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By New York Times News Service | September 18, 2008
WASHINGTON - Despite an effort to distance himself from the way his party has done business in Washington, Sen. John McCain is seen by voters as less likely to bring change to Washington than Sen. Barack Obama. McCain is widely viewed as a "typical Republican" who would continue or expand President Bush's policies, according to the latest New York Times/CBS News Poll. Polls taken after the Republican National Convention suggested that McCain had enjoyed a surge of support - particularly among white women after his selection of Gov. Sarah Palin of Alaska as his running mate - but the latest poll indicates "the Palin effect" was, at least so far, a limited burst of interest.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 18, 2008
WASHINGTON - Despite an effort to distance himself from the way his party has done business in Washington, Sen. John McCain is seen by voters as less likely to bring change to Washington than Sen. Barack Obama. McCain is widely viewed as a "typical Republican" who would continue or expand President Bush's policies, according to the latest New York Times/CBS News Poll. Polls taken after the Republican National Convention suggested that McCain had enjoyed a surge of support - particularly among white women after his selection of Gov. Sarah Palin of Alaska as his running mate - but the latest poll indicates "the Palin effect" was, at least so far, a limited burst of interest.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 15, 2003
Americans overwhelmingly consider the war in Iraq a success, and a majority say the victory will stand even if Saddam Hussein remains at large or if the United States fails to unearth chemical or nuclear weapons, according to the latest New York Times/CBS News Poll. But a majority remains opposed to a policy of pre-emptive attack like the one President Bush invoked in invading Iraq, and see the White House, emboldened by its success, as now likely to turn the nation's military might on North Korea, Syria or Iran.
NEWS
By Gwyneth K. Shaw and Gail Gibson and Gwyneth K. Shaw and Gail Gibson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 27, 2005
WASHINGTON - After rushing headlong into the emotional fray over the life of a brain-damaged Florida woman just a week ago, political leaders reacted to the apparent end of the wrenching saga with another near-unanimous position - silence. For Republicans who led the frenzied effort to help prolong the life of Terri Schiavo, there was good reason by week's end to quietly pull back. Their actions had been slapped down by the courts and scorned by the public, and new opinion polls showed slipping approval rates for Congress and the president.
NEWS
January 27, 1998
Lewinsky faked letter for college friend, paper saysPORTLAND, Ore. -- While attending Lewis & Clark College in Oregon, Monica Lewinsky allegedly used school stationery to write a phony letter to help someone she knew continue receiving unemployment benefits, the Oregonian reported Sunday, quoting an unidentified source.A college spokeswoman, Jean Kempe-Ware, said the school encouraged an employee who kept a copy of the document to turn it over to the Whitewater prosecutor, Kenneth W. Starr.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 21, 2000
Voter attitudes toward Rick A. Lazio have turned markedly more negative since June, with suburban women now moving solidly toward Hillary Rodham Clinton and many New Yorkers saying Lazio came across as harsh and inexperienced in his debate with Clinton last week, according to the latest New York Times/CBS News poll. The survey, which began Sept. 14 and was completed Tuesday night, suggested deterioration in Lazio's standing at the time that most politicians believe that voters are beginning serious consideration of the choice before them in the race for Senate.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 10, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Supreme Court nominee Judge Clarence Thomas enjoys about equal support, and opposition, from whites and blacks, but two-thirds of the American people have no opinion on whether he should be confirmed, the latest New York Times/CBS News Poll shows.Among those with a view, twice as many say he should be confirmed as say he should be rejected.Judge Thomas, who is black and has been opposed by most civil rights organizations, was supported by 23 percent of blacks and opposed by 15 percent.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 26, 1992
President Bush's gains from the Republican National Convention have almost completely evaporated, as four days in the spotlight failed to establish his commitment to change or his ideas for ending the recession, the latest New York Times/CBS News Poll shows.Gov. Bill Clinton of Arkansas re-established a strong lead, holding a 51 percent to 36 percent edge in the poll taken Sunday and Monday, or about the same margin he held before last week's convention.The poll showed the public had far more interest in hearing about his favorite issues, the economy and health care, than in topics featured at the convention, such as family values and homosexuality.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 19, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Ross Perot took to his favorite forum yesterday, talk television, with a new twist to his on-again, off-again designs on the White House.The Texas businessman said he might want to run for president, but not because he actually wants to be president. Instead, he said, re-entering the race would make it easier to buy television time from the networks for commercials pushing his prescription for the ailing economy."Interestingly enough, I'm trapped," Mr. Perot said on NBC's "Today" program.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 27, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- With both legal and illegal immigration into the United States approaching historic highs, a public reaction against immigration is also growing, the latest New York Times/CBS News Poll shows.After decades of heavy immigration that has included large numbers of Hispanic laborers and Southeast Asian refugees, and at a time when many Americans are out of work, a large majority of Americans surveyed said they favored a decrease in immigration. Many cited the economy as a factor in their opinion.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 29, 2004
