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By MICHAEL DAVIS | February 2, 1992
"What are you going to do with that collection of Playbills?" we ask Lou Cedrone, who's busily stacking and arranging them, just so. "They're going to the Enoch Pratt Free Library," he says with pride, satisfied that his years of carefully filing and protecting these programs wasn't for naught.This was just a few days before he wrote his final column as film and theater critic for The Evening Sun, a tenure that began at a quarter to Jayne Mansfield and ends at half past Madonna. After 40 years at the newspaper, 28 of them as its critic, Lou Cedrone bids adieu to Calvert and Centre streets, the crossroads where he wrote thousands of movie, stage and television reviews for Baltimore's afternoon newspaper.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2010
Henry Michael Cedrone, a retired machinist and musician who had an "uncanny ability" to keep people on the dance floor, died of respiratory failure Sept. 18 at St. Joseph Medical Center. He was 89 and lived in Lutherville. Born in Baltimore, he was raised on Granby Street in what was an Italian-Jewish immigrant near the Shot Tower and Little Italy. As a child, he listened to his father playing the accordion with other neighbors who played guitar and piano. He had an ear for music and picked up the instruments on his own. He was also a good singer.
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FEATURES
March 28, 1991
Well, the winners of the 63rd annual Academy Awards are now in the history books, and Evening Sun movie critic Lou Cedrone correctly picked five out of the 10 major categories. How did you do? The ballots for the You vs. Lou IV Oscar challenge are being counted. The winners will be announced soon.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | June 25, 1996
WILLIAMSPORT, Pa. -- A federal judge has approved class-action status for a lawsuit that accuses a developer and PNC Bank Corp. of defrauding people who bought lots in a planned resort near Hazelton, Pa.Buyers paid developer Frank Cedrone up to $100,000 for each of the undeveloped lots that were to front a golf course and an artificial lake at the Valley of Lakes development, the suit says.The lots now are worth less than $10,000 each, because the golf course and lake were never built, and the promised road and sewer improvements were never made, said Roger Antao, an attorney for the plaintiffs.
FEATURES
March 12, 1991
The Academy Awards will be announced March 25, but movie critic Lou Cedrone wants to know who your favorites are. This week we are asking you to call SUNDIAL to tell him your choices for best director, best picture, best actor and best actress. The results will be published next week in Accent.Today, tell Lou your choice for best director: Kevin Costner, "Dances With Wolves"; Francis Ford Coppola, "The Godfather, Part III"; Martin Scorsese, "GoodFellas"; Stephen Frears, "The Grifters"; Barbet Schroeder, "Reversal of Fortune."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | June 25, 1996
WILLIAMSPORT, Pa. -- A federal judge has approved class-action status for a lawsuit that accuses a developer and PNC Bank Corp. of defrauding people who bought lots in a planned resort near Hazelton, Pa.Buyers paid developer Frank Cedrone up to $100,000 for each of the undeveloped lots that were to front a golf course and an artificial lake at the Valley of Lakes development, the suit says.The lots now are worth less than $10,000 each, because the golf course and lake were never built, and the promised road and sewer improvements were never made, said Roger Antao, an attorney for the plaintiffs.
NEWS
By GILBERT SANDLER | January 28, 1992
LOU CEDRONE, who was drama critic of this newspaper for 40 years, has retired. And if you are of "retirement age," the shows -- theater productions and movies -- he has attended and reviewed span your lifetime in Baltimore. His memories remind you of where you were and what was happening in your life when . . .* The Mechanic opened in 1967 with Betty Grable starring in "Hello Dolly." "I loved Betty Grable," says Mr. Cedrone. "She was my World War II pin-up -- beautiful legs. But her voice was not really good enough for the part.
NEWS
January 9, 1991
More on the 'danger' of too many lawyersIt is with both amusement and satisfaction that I have followed the debate on your pages regarding the societal value of lawyers. Those two reactions were particularly aroused by J.W. Walton's Jan.2 letter in the Forum.My amusement was piqued by the arguments advanced by Walton. What evidence is there of a relationship between the number of lawyers and a system with "too many" laws? The American concept of liberty has always embraced the sanctity of individual rights.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik THEATER Not by the numbers | November 30, 1991
TELEVISION'Hallmark' dramaIt's hard to miss with a "Hallmark Hall of Fame" presentation that includes the likes of Denholm Elliott, Judy Davis and Sam Neill. "One Against the Wind," airing tomorrow night at 9 on Channel 11, features Davis as a wealthy Englishwoman living quite well in 1940 Paris, despite the Nazi occupation. But her life changes once she helps nurse a downed British pilot (Neill) back to health.A scintillating version of the award-winning musical "Nine" is currently on stage at the Vagabond Theatre.
