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NEWS
October 6, 2002
SATURDAY, OCT. 19 10 a.m.: camps open to the public 10:30 a.m.: side saddle demonstration (field): horseback riding and jumping using side saddle, Ann Moss 11 a.m.: infantry drills 11 a.m.: the Foundation for the Preservation of Civil War History (tent): converse with General Lee, General Longstreet and others in a public discussion of 1864 events 11:45 a.m.: field music 12:30 p.m.: cavalry demonstration 12:30 p.m.: the Gilmore Light Ensemble with Doug Jimerson (tent): tenor Doug Jimerson performing Civil War songs accompanied by a five-member ensemble playing period instruments 1:30 p.m.: signal demonstration 1:30 p.m. "Irregular Warfare in Northwestern Virginia," John Heatwole (tent)
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NEWS
October 10, 2004
OCT. 15 Noon: Camps open to public; Belle Grove Plantation open 1:30 p.m.: Formation 2 p.m.: Middletown Parade 4 p.m.: Tactical demonstration 7 p.m.: Descendants reception OCT. 16 9 a.m.: Camps open to public; battalion drills 10 a.m.: Belle Grove Plantation open; Confederate cavalry demonstration; ladies fashion show and tea 11 a.m.: Union artillery demonstration 12:30 p.m.: Formation 1:30 p.m.: 2nd Kernstown Battle 3:30 p.m.: Hospital demonstration...
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NEWS
October 10, 1999
These five men who served during the Civil War won the Medal of Honor twice:Thomas W. Custer, 2nd lieutenant, Company B, 6th Michigan Cavalry, received the Medal of Honor for action at Namozine Church, Va., April 3, 1865, where he took about a dozen Confederate prisoners and their regiment's colors; the second award was for action at Sayler's Creek, Va., April 6, 1865, where he was wounded capturing the colors of another Confederate regiment.Frank D. Baldwin, captain, Company D, 19th Michigan Infantry, was decorated for action July 12, 1864, at Peach Tree Creek, Ga., where he entered the Confederate line and captured two officers and a Georgia regiment's guidon; for his second award he was a 1st lieutenant, 5th U.S. Infantry, Nov. 8, 1874, at McClellans Creek, Texas, when with two companies he attacked a superior number of Indians in a strong position to rescue two white girls, who would have been killed if Baldwin had delayed action until reinforcements arrived.
NEWS
By Michael Hilt and Michael Hilt,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2004
The Union forces encamped at Cedar Creek remained stunned and battered as the surprise battle raged on. Confusion and surprise were felt by all as the Confederates pulled off a completely successful surprise attack. Lt. Gen. Jubal A. Early's men attacked the federal position, and the Union troops soon now found themselves scattered, dazed, and in the town of Middletown. The Union would flounder, stragglers, injured, and broken soldiers, until the arrival of Maj. Gen. Philip H. Sheridan.
NEWS
October 10, 1999
The Civil War re-enactment at Cedar Creek, near Middletown, Va., is unusual in that it takes place on the actual 1864 battleground. Proceeds from the event, sponsored by the Cedar Creek Battlefield Foundation, go toward the preservation of the site, acquisition of additional land, restoration of 1832 Heater House on the battlefield, and preservation of writings and artifacts relating to the battle. This year's re-enactment marks the 135th anniversary of the battle.
FEATURES
By Charley Mitchell and Charley Mitchell,Special to The Sun | July 30, 1995
There is plenty to see amid the pastoral farms and hills of Virginia's Shenandoah Valley, which, even today, looks as though it could be 1864 all over again.Stretching 150 miles from Winchester to Roanoke and sandwiched between the Blue Ridge and Allegheny mountains, the valley was host to 15 Civil War battles between 1862 and 1864, as Union troops fought to prevent the Confederates from using the area to strategic advantage. The October 1864 battle of Cedar Creek, 12 miles south of Winchester, resulted in a badly needed Union victory.
