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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | March 19, 2012
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention launched an ad campaign to show the damage done from smoking to smokers and their families. The ads began March 19 on television, radio, online and billboards, as well as in theaters, magazines and newspapers nationwide. Called “Tips from Smokers,” the campaign will show former smokers living with diseases and disabilities. Specifically, the smokers suffer from lung and throat cancer, heart attacks, strokes and other diseases.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
Officials at two Washington, D.C.-area hospitals said Friday they had isolated patients over fears of Ebola after the nation's first case of the deadly virus was confirmed in Dallas this week. But officials at one of the hospitals, Shady Grove Adventist Hospital in Rockville, determined late Friday that their patient had malaria, not Ebola, hospital officials said in a statement late Friday. Howard University Hospital quarantined a patient who had recently traveled to Nigeria out of "an abundance of caution," officials said.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | July 19, 2012
Women continue to mix cocktails and pregnancy despite the dangers it can pose to unborn babies. New government data found that 7.6 percent of women drank while pregnant and 1.4 percent of those moms binged on alcochol and beer. Binge drinking involves four or more drinks on one occasion. The Centers for Disease Control and Preventiion used data from a telephone survey of more than 345,000 women aged 18 to 44 to come up with its analysis. Of those, 13,880, or 4 percent, were pregnant.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
As an unusual strain of virus continues its march across the country — showing up most recently in Pennsylvania and Virginia — health officials in Maryland are warning doctors to be on the lookout and advising parents to prepare. Enterovirus is common, with millions in the United States sickened every year, most with mild cases. But the relatively rare strain called EV-D68 can cause severe respiratory illness in children with asthma or other health conditions, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warns.
HEALTH
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2012
The number of young children deemed at risk of lead poisoning in Maryland and nationwide expanded drastically Wednesday as a federal health agency declared it would effectively cut in half its threshold for diagnosing the environmental illness. Acknowledging mounting evidence that children can suffer lasting harm from ingesting even minute amounts of lead, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said it would reduce the level at which it recommends that doctors, families and health authorities act to lower a child's exposure to the toxic metal.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2012
Maryland will get $12.5 million from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to fund HIV prevention activities in the counties this year, down about $604,000 from last year, according to state health officials. The money comes from a $339 million pot of money doled out to states and a small number of cities according to their disease burden. And while Maryland's HIV caseload remains high, the grant dropped some because a share of the money was peeled off so the CDC could offer additional grants for innovative projects, which will be awarded in March.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention wants the American public to understand that HIV-positive people who receive treatment live longer and healthier lives compared to those who don't receive treatment, and has launched a new nationwide campaign to get the word out. The "HIV Treatment Works" campaign, announced Wednesday, is the CDC's "first communication campaign focused exclusively on encouraging treatment and care for people living with...
HEALTH
December 1, 2009
The current wave of pandemic H1N1 flu appears to have peaked, with four weeks of declines in several key indicators, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Monday. Despite those declines, the outbreak is continuing to take a heavy toll of hospitalizations and deaths, especially among children. Widespread activity of swine flu was reported in 32 states in the week ending Nov. 21, down from 43 states in the week before and 48 a month ago. Between Aug. 30 and Nov. 21, there were 29,348 laboratory-confirmed swine flu hospitalizations and 1,224 deaths in the United States, although those numbers are generally assumed to be very low. New figures are expected in a couple of weeks, but two weeks ago the CDC estimated that at least 4,000 people had died from swine flu, 98,000 had been hospitalized and 22 million had contracted the virus.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 9, 2005
LOS ANGELES -- Men undertaking risky homosexual activity are fueling a sharp increase in the incidence of syphilis and a smaller but concerning rise in gonorrhea resistant to commonly used antibiotics, federal researchers said yesterday. Those increases come at a time when venereal disease rates among historically important risk groups, especially women and minorities, have been declining, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. San Francisco, as in previous years, had the highest incidence of syphilis, with a rate of 45.9 cases per 100,000 people.
