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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 9, 1998
It was billed as a typical Caribbean cruise for the moderately well-to-do: dancing in the discotheque, lounging by the pool, volleyball games on deck, and stops for shopping and scuba diving at four tropical ports.The only difference was that most of the 900 scheduled passengers on the cruise chartered by a West Hollywood, Calif., travel agency are gay men.And the government of one destination, Grand Cayman, doesn't want them spending seven daytime hours on its streets and coral sand beaches.
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HEALTH
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2013
As lawmakers grilled Maryland's health secretary last week on why the state's troubled health exchange was still broken, the official in charge of it was on vacation in the Cayman Islands. Rebecca Pearce, executive director of the Maryland Health Benefit Exchange, took a seven-day trip to the Caribbean isle with her family and could not be reached by phone, email or text, officials confirmed Friday. She was away while lawmakers in Annapolis were pressing for answers on why the $70 million online insurance marketplace was beset by technical glitches two months after it launched and why enrollment continued to lag far behind other states.
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NEWS
By Gary Marx and Gary Marx,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 13, 2004
LA COLOMA, Cuba - Lugging food, clothing and other possessions, residents evacuated this coastal town yesterday as Cubans throughout the western part of the island braced for Hurricane Ivan, a powerful storm that has killed at least 65 people. Yet, while Ivan is expected this afternoon or evening to pound western Cuba, a rural area known for its tobacco production and tourist sites, the storm had veered west and was not likely to make what could have been a catastrophic strike on Havana, the nation's capital.
NEWS
March 15, 2012
Annie Linskey 's recent article regarding Maryland tax revenue estimates ("State reduces estimates of 2 years' tax receipts," March 8) failed to identify a major problem draining our state of revenue - corporate tax loopholes. When large corporations abuse loopholes and skirt paying the taxes they otherwise would owe, small and mid-sized businesses are forced to shoulder the burden of higher taxes or deal with a decline in the public infrastructure and services that help businesses thrive.
HEALTH
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2013
As lawmakers grilled Maryland's health secretary last week on why the state's troubled health exchange was still broken, the official in charge of it was on vacation in the Cayman Islands. Rebecca Pearce, executive director of the Maryland Health Benefit Exchange, took a seven-day trip to the Caribbean isle with her family and could not be reached by phone, email or text, officials confirmed Friday. She was away while lawmakers in Annapolis were pressing for answers on why the $70 million online insurance marketplace was beset by technical glitches two months after it launched and why enrollment continued to lag far behind other states.
NEWS
March 15, 2012
Annie Linskey 's recent article regarding Maryland tax revenue estimates ("State reduces estimates of 2 years' tax receipts," March 8) failed to identify a major problem draining our state of revenue - corporate tax loopholes. When large corporations abuse loopholes and skirt paying the taxes they otherwise would owe, small and mid-sized businesses are forced to shoulder the burden of higher taxes or deal with a decline in the public infrastructure and services that help businesses thrive.
NEWS
July 31, 1997
John Furze,55, a businessman who helped transform the Cayman Islands into a premier offshore banking center, died July 21 in George Town, Cayman Islands, of complications from heart surgery.Raymond "Jak" Jackson,70, the combative newspaper cartoonist known simply as "Jak" during more than 30 years of entertaining -- and occasionally outraging -- Londoners, died Sunday inLondon after surgery following a heart attack.Leo Loudenslager,53, who won the U.S. National Aerobatic Championships an unmatched seven consecutive times, died Monday in Nashville from injures he suffered in a June 28 motorcycle accident.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2011
Outfitted in scuba gear and 100 feet underwater, Cody Unser noticed a weird tingling in her legs. She dived a second and a third time, and again felt tingling. It was subtle, but it was the first new sensation that she had felt in three years, since becoming paralyzed from the chest down at age 12. "I couldn't believe I had gotten some feeling back," said Unser, daughter of Indianapolis 500 champ Al Unser Jr., now 24 and leading a foundation focusing on paralysis research and quality-of-life issues called The Cody Unser First Step Foundation.