Support for the war in Iraq has eroded substantially over the past several months, and Americans are increasingly critical of the way President Bush is handling the conflict, according to the latest New York Times/CBS News poll. After initially expressing robust backing for the war, the public is now evenly divided over whether the U.S. military should stay for as long as it takes to stabilize Iraq or pull out as soon as possible, the poll showed. Asked whether the United States had done the right thing in taking military action against Iraq, 47 percent of respondents said it had, down from 58 percent a month earlier and 63 percent in December, just after U.S. forces captured Saddam Hussein.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 15, 2003
Americans overwhelmingly consider the war in Iraq a success, and a majority say the victory will stand even if Saddam Hussein remains at large or if the United States fails to unearth chemical or nuclear weapons, according to the latest New York Times/CBS News Poll. But a majority remains opposed to a policy of pre-emptive attack like the one President Bush invoked in invading Iraq, and see the White House, emboldened by its success, as now likely to turn the nation's military might on North Korea, Syria or Iran.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 21, 2000
Voter attitudes toward Rick A. Lazio have turned markedly more negative since June, with suburban women now moving solidly toward Hillary Rodham Clinton and many New Yorkers saying Lazio came across as harsh and inexperienced in his debate with Clinton last week, according to the latest New York Times/CBS News poll. The survey, which began Sept. 14 and was completed Tuesday night, suggested deterioration in Lazio's standing at the time that most politicians believe that voters are beginning serious consideration of the choice before them in the race for Senate.
NEWS
January 27, 1998
Lewinsky faked letter for college friend, paper saysPORTLAND, Ore. -- While attending Lewis & Clark College in Oregon, Monica Lewinsky allegedly used school stationery to write a phony letter to help someone she knew continue receiving unemployment benefits, the Oregonian reported Sunday, quoting an unidentified source.A college spokeswoman, Jean Kempe-Ware, said the school encouraged an employee who kept a copy of the document to turn it over to the Whitewater prosecutor, Kenneth W. Starr.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 16, 1998
Twenty-five years and nearly 30 million abortions after the Supreme Court's landmark Roe vs. Wade decision, the American public still largely supports legalized abortion but says it should be harder to get and less readily chosen, the latest New York Times/CBS News Poll shows.The country remains irreconcilably split over what many consider the most divisive American issue since slavery, with half the population considering abortion murder, the poll found.Despite a quarter-century of lobbying, debating and protesting by the camps that call themselves "pro-choice" and "pro-life," that schism has remained virtually unaltered.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | June 6, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole, according to a Gallup Poll for USA Today and CNN, is the 1996 Republican presidential choice of 51 percent of voters surveyed.That puts him miles ahead of Sen. Phil Gramm (with 12 percent) and the seven other declared or near-declared rivals for the GOP nomination. Other national polls indicate about the same.So why is a small army of reporters poised to troop up to New Hampshire next weekend with declared non-candidate House Speaker Newt Gingrich?
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 29, 1993
NEW YORK -- President Clinton's decision to attack Iraq has brought him a substantial boost in approval ratings for handling both foreign policy and his overall job as president and has diminished uncertainty over his leadership on the world stage, according to the latest New York Times/CBS News Poll.The poll found that two-thirds of Americans surveyed supported the weekend air strike on the Iraqi intelligence headquarters in Baghdad, and six out of 10 approved of Mr. Clinton's general dealings with Iraq, more than approved of Mr. Clinton's handling of the crises in Bosnia-Herzegovina and Somalia.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 16, 1998
Twenty-five years and nearly 30 million abortions after the Supreme Court's landmark Roe vs. Wade decision, the American public still largely supports legalized abortion but says it should be harder to get and less readily chosen, the latest New York Times/CBS News Poll shows.The country remains irreconcilably split over what many consider the most divisive American issue since slavery, with half the population considering abortion murder, the poll found.Despite a quarter-century of lobbying, debating and protesting by the camps that call themselves "pro-choice" and "pro-life," that schism has remained virtually unaltered.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | April 5, 1995
WASHINGTON -- As Speaker Newt Gingrich & Co. drive toward the end of the 100 days in which they've pledged to get House action on their "Contract with America," they diligently strive for the impression that they are merely riding on a great wave of voter support for their objectives.But only a few weeks ago, a New York Times/CBS News poll reported that most voters surveyed disagreed with some basic tenets of the contract. They favored, for example, putting a higher premium on reducing the deficit than on cutting taxes, TC centerpiece of the document.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | July 12, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Only four months before Congress is expected to vote on the sweeping package of economic changes known as the North American Free Trade Agreement, a New York Times/CBS News poll finds that nearly half of Americans say they have not heard anything about the agreement.Although President Clinton has often spoken of the consumer benefits of global trade, as he did repeatedly in Tokyo last week, FTC the White House seems to be letting others set the agenda for the national debate on the North American pact.
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