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By Robert Nusgart and Robert Nusgart,SUN REAL ESTATE EDITOR | April 8, 2001
The saying goes that a man's house is his castle. Well, the trend that is beginning to evolve is that a home should be built to the size of a castle. Bigger rooms. More space. Higher ceilings. Larger homes. All on smaller lots. That was one of the findings of a forecast describing "The Next Decade for Housing" released last month by the National Association of Home Builders. It is a trend not lost on local homebuilders in the Baltimore area. In addition to the ever-expanding home, the forecast, put together by NAHB's economics, mortgage and finance and policy divisions, also gave a number of predictions concerning American housing for the next decade.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | February 17, 2014
Is it possible that the adults in Congress are finally taking over? That prospect has reared its head in the decision of Republican leaders in both the House and Senate to back away from another threatened government shutdown by swallowing an uncomplicated vote to raise the federal debt ceiling. First, House Speaker John Boehner looked down the black hole of government shutdown, a potential replay of the tea-party engineered kamikaze mission in October, and refused to lead his party into it again.
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By Rose Bennett Gilbert and Rose Bennett Gilbert,Copley News Service | December 30, 1990
Q: I want to turn the top floor of an old Victorian into a separate apartment, but I'm confused by the ceilings, which slant down beside the dormer windows. Should I just paint them the same color as the walls and hope they disappear?A: You have the right idea if you want to make light of your eccentric ceilings. One color, used overall, will camouflage architectural oddments and practically eliminate the negative.However, you could take the other lyric from the song and accentuate the positive: Play up the architectural characteristics that will give your apartment added personality.
NEWS
February 6, 2014
The nation's debt ceiling is back in the news this week and for all the old, familiar reasons. By month's end, it will need to be raised or the U.S. Treasury will run out of money to pay the country's outstanding bills, and House Republicans are once again looking to hold the authorizing legislation hostage in return for some sort of concession. What will it be this time? For a while, it looked like they would insist on some changes to Obamacare, specifically, the so-called "risk corridors," a provision of the Affordable Care Act that limits how much insurance companies can profit or lose by selling health insurance policies through exchanges during the first three years.
BUSINESS
By Samantha Kappalman | November 9, 1997
IN WHAT IS being called one of the most important business decisions of its 1997-1998 term, the Supreme Court last week unanimously ruled that manufacturers and wholesalers in some instances may set ceilings on retail prices.The decision overturned its 1968 ruling that such price ceilings were illegal under the federal antitrust law.Whether such a ceiling is legal should be analyzed under the commonly used "rule of reason" governing antitrust cases, the court said.The ruling represented a major victory for the Justice Department, which had argued that maximum-price restrictions are likely to be pro-competitive and should be considered on a case-by-case basis.
BUSINESS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun reporter | December 2, 2007
Traditional and understated outside, this Roland Park home is distinguished by its unexpected interior. The ceilings soar to show a grand foyer with a slate floor and a wood plank ceiling. Sunlight permeates the home's three levels with large skylights, picture windows, interior windows and French doors. All take advantage of the dappled shade of tall trees and terraced patios. An unusual spark is a loft library, a cozy nook that's in contrast to the expansive beamed living room. The owners, Laura Burrows and A. Michael Jackson, are selling because "it's time to move on," Burrows said, noting that she wants to downsize.
NEWS
By RITA ST. CLAIR | October 16, 1991
More and more Americans are living the high life.Until recently, ample vertical space was found almost exclusively in old town houses and in lofts that had been converted for residential use. The vast majority of dwellings built since the 1950s were outfitted with 8-foot ceilings. Initially seen as fashionable, the low ceilings soon became a standard feature, especially in apartments. It didn't take builders long to realize that they could squeeze more units into a given structure by limiting ceiling heights.
BUSINESS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 19, 2003
Custom builder Steve Hill said that when it comes to today's cathedral ceilings, most of his customers just can't resist the "wow" factor. They love it when guests arrive at their front door and are impressed by the two-story ceilings and grandiose windows. But Hill, whose Artery Homes builds houses throughout the Baltimore, Washington and Eastern Shore areas, said those dramatic elements can cause the homeowner problems with increased building costs, higher energy bills and wasted space.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 13, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Congress is beginning to get a close look at the price of keeping the federal budget in balance -- it would mean squeezing everybody's favorite programs -- and signs are that the lawmakers won't pay it.As for the much-heralded budget surplus: Forget about it.Would-be budget-cutters are unnerved by dire scenarios: Scientific research canceled. Homeless AIDS patients left on the streets. Poor children turned away from Head Start programs. Emergency heating aid to the elderly denied.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 28, 1998
WASHINGTON -- In a case that President Clinton and campaign finance reform advocates hope will lead the Supreme Court to change its mind about spending ceilings, a federal appeals court struck down yesterday a Cincinnati mandatory ceilings law passed explicitly to put the justices to a test.A three-judge panel of the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, rebuffing the pleas of 24 states and a host of activist organizations who want to curb spending, said that the arguments in favor of caps on campaign outlays have been rejected by the Supreme Court for more than 20 years.
