Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCedras
IN THE NEWS

Cedras

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 11, 1994
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- With as much dignity as a taunted, deposed dictator can muster, Lt. Gen. Raoul Cedras yesterday ceded military power here and prepared for exile, leaving the leadership of this benighted country to democratically elected President Jean-Bertrand Aristide.In Washington, President Clinton announced that Father Aristide will return to Haiti Saturday to resume his "rightful place" as the country's first democratically elected president.Mr. Clinton, who spoke to the nation about Iraq and Haiti, credited U.S. troops for putting Haiti back on the road to democracy.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 16, 1994
You are Mohamed Farah Aidid, or Kim Il Sung, or Raoul Cedras, or Radovan Karadzic. All the world regards you as a tyrant, a bloody-minded aggressor, an international pariah. Standing governments shun you, denounce you, refuse to grant you legitimacy. You are isolated, hemmed in, threatened with catastrophe. So what do you do? You pick up the phone and call Jimmy Carter.Three times since President Clinton took office he has stumbled into crises only to be rescued by the rather humiliating intervention of his fellow Southerner.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 10, 1994
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- Haitian dictator Lt. Gen. Raoul RTC Cedras will step down today, ending three years of military rule and terror here and clearing the way for the return of democratically elected President Jean-Bertrand Aristide later this week.In a plan approved Saturday by Washington, General Cedras will be replaced by the army's No. 2 man, Maj. Gen. Jean-Claude Duperval, said Col. Jean-Robert Gabriel, a spokesman for the Haitian high command.Also set to leave is Brig. Gen. Philippe Biamby, the army chief of staff and a leader of the September 1991 coup that ousted Father Aristide.
NEWS
By Andrew Downie and Andrew Downie,Special to The Sun | December 16, 1994
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- As right-hand man to the country's former dictator, Romeo Halloun had it all.In a country where peasants pray for a seat on the bus or for a few eggs from their chickens, he had money, guns and influence.Mr. Halloun moved about the island as if it were his personal fief.During the heyday of Lt. Col. Raul Cedras, United Nations officials here say, Mr. Halloun commanded groups of heavily armed thugs and participated in the illegal import of every kind of product.He had studied in the United States, held U.S. citizenship and spoke several languages well.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 25, 1994
PANAMA CITY, Panama -- For three years, he ruled Haiti with an iron fist. But now, officials say, Lt. Gen. Raoul Cedras sits in a rundown hotel room writing his memoirs and worrying if his children will be harassed at school.Since arriving in Panama on Oct. 13, he has remained secluded in the Riande Continental Hotel near the airport. People who have visited General Cedras said he had spent most of the day working on the memoirs on a computer.The general and his wife, Yannick, and their three children are sharing a small two-bedroom suite in a hotel that a diplomat rated as "1 1/2 stars, with musty carpets and tacky furnishings from the 1970s."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 15, 1994
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- In a sign of a growing rift between Haiti's top military leaders, the brother of the country's police chief hinted yesterday that the chief was willing to step down and called on the army leader to resign as well to prevent an invasion by the United States.In a radio interview, Evans Francois, a Haitian diplomat who is the brother of the widely feared police chief, Col. Joseph Michel Francois, said that his brother was "willing to make the necessary concessions."Mr.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 14, 1994
WASHINGTON -- After three years of diplomacy and three weeks of U.S. military occupation, the end of Haiti's dictatorship came down to a real-estate deal.The just-retired Haitian strongman, Lt. Gen. Raoul Cedras, and his wife, Yannick, demanded compensation for the property they were leaving behind in Haiti.The United States obliged. After first refusing to buy the property, U.S. officials agreed to rent General Cedras' hillside mansion outside Port-au-Prince, his beach house and his mother's home, for a year, at what the State Department calls fair-market value.
NEWS
By Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | June 28, 1993
UNITED NATIONS -- Thousands of Haitians gathered outside the U.N. Plaza to show solidarity for ousted President Jean-Bertrand Aristide as he prepared to negotiate with the man who toppled him from office -- Lt. Gen. Raoul Cedras.U.N.-mediated talks aimed at restoring democracy in Haiti began on Governors Island, but there was no face-to-face meeting between the two leaders yesterday.Dante Caputo, U.N. special envoy for Haiti, met separately with Mr. Aristide and General Cedras and said there was "common ground."
