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Cecil Rhodes

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NEWS
By Pat O'Malley | February 16, 1992
My first reaction when I heard that the football stadium at Chesapeake High had been named after a building engineer was, "Whatttt? I can't believe it."Never before had a county football stadium or athletic facility been named after a custodial type.But after finding out what 62-year-old Cecil Rhodes of the Chelsea Beach area has meant to Chesapeake over the last 15 years, I understand it.Cecil Rhodes Stadium at Chesapeake stands for something that is missing all too much in our modern world -- a person caring for his fellow man. He is a link to the past when everyone was a neighbor, especially someone in need.
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NEWS
By BRADLEY OLSON AND JUSTIN FENTON and BRADLEY OLSON AND JUSTIN FENTON,SUN REPORTERS | November 21, 2005
Three seniors and a recent graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy won Rhodes scholarships yesterday, the most in a single year in the service academy's history and more than any other university in the nation this year. The 32 U.S. winners of the prestigious study grants to attend Oxford University in England included three from Maryland: one former enlisted Marine from Bethesda who dropped out of high school five years ago and ranks first in his class at the Naval Academy; and two Duke University students who graduated in the same class from Montgomery Blair High School in Silver Spring.
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NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | December 7, 1998
A 20-year-old Dominican immigrant and Loyola College student who developed an interest in science while teaching himself English was named a Rhodes scholar during the weekend.Jose Vargas of Gaithersburg is one of 32 American students who received the prestigious award. Vargas plans to study biochemistry for two years at Oxford University in England after he graduates in May. He is Loyola's first Rhodes scholar."Getting [named a Rhodes scholar] is the kind of thing you're so excited about because you're so focused on trying to do your best," Vargas said yesterday.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | December 7, 1998
A 20-year-old Dominican immigrant and Loyola College student who developed an interest in science while teaching himself English was named a Rhodes scholar during the weekend.Jose Vargas of Gaithersburg is one of 32 American students who received the prestigious award. Vargas plans to study biochemistry for two years at Oxford University in England after he graduates in May. He is Loyola's first Rhodes scholar."Getting [named a Rhodes scholar] is the kind of thing you're so excited about because you're so focused on trying to do your best," Vargas said yesterday.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | December 9, 1996
Joshua Civin is a New Haven, Conn., alderman. And a volunteer in an AmeriCorps project who works with middle-school students from poor urban neighborhoods. And a summa cum laude graduate of Yale University.And, as of Saturday, the Baltimore-bred Civin is a Rhodes Scholar."I think he was actually screaming when he called to tell us," his mother, Nancy Civin, said last night of his call home with the good news. "He was very, very excited."Civin, 22, a graduate of Gilman School, was one of 32 Americans selected over the weekend for the prestigious two-year scholarships to Oxford University in England.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | March 13, 1991
They don't sing "Diamonds Are a Girl's Best Friend" on tonight's National Geographic special, though they could easily change the lyrics and croon "Diamonds are DeBeers' Best Friend."A gentle chronicling of the monopolistic control of the world's diamond market by the DeBeers firm is but one of the many fascinating aspects of "Splendid Stones," another quality hour from National Geographic that will be on Maryland Public Television, channels 22 and 67, tonight at 8 o'clock.Diamonds might be at the pinnacle of the stone trade, but this documentary takes you around the world to see the full panoply of gems that have fascinated mankind for thousands of years.
NEWS
By BRADLEY OLSON AND JUSTIN FENTON and BRADLEY OLSON AND JUSTIN FENTON,SUN REPORTERS | November 21, 2005
Three seniors and a recent graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy won Rhodes scholarships yesterday, the most in a single year in the service academy's history and more than any other university in the nation this year. The 32 U.S. winners of the prestigious study grants to attend Oxford University in England included three from Maryland: one former enlisted Marine from Bethesda who dropped out of high school five years ago and ranks first in his class at the Naval Academy; and two Duke University students who graduated in the same class from Montgomery Blair High School in Silver Spring.
NEWS
July 28, 2005
On July 25, 2005, WILLIAM LEE "Bill" BENDEN of Glen Burnie, beloved husband of the late Anna M. Benden, dearest son of Cecil R. Rhodes and the late Amanda E. Rhodes, loving brother of Robin E. Carpenter. He is also survived by many loving cousins, aunts and uncles. The family will receive visitors at the family owned Singleton Funeral Home, 1 Second Avenue, S.W., (at Crain Highway) Glen Burnie, from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P. M on Friday. The Funeral Ceremony will be held on Saturday at 1 P.M. in the funeral home chapel.