NEWS
By Andrew D. Faith and Andrew D. Faith,SUN STAFF | October 11, 1998
On the night of Oct. 18, 1864, Maj. Gen. Philip H. Sheridan's Union army was encamped on three low parallel ridges north of Cedar Creek. Confederate Lt. Gen. Jubal A. Early's force was four miles west at the base of Fisher's Hill.At the left of the Union army, farthest from Early's troops, was Maj. Gen. George Crook's 8th Corps. Crook's position was protected on the flank by the Shenandoah River; at this point Massanutten Mountain was very steep, and the river ran around it. There was no road, and the area was guarded by a cavalry picket.
NEWS
October 10, 1999
The following special dispatch of the New York World gives a graphic account of the great battle fought on Wednesday last in the Shenandoah Valley:[Special Dispatch to the New York World.]Full Account of the Battle -- Our Forces at First Surprised -- Subsequent Victory -- Splendid Conduct of the Soldiers -- What has been Gained by the Victory.Headquarters Army of the Shenandoah, October 19 -- via Washington, Oct. 20. -- Another sanguinary battle -- the fortunes of which were in the beginning, apparently adverse, but the results of which are quite as encouraging as those of any which has preceded it in the Valley -- has consumed the entire day, from dawn to nightfall.
NEWS
By Luciana Lopez and Luciana Lopez,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2003
The hardest part about planning this year's re-enactment of the Battle of Cedar Creek might be convincing people that the re-enactment is really happening. Last December, the National Park Service included the battlefield in the boundaries of the new Cedar Creek and Belle Grove National Historical Park. Because other national parks don't allow re-enactments, many thought the Cedar Creek battle was done for. But this national park is a little different, since the Cedar Creek Battlefield Foundation, which puts on the re-enactments, will retain ownership of the land used in the events.
NEWS
By Andrew D. Faith and Andrew D. Faith,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1998
Of the many threads of history woven into the battle of Cedar Creek, one of the most unusual and least susceptible to re-enactment is the role of Confederate Col. John Singleton Mosby's Partisan Rangers.Mosby's Rangers, formally the 43rd Virginia Cavalry Battalion, do not appear as combatants at Cedar Creek or in the Shenandoah Valley battles leading up to that engagement - Lynchburg, Kernstown, Opequon or Fishers Hill - for although they were active in the valley, they were not part of Lt. Gen. Jubal A. Early's command.
NEWS
By Meaghan C. Ginnetty and Meaghan C. Ginnetty,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2004
Ranked as one of the two largest battles fought in the Shenandoah Valley, the Battle of Cedar Creek was the last major battle of Union Maj. Gen. Philip H. Sheridan's 1864 Valley Campaign. The fighting began at dawn on Oct. 19, 1864, when the Confederate Army, under the command of Lt. Gen. Jubal A. Early, carried out one of the most daring and successful surprise attacks of the war. According to Dan Reigle and the Cincinnati Civil War Round Table, Early had two concerns when he entered into battle: to hold Sheridan's forces in the Shenandoah Valley and to strike a blow where possible.
NEWS
By Katherine Denoyer and Katherine Denoyer,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2004
The Battle of Cedar Creek was fought on a foggy day. So it is appropriate that some of the details of that day are just as foggy. Brig. Gen. John Howard Kitching was among the Union officers who fought in the battle, and he died from wounds inflicted during the battle. Although he was a general officer, little is known about his life and even less is noted in most histories of the battle. John Howard Kitching was named after his father, John Benjamin Kitching, a merchant who was born in Horsforth, England, on April 20, 1818.
NEWS
By Darl Stephenson and Darl Stephenson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 10, 2004
In the early morning of Oct. 19, 1864, the Confederate Army of the Valley led by Lt. Gen. Jubal A. Early attacked the Union Army of the Shenandoah under Maj. Gen. Philip H. Sheridan by surprise at Cedar Creek. The first unit of the Union Army to feel the wrath of that Confederate attack was the little "Army of West Virginia" (AWV) or 8th Corps led by Brig. Gen. George Crook, now much reduced in numbers after hard campaigning and fighting since May. It was hardly an army and not much of a corps because of these reduced numbers.
