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By Gene Austin and Gene Austin,Knight-Ridder News Service | April 11, 1992
Installing ceiling tiles is a fairly simple way to renew a badly deteriorated ceiling, or to give any ceiling an attractive finish during remodeling.Since some tiles also have acoustical or sound-deadening properties, the ceiling can have extra value. If installed on the ceiling of a family room under a bedroom, for example, the tiles can help absorb family-room noise that otherwise would reach the bedroom.When installing tiles for sound-deadening purposes, keep in mind that they are most effective for containing sound in the room where they are installed.
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By DeeDee Correll and DeeDee Correll,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 14, 2008
DENVER -- Scott Anthony Gomez Jr. made his first break from the Pueblo County Jail two years ago. He pushed up a ceiling tile, hoisted himself up into the ventilation system and climbed until he reached a roof. Then he shimmied down the wall on bedsheets fashioned into a makeshift rope. Caught two days later, he ended up back in his cell. The next time, Gomez again pried loose a ceiling tile and vanished into the guts of the building. But as he tried to rappel on bedsheets down the side of the 85-foot building, he fell.
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By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | October 8, 1992
Nancy S. Copeland entered the building construction industry on the ground floor, but now has her sights set on the ceiling.Tile, that is, especially those that are stained, warped or otherwise in need of repair or cleaning.After three years of research and development, Columbia-based Ceiling Seal is trying to establish a niche in the building management market as a company that can help building owners save money and do a good deed for the environment, said Ms. Copeland, the owner and founder.
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By KATRINA ALTERSITZ and KATRINA ALTERSITZ,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | October 2, 2005
GAITHERSBURG - Jack Pykosh, 8, has endured multiple antibiotics, CAT scans and the removal of his adenoids in an attempt to alleviate his chronic sinusitis and allergies to pollen and mold. Jack's father, Paul Pykosh, has resorted to ultraviolet lights lights to kill bacteria, cleaning vents, dehumidifiers and expensive filters in his house. This summer, it all seemed to be working. But when Jack returned to DuFief Elementary School in Gaithersburg this fall, his congestion worsened. Pykosh thinks it has something to do with the mold problem at his son's school.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | August 16, 1998
County school officials have barred any use of the auditorium at North County High School because several 15-pound ceiling tiles fell to the floor recently, and other tiles are starting to come loose. No one was in the auditorium when the first tiles fell during the last week in July, said Principal Patricia Gronkiewicz.Officials are reviewing contractors who could remove all the tiles so the auditorium can be reopened as soon as possible, said Ed Almes, school system maintenance supervisor.
NEWS
By Connsella A. Lee and Connsella A. Lee,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1995
Melting snow on the Park Elementary School roof caused minor damage yesterday when water leaked through and caused some ceiling tiles to collapse, said Principal Diane L. Lenzi.The snow, left from the Saturday night storm, soaked the lobby ceiling tiles, which fell about 7:30 a.m.Staff members used garbage cans to catch the water, and mopped puddles. By 8:20 a.m., everything was clean, Mrs. Lenzi said.The roof, which has caused problems before, is expected to require only minor repairs to keep it intact until the students and staff can move into the new Park Elementary School next year, she said.
NEWS
By Meredith Schlow and Meredith Schlow,Staff Writer | March 12, 1992
Missing ceiling tiles that exposed dangerous asbestos were not replaced for months at Sussex Elementary because school officials had faulty information about the location of asbestos in the building.A review of a 1988 report concerning Sussex, on which the school relied to pinpoint asbestos dangers, showed that the inspection failed to identify a beam sprayed with asbestos.A Kansas contractor, Hall-Kimbrell Environmental Services, was paid approximately $1 million by Baltimore County to assess asbestos contamination in all 147 public schools, officials said.