NEWS
October 14, 2013
With the government shutdown entering its third week and Thursday's deadline to raise the debt ceiling - and hold off potential default - now looming, negotiations appear to have entered a new phase of victim-hood. Apparently, it's not enough for the hostage-taking that started this mess to fail, Republicans fret that Democrats are now pressing their political advantage. At least that's the impression from some in the GOP who went to the airwaves in recent days to warn Democrats not to "get greedy" or "humiliate" their party.
NEWS
October 14, 2013
Kudos to President Barack Obama for rejecting the Republican proposal for a short term increase in the debt limit (" Obama and Republicans struggle to break fiscal impasse," Oct. 11). There can be no negotiations until the debt ceiling is raised and a budget is passed. The Congress has a Constitutional duty to raise the debt ceiling and fund the government, and these duties under the Constitution are absolute and not subject to conditions or negotiations. Blackmail and hostage taking constitute criminal offenses and have no role in the running of government.
NEWS
October 10, 2013
Republican Sens. Ted Cruz and Rand Paul for too long have lead the GOP into believing their claim that the debt ceiling and government shutdown issues won't cause an economic calamity ( "Ted Cruz wins by losing," Sept. 27). All well and good senators, but here is a dose of reality: Japan and China, among other purchasers of U.S. Treasury bonds, recently said the impasse in Washington is very disturbing. Get your house in order, they say. Yet the initial reaction to that by many here, particularly among this tea party set, is "the hell with those foreigners.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2013
Until recently, the markets largely ignored the political jockeying over whether to raise the federal debt ceiling, figuring there's no way Congress would purposely default on the nation's obligations and potentially throw the U.S. economy into another recession. But as the Oct. 17th deadline approaches with no resolution in sight, markets are getting nervous. Rates on Treasury bills have been rising. The Dow Jones industrial average gave up 296 points, or nearly 2 percent, early this week, but rose slightly Wednesday with the nomination of Janet Yellen to lead the Federal Reserve.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2013
President Barack Obama used a speech Thursday in Maryland to sharpen his critique of Republican leaders, who responded by pointing a finger at Democrats in a budget showdown that left the government closed for a third day. Speaking at a Rockville construction firm, Obama said House Speaker John A. Boehner could easily end the impasse that caused the shutdown by voting on a stop-gap spending bill free of provisions to delay the Affordable Care Act,...
NEWS
By John Fritze and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2013
President Barack Obama will make his case for reopening the federal government at a construction firm in Maryland on Thursday as a political solution to end the 2-day-old shutdown remains elusive. Obama will visit the Rockville office of Baltimore-based M. Luis Construction - one of the state's largest minority- and woman-owned companies - in an effort to cast the impasse as harmful to business and put public pressure on Republicans to strike a deal. "It's very appropriate, in fact, necessary for the president to be talking to the country about what's at stake here," said Democratic Rep. Chris Van Hollen, who represents Rockville.
BUSINESS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun reporter | August 10, 2008
When Jeanne and Sean St. Martin bought an old house on a hill above Historic Ellicott City's Main Street, they became the owners of a building that had been turned into three apartments and had been rented for decades. They could see the sky through numerous places in the roof. That was 22 years and many improvements ago. The couple, both accountants, removed walls, created rooms, dumped three work kitchens in favor of one airy eat-in and stripped the black paint off the pine floors in a home that already had a few additions to the original house.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | February 22, 2003
Maryland agricultural and environmental officials, along with executives from one of the nation's largest egg producers, are working to salvage three huge chicken sheds in Cecil County where heavy snow caused ceilings to collapse Monday, trapping 300,000 egg-laying hens in their cages. Many hens were crushed, company officials said, when ceiling trusses collapsed. Others might have died when automated feeding and watering systems failed at the egg farm near Cecilton. Heating systems in the buildings apparently are operating, roofs are intact and the birds have not been exposed to the elements, said Greg Clanton, vice-president of ISE America, a Japanese company that owns the buildings and has its Maryland headquarters in Galena.
NEWS
September 26, 2013
Ever see the Al Pacino movie, "Dog Day Afternoon?" Based on a true story, it's about a bank robbery that goes bad. When it becomes clear that the jig is up - that there's not much money to be had and they're surrounded by police - the list of demands gets truly outrageous, including a limousine to the airport and a jet to fly them out of the country. That appears to be exactly what's happening in the U.S. House of Representatives. Now that it's clear that they're getting nowhere by threatening a government shutdown on Oct. 1 unless Obamacare is defunded, Republicans are looking to shoot the proverbial moon.
NEWS
July 25, 2013
For those who missed it, President Barack Obama turned his attention to the U.S. economy this week in speeches where he renewed his commitment to green energy, boosting manufacturing, and spending more on infrastructure like roads and bridges; chastised Republicans for political gridlock; and reached out to the still-hurting middle class. While these were familiar White House themes and many are quite popular with voters, the "major" policy announcements drew a ho-hum response that may have resonated no farther from Galesburg, Ill. (the site of one speech)
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