NEWS
August 19, 1991
* Agnes: June 19-29, 1972; Florida to New York; 118 dead; $4.7 billion damage.* Fifi: Sept. 19-20, 1974; Honduras; 2,000 dead.Eloise: Sept. 13-27, 1975; Caribbean and northeastern United States; 71 dead.David: Aug. 30 to Sept. 13, 1979; Dominican Republic, Dominica and Florida, 1,200 dead. Frederic, Bahamas, Alabama and Mississippi; seven dead; $2.5 billion damage.* Allen: Aug. 4-11, 1980; Caribbean and Texas; 272 dead.* Juan: Oct. 26 to Nov. 6, 1985; Southeast U.S.; 97 dead.Gilbert: Sept.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2002
A man who flipped dozens of Baltimore houses, often using aliases, and then laundered hundreds of thousands of dollars in illicit profits through Cayman Islands bank accounts was sentenced yesterday to 64 months in federal prison. Scott Dunning Mead, 31, pleaded guilty in October to money laundering and conspiracy to commit arson and admitted that he had cheated mortgage lenders out of more than $1 million with his flipping scheme. The arson charge involved a Southwest Baltimore rowhouse that Mead arranged to have burned in hopes of collecting insurance after he learned that he could not flip it. As part of his plea deal, Mead helped the government recover $187,856.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2011
Outfitted in scuba gear and 100 feet underwater, Cody Unser noticed a weird tingling in her legs. She dived a second and a third time, and again felt tingling. It was subtle, but it was the first new sensation that she had felt in three years, since becoming paralyzed from the chest down at age 12. "I couldn't believe I had gotten some feeling back," said Unser, daughter of Indianapolis 500 champ Al Unser Jr., now 24 and leading a foundation focusing on paralysis research and quality-of-life issues called The Cody Unser First Step Foundation.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 12, 2010
Anna K. "Honey" Glebas, a retired Baltimore garment worker, died Tuesday of multiple organ failure at Stella Maris Hospice. She was 94. Anna Eva Kleinota, the daughter of immigrant tailors from Lithuania, was born in Baltimore and raised on South Paca Street. She was a graduate of Southern High School and had worked for more than 40 years as a seamstress for Stetson Dee and the Haas Tailoring Co. before retiring in 1973. She married Charles Glebas, a tailor, in 1934, and for many years the couple lived on Bateman Avenue in Windsor Hills.
NEWS
By Tribune Newspapers | February 16, 2010
DICK FRANCIS , 89 Best-selling British mystery writer Dick Francis, a champion steeplechase jockey who became a best-selling British mystery writer, died of natural causes Sunday at his home in the Cayman Islands. He wrote 42 novels, many featuring racing as a theme, after retiring from racing in 1957. "I haven't suffered the same injuries as my characters, but I have suffered pain and I know it," he told the Los Angeles Times during a visit to Southern California in 1981.
TRAVEL
June 22, 2008
The Caribbean in summer? It's a more appealing option than you might think, especially if you're looking for a bargain vacation this year. Here are a few reasons: 1. Prices are lower, with some hotels and resorts cutting as much as 60 percent off their winter rates. 2. Temperatures are typically only a few degrees higher than they are in the peak travel months of January through March. And they can be even lower than you'll find at popular beach spots back in the United States. 3. The threat of hurricanes is certainly real, but perhaps not as great as you might imagine.
NEWS
By Chris Kraul and Chris Kraul,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 20, 2007
CARACAS, Venezuela -- Immense and dangerous Hurricane Dean slammed into Jamaica's southern shore yesterday evening, ripping roofs from buildings, flattening trees and flooding coastal areas. Although there were no early reports of deaths, Prime Minister Portia Simpson Miller said she was "very concerned" about the storm's impact, especially about the eastern parish of St. Thomas, with which the national disaster preparedness office lost contact. The hurricane, the most powerful Caribbean storm this season, remained on a course that could take it to Mexico's busiest tourist zone, the Yucatan Peninsula, by late today or early tomorrow.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2006
All The King's Men Sean Penn is populist firebrand Willie Stark in this second big-screen adaptation of Robert Penn Warren's celebrated novel, about shady politics and other crooked dealings in Louisiana. The first adaptation won the 1948 Best Picture Oscar. Confetti In this British mockumentary, three couples try to win a contest for the Most Original Wedding of the Year. Feast In this final film from HBO's Project Greenlight series, bar patrons and grisly monsters have it out with one another.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | June 3, 1999
The Santa Maria Cup women's match racing championship got under way yesterday in shifty, 10- to 12-knot winds that challenged both the race committee and 12 top-flight crews."
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,SUN STAFF | September 27, 2001
A man under federal indictment for arson and mail fraud in an alleged property flipping scheme in Baltimore was charged yesterday with money laundering, and prosecutors say they expect him to plead guilty. Scott Dunning Mead, who moved to Montana from Maryland months before his indictment in June, laundered more than $300,000 from his flipping activities through a Cayman Islands bank, prosecutors alleged in a criminal information filed yesterday in U.S. District Court. Some money was sent back to the United States to finance Mead's real estate activities and to purchase a Montana condominium, the information said.
NEWS
By JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG and JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 18, 2005
MIAMI -- Forecasters reached the last name on this year's list when Tropical Storm Wilma, a likely future hurricane that could threaten the U.S. Gulf Coast, formed in the Caribbean yesterday. "This is the first time we've ever gotten 21 storms" in one season, said Mark McInerney, a meteorologist at the National Hurricane Center here. There were 21 tropical storms in 1933, McInerney said, but they weren't given names in those days. Because the letters Q, U, X, Y and Z aren't used, any other storms that form during the busy 2005 Atlantic season, which ends Nov. 30, will be given names from the Greek alphabet, starting with Alpha.
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