NEWS
By Meredith Schlow and Meredith Schlow,Staff Writer | March 12, 1992
Missing ceiling tiles exposing dangerous asbestos were not replaced for months at Sussex Elementary because school officials had faulty information about the location of asbestos in the building.A review of a 1988 report concerning Sussex, on which the school relied to pinpoint asbestos dangers, showed that the inspection failed to identify a beam sprayed with asbestos that two months ago forced officials to close the building.The Kansas-based contractor that did the inspection, Hall-Kimbrell Environmental Services, was paid approximately $1 million by Baltimore County to assess asbestos contamination in all 147 county public schools, officials said.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN STAFF | January 25, 1997
Children at Bear Creek Elementary School, which was closed Jan. 17 after tests showed elevated levels of airborne asbestos, will be sent to six nearby schools for several weeks while workers replace ceiling tiles in the building, Baltimore County school officials said yesterday.The latest air tests, released yesterday, reveal levels of asbestos within requirements set by the Environmental Protection Agency. But a team of school officials, teachers and parents decided to keep the building closed after tests on ceiling tiles in one wing determined that some contained asbestos, schools spokesman Donald I. Mohler said.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Sun Staff Writer | April 6, 1995
Bud Thomas has seen a lot of acoustic ceiling tiles in his long career in school building maintenance, but never such masterpieces as Leonor Pisano's at Lisbon Elementary School in western Howard County. Ms. Pisano's ceiling paintings would make Michelangelo proud.In fact, the 43-year-old art teacher does something of which the Italian Renaissance artist and architect only could have dreamed as he lay on his back four years painting the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel in the Vatican: She puts the ceiling on a table to paint it.Mr.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2005
When Margaret D. Rappaport, clerk of the Howard County Circuit Court, travels out of town, she usually scopes out the local courthouse wedding rooms looking for inspiration on how to spruce up the one in her office. During a recent trip to Las Vegas, she went further and visited wedding rooms in splashy luxury hotels -- the Bellagio, Caesars Palace and the Venetian. She saw glass sconces at the Venetian and knew those had to be part of the new wedding space that is being built in the Ellicott City courthouse.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | September 2, 2004
A scientist's report has confirmed what a mold-detecting dog sniffed out two weeks ago: There are mold growths on the carpeting, ceiling tiles and books in the Howard County circuit clerk's office. A laboratory analysis of five samples collected by the dog's handlers, David and Rondra Marcelli of Westminster, found various types of fungi on four, most prominently on a piece of ceiling tile, according to a report from Oregon-based Mould- Works. The mold found in the tile, Chaetomium globosum, can produce toxins and was the "most prevalent" fungus found in the samples, according to the report.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2000
Vents and ceiling tiles at White Oak Elementary School in Baltimore County are being cleaned or replaced and outside walls resealed after complaints from teachers that the school's heating and cooling system may have caused some of them to become ill. Teachers met with school system officials yesterday to get a progress report and were told that the school's heating and air-conditioning system could be replaced by spring 2002, or sooner if needed....
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | August 16, 1998
County school officials have barred any use of the auditorium at North County High School because several 15-pound ceiling tiles fell to the floor recently, and other tiles are starting to come loose. No one was in the auditorium when the first tiles fell during the last week in July, said Principal Patricia Gronkiewicz.Officials are reviewing contractors who could remove all the tiles so the auditorium can be reopened as soon as possible, said Ed Almes, school system maintenance supervisor.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN STAFF | January 25, 1997
Children at Bear Creek Elementary School, which was closed Jan. 17 after tests showed elevated levels of airborne asbestos, will be sent to six nearby schools for several weeks while workers replace ceiling tiles in the building, Baltimore County school officials said yesterday.The latest air tests, released yesterday, reveal levels of asbestos within requirements set by the Environmental Protection Agency. But a team of school officials, teachers and parents decided to keep the building closed after tests on ceiling tiles in one wing determined that some contained asbestos, schools spokesman Donald I. Mohler said.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1996
Health and indoor air quality experts told about 160 parents at Fullerton Elementary School last night that the building is safe to reopen for classes tomorrow but should be retested and monitored to make sure the mold that was blamed for health problems does not return.Although tests revealed abnormally high levels of mold in one classroom, the health risk is low because it is unlikely to be mobilized in large concentrations into the air, said Dr. Clifford Mitchell, an occupational and environmental physician at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1996
Health and indoor air quality experts told about 160 parents at Fullerton Elementary School last night that the building is safe to reopen for classes tomorrow but should be retested and monitored to make sure the mold that was blamed for health problems does not return.Although tests revealed abnormally high levels of mold in one classroom, the health risk is low because it is unlikely to be mobilized in large concentrations into the air, said Dr. Clifford Mitchell, an occupational and environmental physician at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health.
NEWS
By KATRINA ALTERSITZ and KATRINA ALTERSITZ,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | October 2, 2005
GAITHERSBURG - Jack Pykosh, 8, has endured multiple antibiotics, CAT scans and the removal of his adenoids in an attempt to alleviate his chronic sinusitis and allergies to pollen and mold. Jack's father, Paul Pykosh, has resorted to ultraviolet lights lights to kill bacteria, cleaning vents, dehumidifiers and expensive filters in his house. This summer, it all seemed to be working. But when Jack returned to DuFief Elementary School in Gaithersburg this fall, his congestion worsened. Pykosh thinks it has something to do with the mold problem at his son's school.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN STAFF | October 25, 1996
Baltimore County school officials closed Fullerton Elementary School for six days yesterday amid concerns by parents and teachers about air quality, recurring mold and illnesses that have dogged the school since the start of the school year.Tests conducted on the mold -- found on floor tiles and in the air -- show nothing to be alarmed about, school officials said.But in response to persistent complaints this week -- including some triggered by irritations from the bleach solution used to clean floors -- officials decided to close the building to permit uninterrupted work on replacing the floor tiles, which will cost roughly $30,000 .The decision came after a meeting of school and PTA officials and County Councilman Joseph Bartenfelder, whose daughter, a Fullerton third-grader, had bronchitis and pneumonia recently.
NEWS
By Connsella A. Lee and Connsella A. Lee,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1995
Melting snow on the Park Elementary School roof caused minor damage yesterday when water leaked through and caused some ceiling tiles to collapse, said Principal Diane L. Lenzi.The snow, left from the Saturday night storm, soaked the lobby ceiling tiles, which fell about 7:30 a.m.Staff members used garbage cans to catch the water, and mopped puddles. By 8:20 a.m., everything was clean, Mrs. Lenzi said.The roof, which has caused problems before, is expected to require only minor repairs to keep it intact until the students and staff can move into the new Park Elementary School next year, she said.
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