NEWS
By Katherine Tiernan and Katherine Tiernan,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2003
Maj. Gen. Joseph B. Kershaw had a distinguished military career in the Confederate army, the high point being his role in the surprise attack at Cedar Creek. Kershaw was a South Carolina lawyer who attained his rank in the early days of the Civil War through his social status. His competent fighting throughout the war helped him rise through the ranks to become a major general. Under the command of Lt. Gen. Jubal A. Early, the Confederate army launched a coordinated attack against the Union troops in the pre-dawn hours of Oct. 19, 1864.
NEWS
By Luciana Lopez and Luciana Lopez,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2003
The hardest part about planning this year's re-enactment of the Battle of Cedar Creek might be convincing people that the re-enactment is really happening. Last December, the National Park Service included the battlefield in the boundaries of the new Cedar Creek and Belle Grove National Historical Park. Because other national parks don't allow re-enactments, many thought the Cedar Creek battle was done for. But this national park is a little different, since the Cedar Creek Battlefield Foundation, which puts on the re-enactments, will retain ownership of the land used in the events.
NEWS
October 12, 2003
Saturday, Oct. 18 9:30 a.m.:gates open to public 10 a.m.: camps open; lecture, "The Boys of Company C," by John Deppen; the Foundation for the Preservation of Civil War History; side-saddle demonstration 10:30 a.m.:field infantry drills 11:30 a.m.:lecture, "The Life & Times of John Singleton Mosby," by Dave Goetz 11:30 a.m.:field music 12:30 p.m.:cavalry demonstration 1 p.m.: the Gilmore Light Ensemble with tenor Doug Jimerson 1:30 p.m.:signal demonstration;...
NEWS
By Michelle Lawyer and Michelle Lawyer,Special to the Sun | October 10, 1999
Organizers in Middletown, Va., are putting the final touches on preparations for the 135th anniversary of the Civil War battle of Cedar Creek. The event, to be held Oct. 15-17, is expected to attract up to 6,000 re-enactors.Admission to the re-enactment is $20 for all three days; $15 for a weekend pass; and $10 daily. Children 12 years old and under are admitted free. Parking is free.To obtain tickets, contact the Cedar Creek Battlefield Foundation at P.O. Box 229, Middletown, Va. 22645, or call 540-869-2064.
NEWS
By Kevin Canberg and Kevin Canberg,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 6, 2002
Maj. Gen. Philip H. Sheridan had spent the night before the battle of Cedar Creek in Winchester, Va., resting after a war strategy meeting with Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in Washington. When he awoke that morning to the sound of cannon and guns, he quickly saddled his horse and headed for his troops, expecting to witness little more than a skirmish. As he galloped through town, however, he saw something much more dreadful: His men had been routed and were staggering through the town, dazed by a Confederate surprise attack.
NEWS
By Luciana Lopez and Luciana Lopez,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 12, 2003
In late July, when a visitor to the new Cedar Creek and Belle Grove National Historical Park walked into the headquarters of the Cedar Creek Battlefield Foundation, Danny Ambrose got a reminder of just how far the national park still has to grow. Ambrose, the assistant administrator at the foundation, remembers that the man walked in, took a quick look around and asked incredulously, "Is this it?" That visitor was blunter than most, but he wasn't too far off the mark. With almost no funding for the moment and the prospect of a planning process that takes years, Cedar Creek and Belle Grove National Historical Park in Virginia faces an uphill battle to become the information-packed site that many think it could be. "The transition of the creation of a national park is one of those things where it is definitely a slow process," said Sandy Rives, the Virginia director of the National Park Service and acting administrator for the new park until someone else is hired.
NEWS
By Amanda Angel and Amanda Angel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 12, 2003
It was two months after the Confederacy's decisive victory in May 1863 at the Battle of Chancellorsville, Va., and Gen. Robert E. Lee was preparing his army for a full-fledged invasion of the North. The time for another critical battle was drawing nearer as both cavalries rode through the county trying to probe the other side. To disguise his preparations, Lee sent Maj. Gen. J.E.B. Stuart and all but two cavalry brigades to confuse Union intelligence. Meanwhile, Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker, commander of the Union Army of the Potomac, sent the forces under Maj. Gen. Alfred Pleasonton to search for information on Lee's position.
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