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ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison | April 8, 2004
When my five-disc Panasonic stereo died last summer, I felt as if I had lost a cool cousin. That silver box had been with me since my sophomore year of college; it almost got me thrown out of my dorm room with its full sound. When I graduated, moved to Philly and had yet to make any new friends, I'd spend my evenings sprawled out on the living room floor as the stereo shuffled my favorite CDs. Oh, how I loved Pani. The evening she passed away was probably the only time my apartment has ever been music-less.
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BUSINESS
by Dana Amihere | April 17, 2013
CD players are going the way of the ashtray, roll-down windows and whitewall tires. Chevrolet is the latest to join the ranks of automakers like Ford who have ditched physical media players in favor of music streamed through onboard systems and auxillary music devices like smartphones and iPods. While reasons for the change are speculative and varied, many industry experts agree that the CD player is literally dead weight. Weighing in at about five pounds, manufacturers are looking for any way they can to slim down autos' bodies in favor of maximum fuel efficiency.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 12, 2001
I recently purchased a CD-R/RW unit. I backed up all my data and files to CDs and then started playing around. One feature that I really liked was the ability to record my favorite songs from various CDs to a single CD. This was great so long as I played the CD through the computer. When I tried to play the CD on our separate CD player, it would not recognize any track past 20. A check of our music CDs showed that 10 percent or less of the CD was ever recorded. This seems like a terrible waste of CD space as well as a rip-off.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison | April 8, 2004
When my five-disc Panasonic stereo died last summer, I felt as if I had lost a cool cousin. That silver box had been with me since my sophomore year of college; it almost got me thrown out of my dorm room with its full sound. When I graduated, moved to Philly and had yet to make any new friends, I'd spend my evenings sprawled out on the living room floor as the stereo shuffled my favorite CDs. Oh, how I loved Pani. The evening she passed away was probably the only time my apartment has ever been music-less.
NEWS
March 21, 1996
Police logLong Reach: 8700 block of Cloudleap Court: A burglar ransacked a home Tuesday after prying open a door and stole cash, a computer, a VCR and a CD player.
NEWS
December 17, 1993
POLICE LOG* Kings Contrivance: 7300 block of Narrow Wind Way: Two compact disk players and several CDs were stolen from a gray 1992 Toyota 4Runner Sunday night or Monday morning.* Long Reach: 8600 block of Open Meadow Way: Jewelry, a videocassette recorder, a CD player and other items were stolen from a home after someone kicked in a basement window Monday night.
NEWS
December 12, 1994
POLICE LOG* North Laurel: 9900 block of Whiskey Run Road: Vandals sprayed the footbridge and sidewalk near a residential area Thursday, police said.* Scaggsville: 8200 block of Mary Lee Lane: A CD player and two amplifiers valued at $2,000 were stolen from a 1986 Honda Civic, police said.
NEWS
December 30, 1992
POLICE LOG* Harper's Choice: 11200 block of Slalom Lane: A $289 Panasonic portable CD player and $68 worth of CD's were stolen from a 1992 Toyota Corolla about 10 a.m. Dec. 24.* Town Center: 10200 block of Wincopin Circle: Someone entered a 1988 Saab Dec. 24, and stole a Minolta 35mm camera, an Olympus 35mm camera, a Minolta VCR, a radar detector, a telephone, a tripod and a black briefcase.10300 block of Little Patuxent Parkway: A Maryland vehicle tag was stolen from a 1990 Ford Probe between 5 p.m. and 8 p.m. Dec. 18.* Wilde Lake: 5300 block of Brook Way: Someone broke the rear passenger window of a 1984 Toyota Corolla between 11 p.m. Dec. 21 and 7:30 a.m. Dec. 22, and stole a $188.
FEATURES
By Mark P. Couch and Mark P. Couch,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 17, 1997
George Jetson meets Julia Child with the Kitchen Coach, a video compact disc player that provides step-by-step cooking instructions to aspiring chefs.The Kitchen Coach is a CD player that Phillips Electronics designed to sit on the kitchen counter.The machine, which also works as a television set and as an audio CD player, is designed to play gourmet-cooking instructional CD-ROMs on its video screen.The $500 machine includes six video CDs that teach people how to prepare gourmet meals. Additional cooking discs are available.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Knight Ridder/Tribune | April 27, 1998
George Jetson meets Julia Child with the Kitchen Coach, a video compact disc player that provides step-by-step cooking instructions to aspiring chefs.The Kitchen Coach is a CD player that Phillips Electronics designed to sit on the kitchen counter.The machine, which also works as a television set and as an audio CD player, is designed to play gourmet-cooking instructional CD-ROMs on its video screen.The $500 gadget includes six video CDs that teach people how to prepare gourmet meals. Additional cooking discs are available.