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | September 20, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Much depends now on what happens on the ground in Haiti, but the agreement struck with its military dictators in the short term at least should get President Clinton out of an extremely perilous political corner at home.The word that the planes taking paratroopers to invade Haiti were already in the air when the deal was completed by former President Jimmy Carter in Port-au-Prince told the world that Clinton in this instance meant what he had long threatened.At the same time, the arrangement meant substituting for the ugly word "invasion" the less politically volatile word "occupation" under the United Nations mandate.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 9, 1994
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- Where is Lt. Gen. Raoul Cedras?One report had the Haitian army commander at the airport, leaving for exile in Spain. No, said another source, he left his house at 2 a.m. for the Dominican Republic. All wrong, went another account, the general and his wife were at their beach house.But despite the --es from airport to border crossing by reporters, there was no credible evidence that General Cedras had gone anywhere, nor that he intended to, at least for now.In fact, General Cedras, who had not been seen in public for more than 24 hours, turned up yesterday afternoon for his regular meeting with U.S. Ambassador William L. Swing and Lt. Gen. Hugh Shelton, commander of the 20,000 U.S. troops here.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 25, 1994
PANAMA CITY, Panama -- For three years, he ruled Haiti with an iron fist. But now, officials say, Lt. Gen. Raoul Cedras sits in a rundown hotel room writing his memoirs and worrying if his children will be harassed at school.Since arriving in Panama on Oct. 13, he has remained secluded in the Riande Continental Hotel near the airport. People who have visited General Cedras said he had spent most of the day working on the memoirs on a computer.The general and his wife, Yannick, and their three children are sharing a small two-bedroom suite in a hotel that a diplomat rated as "1 1/2 stars, with musty carpets and tacky furnishings from the 1970s."
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 14, 1994
WASHINGTON -- After three years of diplomacy and three weeks of U.S. military occupation, the end of Haiti's dictatorship came down to a real-estate deal.The just-retired Haitian strongman, Lt. Gen. Raoul Cedras, and his wife, Yannick, demanded compensation for the property they were leaving behind in Haiti.The United States obliged. After first refusing to buy the property, U.S. officials agreed to rent General Cedras' hillside mansion outside Port-au-Prince, his beach house and his mother's home, for a year, at what the State Department calls fair-market value.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Bill Glauber and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Correspondents Sun staff writer Mark Matthews contributed to this article | October 13, 1994
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- As the country celebrated, Lt. Gen. Raoul Cedras hunkered down in his hilltop house yesterday awaiting Panama's permission to begin his exile there, and Emile Jonassaint, the army-appointed president, formally resigned.With the former dictator reduced to near irrelevancy, the focus for most Haitians turned sharply yesterday from his departure to Saturday's arrival of democratically elected President Jean-Bertrand Aristide.Reflecting the new order of priorities, U.S. officials dubbed yesterday "Arrival Minus Three."
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Bill Glauber and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Correspondents | October 12, 1994
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- As the Haitian dictatorship finally imploded yesterday, the United States found itself effectively running Haiti.Lt. Gen. Raoul Cedras was packed and ready for exile. The country's puppet president and military-appointed ministers vacated their offices to make way for the new democratic government.But for the moment, U.S. Ambassador William L. Swing and military commander Lt. Gen. Hugh Shelton are in control of the country, pending the return Saturday of President Jean-Bertrand Aristide.
NEWS
October 11, 1994
Lt. Gen. Raoul Cedras resigned as Haiti's military leader and ** had to be protected from the crowd of Haitians. . He is expected to go into exile soon.General Cedras' successor, Maj. Gen. Jean-Claude Duperval, asked his men to emulate the example of the U.S. military. "We want an orderly, disciplined army, answerable to the law," he said. It will also be a smaller army: Jean-Bertrand Aristide has pledged to trim it from 7,450 to 1,500 men and to transfer police functions to a civilian force.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 11, 1994
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- They are the ones left behind.L They are privates and colonels, traffic cops and inspectors.Yesterday, on the front steps of a colonial-style headquarters, surrounded by tens of thousands of jeering pro-democracy demonstrators, they watched as Lt. Gen. Raoul Cedras gave up leadership of the Haitian military for a life in exile."
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,Staff Writer | November 1, 1993
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- Right-wing, pro-military parties called on exiled President Jean-Bertrand Aristide and United Nations envoy Dante Caputo to resign yesterday to make way for a provisional government that would orchestrate new elections.The groups led by the military's newly formed political party -- the Front for the Advancement and Progress of Haiti (FRAPH) -- also demanded the resignation of army chief Lt. Gen. Raoul Cedras. But that move was considered a ploy to demonstrate their independence from the ragtag army that controls Haiti.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | October 4, 1994
Those congressmen trying to pull troops out of Haiti by a specified date must have Lt. Gen. Cedras for a constituent.Most members of the new Supreme Court are under 70 and no one knows what to expect.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 11, 1994
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- With as much dignity as a taunted, deposed dictator can muster, Lt. Gen. Raoul Cedras yesterday ceded military power here and prepared for exile, leaving the leadership of this benighted country to democratically elected President Jean-Bertrand Aristide.In Washington, President Clinton announced that Father Aristide will return to Haiti Saturday to resume his "rightful place" as the country's first democratically elected president.Mr. Clinton, who spoke to the nation about Iraq and Haiti, credited U.S. troops for putting Haiti back on the road to democracy.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 10, 1994
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- Haitian dictator Lt. Gen. Raoul RTC Cedras will step down today, ending three years of military rule and terror here and clearing the way for the return of democratically elected President Jean-Bertrand Aristide later this week.In a plan approved Saturday by Washington, General Cedras will be replaced by the army's No. 2 man, Maj. Gen. Jean-Claude Duperval, said Col. Jean-Robert Gabriel, a spokesman for the Haitian high command.Also set to leave is Brig. Gen. Philippe Biamby, the army chief of staff and a leader of the September 1991 coup that ousted Father Aristide.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.