NEWS
By Lars-Erik Nelson | December 28, 1992
NEW YORK -- Fleeing the mad scramble of the malls escaping the noise and babble of what is supposed to be a serene holiday, I ducked into a secondhand bookstore. There, lying dusty and forlorn on a bottom shelf at the very back was a veritable time machine, a World Almanac for 1902.Its cover was crumbling into dry fragments. But its statistics, its summaries and its ads preserved a vivid picture of the world you would have found if you woke up 90 years ago this morning.New York was booming.
NEWS
By Anita Finkel and Anita Finkel,Special to The Sun | March 12, 1995
"Traitors Gate," by Anne Perry. 411 pages. New York: Fawcett Columbine. $21.50In the history of Anne Perry's career, "Traitors Gate" will go down as the last book she wrote before her secret past as a convicted murderer became known. Shortly before this, her 20th mystery novel, was published, the film "Heavenly Creatures" was released, depicting the obsessive friendship between two New Zealand schoolgirls who in 1954 bludgeoned to death the mother of one of them. It soon came out that Perry, a quiet-living resident of the Scottish Highlands, was in reality Juliet Hulme, the more glamorous of the two 15-year-old felons (and the one whose mother was not killed)
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | December 9, 1996
Joshua Civin is a New Haven, Conn., alderman. And a volunteer in an AmeriCorps project who works with middle-school students from poor urban neighborhoods. And a summa cum laude graduate of Yale University.And, as of Saturday, the Baltimore-bred Civin is a Rhodes Scholar."I think he was actually screaming when he called to tell us," his mother, Nancy Civin, said last night of his call home with the good news. "He was very, very excited."Civin, 22, a graduate of Gilman School, was one of 32 Americans selected over the weekend for the prestigious two-year scholarships to Oxford University in England.
NEWS
By Pat O'Malley | February 16, 1992
My first reaction when I heard that the football stadium at Chesapeake High had been named after a building engineer was, "Whatttt? I can't believe it."Never before had a county football stadium or athletic facility been named after a custodial type.But after finding out what 62-year-old Cecil Rhodes of the Chelsea Beach area has meant to Chesapeake over the last 15 years, I understand it.Cecil Rhodes Stadium at Chesapeake stands for something that is missing all too much in our modern world -- a person caring for his fellow man. He is a link to the past when everyone was a neighbor, especially someone in need.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | March 13, 1991
They don't sing "Diamonds Are a Girl's Best Friend" on tonight's National Geographic special, though they could easily change the lyrics and croon "Diamonds are DeBeers' Best Friend."A gentle chronicling of the monopolistic control of the world's diamond market by the DeBeers firm is but one of the many fascinating aspects of "Splendid Stones," another quality hour from National Geographic that will be on Maryland Public Television, channels 22 and 67, tonight at 8 o'clock.Diamonds might be at the pinnacle of the stone trade, but this documentary takes you around the world to see the full panoply of gems that have fascinated mankind for thousands of years.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,sun reporter | November 20, 2006
Two college students with ties to Maryland were among 32 Americans selected to be 2007 Rhodes scholars, it was announced yesterday. They are Casey N. Cep, a senior at Harvard University who grew up on Maryland's Eastern Shore, and Sean A. Genis, a senior at the U.S. Naval Academy who is from Pennsylvania. Winning the scholarship means both students will spend two or three years studying at Oxford University in England starting in October. Cep and Genis were selected from among 896 applicants at 340 colleges and universities in the United States.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kay Chubbuck and By Kay Chubbuck,Special to the Sun | March 24, 2002
The Impressionist, by Hari Kunzru. Dutton. 383 pages. $24.95. Born in the shadows of the Taj Mahal, Pran Nath Razdan is "the impressionist": a half-Indian, half-English boy who wanders through Hari Kunzru's first novel in an inconclusive search for his identity. Part parody, part pastiche and part picaresque, The Impressionist is the story of that journey, and of what it means never to belong. We begin, appropriately, in the desert, as Pran's father, the perspiring Ronald Forrester, encounters the mad beauty Amrita on the way to her betrothal.
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