ENTERTAINMENT
By D. Christopher Garrett | July 3, 2003
Skip Doctor heals your scratched CDs for smoother sound I'd heard it all about miracle-working products that could repair damaged compact discs. I'd squeeze bottles of the latest gunk onto a scratch-laden disc, buff it with a cloth and test the results - only to hear skips remain on my favorite songs. So, when an editor placed a boxed Skip Doctor ($49 for the motorized version; a hand-crank version is $29.99) on my desk for a moment, I asked if I could try it - figuring the device was worth a shot.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dawn C. Chmielewski and Dawn C. Chmielewski,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 23, 2003
The ailing music industry is poised to make a new push to copy-proof its music CDs, in hopes of slowing the raging epidemic of Internet piracy. Microsoft and Macrovision each announced new copy-protection initiatives at Midem, the record industry's biggest international conference, which ends today in Cannes, France. The new versions of locked-down discs are intended to strike a better balance between the labels' desire to keep their songs off unauthorized file-swapping services like Kazaa and consumers' expectations of flexibility and portability.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Thai Jones and Thai Jones,COLUMBIA NEWS SERVICE | April 18, 2002
You're driving from Shire Oaks, Pa., to Misty Mountain, Ark. You have two screaming hobbits in the back seat to appease and the road goes on and on. How do you survive the epic journey? In these dark times, there are but three main options for a keeper of hobbits: purchase J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings trilogy in paperback for $21 and read the 1,630 pages aloud; buy the unabridged audio edition on about 50 compact discs or cassettes ($105 for CDs, $75 for tapes), or stay home.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2002
Logitech model expands cordless possibilities at home Logitech has expanded its cordless approach to the telephone - at least as far as the PC is concerned. The Cordless Telephone and PC Headset System ($75) enables you to chat on the telephone, then switch to PC voice chat, then, if you want, use your speech recognition program on your computer. Three components make up the Logitech telephone: the base station, a remote that clips to your belt and the headset. Installation takes only a few moments.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | February 4, 2002
THIS IS THE story of a girl's first car, a story that should be uplifting and inspirational but instead has the kind of ending that leaves you shaking your head. It begins with a girl named Nicole Kleim. She's 16, a junior at Loch Raven High, a good kid who gets straight A's on her report card and works after school each day at Oak Crest Village retirement community to make a few bucks. A few months before her 16th birthday last November, she got her first car, a 1998 Jeep Wrangler. She paid for a big chunk of it out of her savings.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | January 10, 2002
Last month Erik Fredricks unwrapped a copy of More Fast and Furious, a new soundtrack from the movie The Fast and the Furious, and popped the CD into his boombox. This is what he heard: Silence. The disc, he said, "just spun and spun." Nor did he hear anything in his Sony PlayStation 2, one of the video game consoles that doubles as a CD player. Ditto for his two home computers, on which Fredricks, a 29-year-old furniture store manager in Acworth, Ga., prefers to listen to his music collection.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael E. Kanell and Michael E. Kanell,COX NEWS SERVICE | July 6, 1998
It's not so much trouble to reach for the stack of compact discs, pick the one you suddenly have a hankering for, pop it into the CD player and hit play. But wouldn't it be nice to just tap the CD player and have that tune start playing?You can, if you have every single CD you own sitting in the CD player. And you can have that if you have the cash to buy one of the new Kenwood 200-disc CD mega-changers.One of the key advantages CD technology has over tapes and records is random access - the ability to play the track you want without first listening to a bunch of other stuff.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 12, 2001
For the best portable MP3 music, using a Windows PC, should I go with the Nomad Jukebox 6G or wait for a PC version of iPod? Maybe I can save you a couple hundred bucks by suggesting an alternative to those elegant devices you are eyeing in the wake of Apple's widely covered introduction of the iPod music player. I would suggest that you might be looking at the wrong strategy for using computer-generated music files for portable listening by focusing on either Creative Labs' Nomad for Windows or Apple's sleek new iPod.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 12, 2001
I recently purchased a CD-R/RW unit. I backed up all my data and files to CDs and then started playing around. One feature that I really liked was the ability to record my favorite songs from various CDs to a single CD. This was great so long as I played the CD through the computer. When I tried to play the CD on our separate CD player, it would not recognize any track past 20. A check of our music CDs showed that 10 percent or less of the CD was ever recorded. This seems like a terrible waste of CD space as well as a rip-off.
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