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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | March 20, 1994
Luciano Pavarotti's successor as opera's biggest draw is not balding, fat and homely. In fact, the new King of Opera is a beautiful young Queen.People who know about Cecilia Bartoli are probably smart enough to know they won't be able to get a ticket to her recital of obscure Italian baroque and classical songs in Washington Friday. The Kennedy Center's 2,800 seat Concert Hall was sold out more than six months ago -- as was every other theater the 27-year-old Italian mezzo-soprano is scheduled to visit on her current American tour.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 24, 2002
NEW YORK - Cecilia Bartoli, the mezzo who put the color back into coloratura, spends most of her musical life in the past. Lately, she's been spending her present there, too. And loving it. The Italian singer just arrived back in the States the old-fashioned way - by boat - to prepare for an East Coast tour with a stop at the Kennedy Center for the Washington Performing Arts Society tomorrow night. "It was a fantastic experience," Bartoli, 36, says, exuding a quiet glamour in a posh hotel steps from Lincoln Center.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 24, 2002
NEW YORK - Cecilia Bartoli, the mezzo who put the color back into coloratura, spends most of her musical life in the past. Lately, she's been spending her present there, too. And loving it. The Italian singer just arrived back in the States the old-fashioned way - by boat - to prepare for an East Coast tour with a stop at the Kennedy Center for the Washington Performing Arts Society tomorrow night. "It was a fantastic experience," Bartoli, 36, says, exuding a quiet glamour in a posh hotel steps from Lincoln Center.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | March 20, 1994
Luciano Pavarotti's successor as opera's biggest draw is not balding, fat and homely. In fact, the new King of Opera is a beautiful young Queen.People who know about Cecilia Bartoli are probably smart enough to know they won't be able to get a ticket to her recital of obscure Italian baroque and classical songs in Washington Friday. The Kennedy Center's 2,800 seat Concert Hall was sold out more than six months ago -- as was every other theater the 27-year-old Italian mezzo-soprano is scheduled to visit on her current American tour.
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January 8, 1993
Here is a list of nominees for some categories for the 35th annual Grammy Awards announced yesterday.1. Record of the Year: "Tears In Heaven," Eric Clapton; "Achy Breaky Heart," Billy Ray Cyrus; "Constant Craving," k.d. lang; "Save the Best for Last," Vanessa Williams; "Beauty and the Beast," Celine Dion and Peabo Bryson.2. Album of the Year: "Unplugged," Eric Clapton; "Ingenue," k.d. lang; "Diva," Annie Lennox; "Achtung Baby," U2; "Beauty and the Beast," various artists.3. Song of the Year: "Tears in Heaven," Eric Clapton; "Achy Breaky Heart," Billy Ray Cyrus; "Beauty and the Beast," Celine Dion and Peabo Bryson; "Constant Craving," k.d. lang; "Save the Best for Last," Vanessa Williams.
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February 19, 2004
Salieri strikes back Poor Antonio Salieri. His brilliant career as a composer was going wonderfully until Mozart showed up. After that, it was all downhill. Salieri was not only overshadowed by Mozart; he even got hounded by suspicions that he was somehow responsible for Mozart's death. Thanks to the play and movie Amadeus, Salieri's reputation took a particularly rough turn. But, thanks to phenomenal mezzo-soprano Cecilia Bartoli, his talent just might start to get the respect it deserves.
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By BILLBOARD | August 18, 1996
For years, Keith Richards has indulged a habit not uncommon among rock and rollers: listening to classical music.In fact, it was the Rolling Stones' publicly proclaimed taste for Mozart and Bach that helped inspire "Exile on Classical Street," an innovative attempt by London Records to get the younger set hip to the sounds of yesterday while raising money for the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences (NARAS) Foundation."Exile on Classical Street" is a compilation of the favorite classical pieces of a dozen of the world's biggest pop stars.
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By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 8, 1997
WASHINGTON -- For a superstar, the young mezzo Cecilia Bartoli is blessedly free of mannerisms, attitude and shtick. In fact, the only evidence of her diva status is that her recital Sunday afternoon at Constitution Hall started 15 minutes late.Another nice thing: While her best-selling CDs are almost all collections of favorites, her recital programs cover more esoteric ground.Bartoli's voice -- limber, lush and infinitely versatile -- is so beautiful that she could sing a program of soda commercials (or Philip Glass!
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2014
Scrolling through the classical winners of the 2014 Grammys, I was struck by the tilt toward the contemporary, or at least off-the-well-worn-path repertoire. I have no penetrating insight into this. I don't even know if it's a trend in recent years, since I rarely remember who wins and I'm too lazy to go back and look at the archives. But this year's list of winners seems pretty cool. The most old-time, mainstream music to get the nod was in the Best Orchestral Performance category, won by the Minnesota Orchestra for its highly valued recordings on BIS Records of the First Symphony and the much less frequently encountered Fourth Symphony by Sibelius with conductor Osmo Vanska.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 10, 2005
The Washington Performing Arts Society will mark its 40th anniversary season with the premiere of a gospel work commissioned for the occasion and the presentation of a cross-section of classical and jazz talent. The 2005-2006 lineup includes a dozen events in the newly opened Music Center at Strathmore, as well as several dozen more at the Kennedy Center and other Washington venues. Although WPAS recently cut back on the quantity of touring orchestras it presents, the quality of the list remains high.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 18, 1996
Massenet's "Werther" is perhaps the greatest tenor vehicle in the French operatic literature. Tenors love "Werther" because it gives them unparalleled opportunities to do what they do best: Sing all night long about how desperately in love they are and how unhappy it makes them. It is to the tenor what Shakespeare's "Hamlet" is to the actor.It is all the more remarkable, therefore, when a production of this nTC opera is dominated by the mezzo-soprano who is the hero's love interest and source of misery.
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By Judith Green | June 19, 1998
For a real oxymoron, consider that the first film of a complete opera was made during the silent era: "Der Rosenkavalier" in 1924. It was screened at a benefit in London, with composer Richard Strauss conducting its huge orchestra and all the singers in the pit of the Tivoli Theater.Nowadays, opera for the camera is fairly common -- not in theaters, maybe, but certainly on television. And, in fact, the "Opera on Film" series of the Maryland Arts Festival at Towson University is actually opera on video, projected on a theater-size screen.
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