NEWS
April 9, 1994
Joseph D. CedroneActor, contractorJoseph D. Cedrone, an actor, contractor and former steel worker, died April 2 of a stroke at his Anneslie residence. He was 82.He was a member of the Joventus Players, who performed at Ford's Theater, and the Vagabonds. In the latter group, he acted with Garry Moore, who became a radio and television personality, and Charles Marquis, who produced the "Gunsmoke" television series.In 1938, he co-founded the Hilltop Summer Theater in Ellicott City.After working briefly in New York's Cherry Lane Theater, he was inducted into the Army during World War II. He graduated from Officers Training School as a second lieutenant.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL DAVIS | February 2, 1992
"What are you going to do with that collection of Playbills?" we ask Lou Cedrone, who's busily stacking and arranging them, just so. "They're going to the Enoch Pratt Free Library," he says with pride, satisfied that his years of carefully filing and protecting these programs wasn't for naught.This was just a few days before he wrote his final column as film and theater critic for The Evening Sun, a tenure that began at a quarter to Jayne Mansfield and ends at half past Madonna. After 40 years at the newspaper, 28 of them as its critic, Lou Cedrone bids adieu to Calvert and Centre streets, the crossroads where he wrote thousands of movie, stage and television reviews for Baltimore's afternoon newspaper.
NEWS
By GILBERT SANDLER | January 28, 1992
LOU CEDRONE, who was drama critic of this newspaper for 40 years, has retired. And if you are of "retirement age," the shows -- theater productions and movies -- he has attended and reviewed span your lifetime in Baltimore. His memories remind you of where you were and what was happening in your life when . . .* The Mechanic opened in 1967 with Betty Grable starring in "Hello Dolly." "I loved Betty Grable," says Mr. Cedrone. "She was my World War II pin-up -- beautiful legs. But her voice was not really good enough for the part.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | January 17, 1992
IT'S BEEN a great 40 years. If I had to do it all over again, I'd do it exactly as I have.Being movie and stage critic for The Evening Sun for 28 of those years (for more than 14 of those same years, I also did television criticism) has been a career dream come true.No regrets. No sad songs. I was a star worshiper and remain one. It has been my privilege to interview some of the biggies during all those years, among them Joan Crawford, Katharine Hepburn, Ginger Rogers, Meryl Streep, William Holden, Sylvester Stallone, Gregory Peck, Robert Taylor, Marlon Brando, Elizabeth Taylor, Sophia Loren, Gina Lollobrigida, Paul Newman and James Mason (who said my face should be on a stamp, whatever that means)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik THEATER Saddle up | January 11, 1992
TELEVISIONFervent 'Last Wish'"Last Wish" is first class made-for-TV moviemaking. The film, which is based on NBC News Correspondent Betty Rollin's book of the same title, offers two of television's finest actresses at the top of their games. Patty Duke plays Rollin and Maureen Stapleton plays her mother, Ida, in this docudrama about Ida Rollin's wish to die after being diagnosed with a terminal illness. The film starts out as an issue movie about the right to die, but ends up a love story about a mother wanting to end her suffering and a daughter's efforts to help her do that.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik THEATER A corny classic | January 4, 1992
TELEVISIONVan Dyke returnsDick Van Dyke returns tomorrow night at 9 on WBAL-TV ( Channel 11) as Mark Sloan, the crime-solving doctor in "Diagnosis for Murder." Van Dyke first appeared as Dr. Sloan in a guest shot last year on "Jake and the Fatman." The response was good enough to warrant a made-for-TV movie as a pilot for possible weekly series. The cast of "Diagnosis for Murder" includes Bill Bixby, Mariette Hartley, Ken Kercheval and Van Dyke's son, Barry. The Towsontowne Dinner Theatre is staging a spirited production of David Merrick's tap-dancing musical hit, "42nd Street."
FEATURES
By Winifred Walsh | December 28, 1991
THEATERA lavish 'Carol'A lavish production of Charles Dickens' perennial favorite, "A Christmas Carol," is being staged by Thunderbird Limited Inc. in the spacious Central Center auditorium in downtown Chambersburg, Pa. The elaborate show is under the direction of Baltimorean Carl Schurr, producing artistic director of the Totem Pole Playhouse. The play stars Baltimore actor Wil Love as the miser Scrooge. Performances are at 2:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. at 285 E. Queen St., Chambersburg, Pa. Tickets: matinee $10/$11; evening $13/$14.
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