NEWS
By Donna Leinwand and Donna Leinwand,Knight-Ridder News Service | January 17, 1991
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. -- Infection-control techniques used by a Florida dentist did not measure up to national Centers for Disease Control standards and may have led to AIDS infections in three of his patients, according to the final draft of a CDC report to be published tomorrow.Genetic tests "strongly suggest" that Dr. David Acer somehow infected three of his patients, including Kimberly Bergalis, 22, who is suing her insurance provider for sending her to Dr. Acer, Ms. Bergalis' lawyers said.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention wants the American public to understand that HIV-positive people who receive treatment live longer and healthier lives compared to those who don't receive treatment, and has launched a new nationwide campaign to get the word out. The "HIV Treatment Works" campaign, announced Wednesday, is the CDC's "first communication campaign focused exclusively on encouraging treatment and care for people living with...
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | July 10, 2014
Excessive drinking accounts for 10 percent of deaths among working-age adults, making it the leading cause of preventable death of Americans, according to new research from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention . The alcohol use killed about 88,000 people aged 20 to 64 a year from 2006 to 2010, shortening their lives by about 30 years. They died from health effects including breast cancer, liver disease and heart disease, as well as from violence, alcohol poisoning and car crashes.
NEWS
Christian John Lillis | June 2, 2014
Anyone who has lost a loved one has experienced the five stages of grief: denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance. Following my mother's death from one such infection, Clostridium difficile, or C. diff., in April 2010, I went through the stages also. In making the shift from depression to acceptance, my brother and I founded the Peggy Lillis Memorial Foundation to raise awareness of C. diff. In our anger at learning that a disease we'd never heard of, not only claimed our mother, but also kills more than 28,000 Americans every year, we committed to ensuring that her death would not be in vain.
NEWS
By Sean Welsh, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2014
Complaints about stomach aches in Harford County might turn out to be more than a series of bellyaching. The Harford County Health Department and the Maryland Department of Health & Mental Hygiene are investigating an outbreak of stomach issues, a spokesman said Sunday night. "I can confirm a collaborative investigation between ourselves and the Maryland Department of Health & Mental Hygiene of what we believe at this time to be a restaurant-associated outbreak of gastroenteritis," said Harford County Health Department spokesman William Wiseman.
NEWS
By Ruth Ann Norton | October 30, 2013
What if there was a completely preventable disease that affected one in 38 American children under the age of six and Congress effectively eliminated the funding that supports efforts to eradicate the cause of the disease? There is such a disease - lead poisoning - and Congress did slash funding for lead poisoning prevention at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the most recent federal budget. Every year more than half a million children are poisoned by lead in their homes, leaving them with irreversible brain damage that will affect them for the rest of their lives.
NEWS
August 14, 2013
As The Sun recently noted, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued a report explaining that obesity rates in the nation have declined ("Tide may be turning on U.S. childhood obesity - CDC," Aug. 6). Hooray! But if you look beneath that shiny veneer here in Maryland, you'll find that the glass is really half full. It's true that our state's obesity rate in low-income preschoolers, after decades of rising, began to level off from 2003 through 2008 and is now showing small declines.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and By Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | July 16, 1991
The state medical society says it will move forward slowly to take on a leadership role to implement federal guidelines that yesterday urged doctors who perform "invasive" procedures and dentists who pull teeth and do root canals to quit if they become infected by the AIDS virus."
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | March 13, 2005
MIAMI HEAT superstar Shaquille O'Neal has a legitimate gripe, and for once it's not about Kobe Bryant. Shaq is a big, big guy, but he was a little taken aback when he found out the other day that he was rated as "obese" in a weight analysis of NBA players that was based on a formula promoted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The CDC uses something called the Body Mass Index (BMI) to assess the risk of weight-related diseases by placing individuals into one of four categories, which are determined by a calculation of height and weight.
EXPLORE
Editorial from The Aegis | May 14, 2013
With some exceptions, any illness can strike anyone at any time. One of the more dangerous to emerge in recent decades is Lyme disease. Harford County, as many of us know either first-hand or because of someone we know, is not immune from the tick-borne disease. The revelation last week that Harford County Council President Billy Boniface has contracted the sickness is yet another reminder. Lyme disease is treatable, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, but it can also be debilitating.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | April 2, 2013
One in 5 of teen births are from young moms who already have children, new CDC data shows. The Centers for Disease Control said Tuesday that although teen births have declined in the last two decades, one problem that remains is girls who get pregnant multiple times. There are about 183 "repeat teen births" each day, the CDC found. It is the second birth for 86 percent of the girls and the third birth for 13 percent of the moms. Teens with more than one child may find it difficult to finish school and get a good job. The babies are also often born premature.
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