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Cecil Calvert

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BUSINESS
By Charles Belfoure | June 6, 1999
A history of ground rentsThe roots of the ground rent system go back to medieval England, when tenant farmers paid rent to landlords in either money or farm goods.When Cecil Calvert, the second Lord Baltimore, received a land grant encompassing the present state of Maryland from King Charles I, it was on the condition that Calvert pay the crown a yearly ground rent of two Indian arrowheads and one-fifth of all gold and silver found in the state.Calvert brought the ground rent system with him when he colonized Maryland in 1634.
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EXPLORE
SPECIAL TO THE AEGIS | June 25, 2012
Boy Scouts from around the Baltimore area gathered in Annapolis last week to witness a historic event involving the state's transfer of ownership to part of the Broad Creek Memorial Scout Reservation in northern Harford County. At a Board of Public Works meeting in the Governor's Reception Room in the State House, under a portrait of George Calvert, the first Lord Baltimore, Gov. Martin O'Malley signed an actual sheepskin land patent, granting 19.014 acres of previously state-owned land at Broad Creek to the Baltimore Area Council, Boy Scouts of America.
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NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | July 24, 1993
When the auctioneer's hammer bangs down on Lot No. 1 Monday afternoon, a tiny, shiny piece of Maryland history will have a new home.The Lord Baltimore sixpence was struck at the Royal Mint in the Tower of London in the winter of 1658-1659 for circulation in the Calvert family's American colony.Few examples of Lord Baltimore's coinage survive, and the silver coin is expected to fetch at least $5,000 at the 1 p.m. auction by the Superior Galleries of Beverly Hills at the Omni Inner Harbor Hotel.
TRAVEL
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2010
The first thing to know about Maryland's Religious Freedom Byway is that religion in Colonial Maryland was rarely free. "It came at a cost to everybody, Catholics in particular," Sheila Smith told us at the courthouse in Port Tobacco, an 18 t h - century shipping center 35 miles south of Washington. "They had to have their prayers and services on the sly. Eventually, there were Jews and Quakers and Methodists. Of course, they didn't have an easy time, either." Smith, the official historian of the Society for the Restoration of Port Tobacco, was one of several guides to make that point as we made our way across Southern Maryland, following the federally recognized route that traces the peregrinations of the state's early European settlers.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 7, 1996
LONDON -- Rush hour on the Thames River. Pleasure boats and tourist vessels jockey for position in the murky water like commuters on the Beltway. Hordes of tourists line the riverbanks by the Tower of London. And there, just around the bend, comes the tallest, leanest ship of them all: the Pride of Baltimore II, sails unfurled and cannons booming."On this ship you sail into town, show what you've got, and then, take it all down and go boast about it," said the Pride II's captain, Jan Miles of Fells Point.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | December 4, 1990
ST. MARY'S CITY -- Archaeologists digging in a meadow here said today they have uncovered what they believe is the crypt of Maryland's founding family, the Calverts, beneath the ruins of the 300-year-old Great Brick Chapel.A week of digging in what had been the north arm of the cross-shaped church ended today in the discovery of not one, but three, gray lead coffins.The coffins, bowed by the weight of the earth above them, lay side by side in a pit 3 feet deep and about 5 feet square.Henry Miller, chief archaeologist for Historic St. Mary's City, said the prestigious location of the crypt within the chapel and the cost and rarity of lead coffins in the 1600s led him to conclude that the coffins belong to Maryland's founding family.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | February 18, 1991
Clyde Collins Snow, the forensic scientist who identified the remains of the Nazi "Angel of Death," Joseph Mengele, has agreed to help Maryland archaeologists plan a study of the remains in three lead coffins found during excavations last fall in St. Mary's City.The coffins, found within the ruins of the Great Brick Chapel at Maryland's first Colonial capital, are believed to be what's left of the crypt of the Calverts, Maryland's founding family.Snow, the author of "Witnesses from the Grave: The Stories Bones Tell," is to serve on a committee of scientists that will meet in March to discuss methods of studying and identifying the remains.
TRAVEL
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2010
The first thing to know about Maryland's Religious Freedom Byway is that religion in Colonial Maryland was rarely free. "It came at a cost to everybody, Catholics in particular," Sheila Smith told us at the courthouse in Port Tobacco, an 18 t h - century shipping center 35 miles south of Washington. "They had to have their prayers and services on the sly. Eventually, there were Jews and Quakers and Methodists. Of course, they didn't have an easy time, either." Smith, the official historian of the Society for the Restoration of Port Tobacco, was one of several guides to make that point as we made our way across Southern Maryland, following the federally recognized route that traces the peregrinations of the state's early European settlers.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | December 5, 1990
ST. MARY'S CITY -- Having discovered what they believe is the 300-year-old crypt of Maryland's founding Calvert family, archaeologists here are now beginning to puzzle over what to do with the three lead coffins found in the grave.A key question, they say, is whether the sealed coffins should be opened."We really don't know yet what we're going to do," said Henry Miller, chief archaeologist for Historic St. Mary's City.The lost crypt was rediscovered during a week-long excavation in what was once the north arm of the 323-year-old Great Brick Chapel in St. Mary's City.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2002
At the Westbury Hotel in London the other day, Morton & Eden Ltd., a coin auctioneer and Sotheby's associate, offered for sale 19 recently discovered Maryland sixpences that date to 1659. Don't bother rushing upstairs to look in that pile of castoff change lying on your bureau for any examples of this rarer-than-rare coinage. It's not going to happen. These extraordinary coins, part of the estate of Mary Fane Fry, are the second oldest to be produced in America, the first being in Massachusetts in 1652.
