson internist.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2005
GAITHERSBURG - An influential Food and Drug Administration advisory committee concluded yesterday that three controversial anti-inflammatory drugs increase heart attacks and strokes, but recommended that the medicines remain available because of their benefits. The decision pleased the drugs' makers but disappointed some researchers and public health advocates, who said that at least two of the three painkilling drugs, which are known as Cox-2 inhibitors, are too dangerous to be on the market.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 18, 2005
GAITHERSBURG - Food and Drug Administration whistle-blower David J. Graham told a panel of scientists yesterday that he believed high doses of the Cox-2 inhibitor drug Celebrex pose a risk of increased heart attack or stroke but the risk drops at lower doses. Graham, testifying on his findings on the safety of several painkillers widely used by arthritis patients, also raised the possibility of cardiovascular risk in taking Mobic, or meloxicam. The top-selling drug is from a more traditional class of anti-inflammatory medications.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon & Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon & Teresa Graedon,KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | January 16, 2005
I heard a report about the effectiveness of magnetic bracelets for arthritis pain. My 85-year-old father suffers terribly and has been taking Celebrex. We're concerned about reports linking Celebrex to heart attacks and strokes. Heart disease runs in our family, so I want to find the bracelets for him. Others in our family have similar concerns. I had my knees replaced in my mid-50s, and my son, in his 30s, is already miserable. I need to know more. What journal published the study? What are the specifics about the type of magnetic bracelet?
NEWS
December 26, 2004
IT'S TEMPTING to poke fun at warnings that the safety of drugs imported from other countries cannot be guaranteed by the Food and Drug Administration. Given the FDA's record at home of late, the impulse is to say: No loss there. But that would be a cheap shot that minimizes the very serious issues underlying the national debate over Americans' growing demand for medicines from Canada and elsewhere because they are cheaper than what is available in the United States. Prescription drugs cost way too much in this country because Americans alone are footing the bill for research as well as advertising and handsome industry profits.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and David Kohn and Jonathan Bor and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | December 24, 2004
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommended limited use of the painkilling drugs Celebrex and Bextra yesterday, urging patients who are at high risk for heart attacks and strokes to avoid the drugs if possible. In its public health advisory, which followed a spate of conflicting studies about the potential risks of pain relievers, the agency did not rule out use of COX-2 inhibitors, the class to which the two drugs belong. Patients who are prone to gastric bleeding, a well-known side effect of such older anti-inflammatory drugs as aspirin, naproxen and ibuprofen, might be candidates for the COX-2 drugs, the FDA said.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and David Kohn and Jonathan Bor and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | December 24, 2004
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommended limited use of the painkilling drugs Celebrex and Bextra yesterday, urging patients who are at high risk for heart attacks and strokes to avoid the drugs if possible. In its public health advisory, which followed a spate of conflicting studies about the potential risks of pain relievers, the agency did not rule out use of COX-2 inhibitors, the class to which the two drugs belong. Patients who are prone to gastric bleeding, a well-known side effect of such older anti-inflammatory drugs as aspirin, naproxen and ibuprofen, might be candidates for the COX-2 drugs, the FDA said.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 18, 2005
GAITHERSBURG - Food and Drug Administration whistle-blower David J. Graham told a panel of scientists yesterday that he believed high doses of the Cox-2 inhibitor drug Celebrex pose a risk of increased heart attack or stroke but the risk drops at lower doses. Graham, testifying on his findings on the safety of several painkillers widely used by arthritis patients, also raised the possibility of cardiovascular risk in taking Mobic, or meloxicam. The top-selling drug is from a more traditional class of anti-inflammatory medications.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Ivan Penn and Laura Vozzella and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | December 23, 2004
Hours after the safety of a blockbuster arthritis drug was called into question last week, a new Web page popped up on injuryboard.com, inviting patients to summarize their "Celebrex experience" and then click a button to submit their "case" to a personal injury lawyer. Move over tobacco, asbestos and fen-phen. The next big wave of lawsuits to hit courthouses across America is likely to target the makers of Celebrex, Vioxx and Bextra - similar and enormously popular painkillers now suspected of increasing the risk of heart attacks and strokes.
NEWS
December 22, 2004
FIRST IT was Vioxx, then Celebrex, now Aleve. What a pain - literally. Battered athletes and arthritic boomers fear they are running out of options for maintaining their quality of life. When pain relievers heavily promoted for years are suddenly found to be dangerous, there's bound to be alarm. But the latest news from the pharmaceutical front must be kept in perspective. All drugs pose some risks, which vary widely among patients. Their use should always be weighed on a case-by-case basis.
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