NEWS
By GREG GARLAND and GREG GARLAND,SUN REPORTER | January 17, 2006
Six people died in four separate traffic accidents over the holiday weekend in Baltimore and in Cecil, Calvert and Dorchester counties, authorities reported yesterday. Two people were killed and four others were injured in the city accident, which occurred about 2:30 a.m. Sunday at East Cold Spring Lane and St. Georges Avenue in North Baltimore. Killed were Wanda Holt, 48, of the 600 block of McCabe Ave. and her son, Ronnell Holt, whose age and address were unavailable, said Agent Donny Moses, a police spokesman.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2002
At the Westbury Hotel in London the other day, Morton & Eden Ltd., a coin auctioneer and Sotheby's associate, offered for sale 19 recently discovered Maryland sixpences that date to 1659. Don't bother rushing upstairs to look in that pile of castoff change lying on your bureau for any examples of this rarer-than-rare coinage. It's not going to happen. These extraordinary coins, part of the estate of Mary Fane Fry, are the second oldest to be produced in America, the first being in Massachusetts in 1652.
BUSINESS
By Charles Belfoure | June 6, 1999
A history of ground rentsThe roots of the ground rent system go back to medieval England, when tenant farmers paid rent to landlords in either money or farm goods.When Cecil Calvert, the second Lord Baltimore, received a land grant encompassing the present state of Maryland from King Charles I, it was on the condition that Calvert pay the crown a yearly ground rent of two Indian arrowheads and one-fifth of all gold and silver found in the state.Calvert brought the ground rent system with him when he colonized Maryland in 1634.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 7, 1996
LONDON -- Rush hour on the Thames River. Pleasure boats and tourist vessels jockey for position in the murky water like commuters on the Beltway. Hordes of tourists line the riverbanks by the Tower of London. And there, just around the bend, comes the tallest, leanest ship of them all: the Pride of Baltimore II, sails unfurled and cannons booming."On this ship you sail into town, show what you've got, and then, take it all down and go boast about it," said the Pride II's captain, Jan Miles of Fells Point.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | July 24, 1993
When the auctioneer's hammer bangs down on Lot No. 1 Monday afternoon, a tiny, shiny piece of Maryland history will have a new home.The Lord Baltimore sixpence was struck at the Royal Mint in the Tower of London in the winter of 1658-1659 for circulation in the Calvert family's American colony.Few examples of Lord Baltimore's coinage survive, and the silver coin is expected to fetch at least $5,000 at the 1 p.m. auction by the Superior Galleries of Beverly Hills at the Omni Inner Harbor Hotel.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | February 18, 1991
Clyde Collins Snow, the forensic scientist who identified the remains of the Nazi "Angel of Death," Joseph Mengele, has agreed to help Maryland archaeologists plan a study of the remains in three lead coffins found during excavations last fall in St. Mary's City.The coffins, found within the ruins of the Great Brick Chapel at Maryland's first Colonial capital, are believed to be what's left of the crypt of the Calverts, Maryland's founding family.Snow, the author of "Witnesses from the Grave: The Stories Bones Tell," is to serve on a committee of scientists that will meet in March to discuss methods of studying and identifying the remains.
EXPLORE
SPECIAL TO THE AEGIS | June 25, 2012
Boy Scouts from around the Baltimore area gathered in Annapolis last week to witness a historic event involving the state's transfer of ownership to part of the Broad Creek Memorial Scout Reservation in northern Harford County. At a Board of Public Works meeting in the Governor's Reception Room in the State House, under a portrait of George Calvert, the first Lord Baltimore, Gov. Martin O'Malley signed an actual sheepskin land patent, granting 19.014 acres of previously state-owned land at Broad Creek to the Baltimore Area Council, Boy Scouts of America.
NEWS
By GREG GARLAND and GREG GARLAND,SUN REPORTER | January 17, 2006
Six people died in four separate traffic accidents over the holiday weekend in Baltimore and in Cecil, Calvert and Dorchester counties, authorities reported yesterday. Two people were killed and four others were injured in the city accident, which occurred about 2:30 a.m. Sunday at East Cold Spring Lane and St. Georges Avenue in North Baltimore. Killed were Wanda Holt, 48, of the 600 block of McCabe Ave. and her son, Ronnell Holt, whose age and address were unavailable, said Agent Donny Moses, a police spokesman.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | December 5, 1990
ST. MARY'S CITY -- Having discovered what they believe is the 300-year-old crypt of Maryland's founding Calvert family, archaeologists here are now beginning to puzzle over what to do with the three lead coffins found in the grave.A key question, they say, is whether the sealed coffins should be opened."We really don't know yet what we're going to do," said Henry Miller, chief archaeologist for Historic St. Mary's City.The lost crypt was rediscovered during a week-long excavation in what was once the north arm of the 323-year-old Great Brick Chapel in St. Mary's City.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | December 4, 1990
ST. MARY'S CITY -- Archaeologists digging in a meadow here said today they have uncovered what they believe is the crypt of Maryland's founding family, the Calverts, beneath the ruins of the 300-year-old Great Brick Chapel.A week of digging in what had been the north arm of the cross-shaped church ended today in the discovery of not one, but three, gray lead coffins.The coffins, bowed by the weight of the earth above them, lay side by side in a pit 3 feet deep and about 5 feet square.Henry Miller, chief archaeologist for Historic St. Mary's City, said the prestigious location of the crypt within the chapel and the cost and rarity of lead coffins in the 1600s led him to conclude that the coffins belong to Maryland's founding family.
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