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Cayenne Pepper

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NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | May 27, 2001
Q. I have a home remedy to share with your readers. If you have a cut that's bleeding, put ground cayenne pepper on it. The bleeding will stop quickly. You can get cayenne at the grocery store. A.When we first heard that ground black pepper could stop bleeding, we were skeptical. Now that we have had several opportunities to use this home remedy ourselves, we can attest to its value. Yours is not the first letter to suggest that cayenne pepper can be used in a similar manner. To our surprise, black pepper does not sting when sprinkled on a minor cut. We don't know whether cayenne would be irritating.
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ENTERTAINMENT
Julie Rothman and For The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
Cara Kohler of Baltimore wanted the recipe for the delicious cheesy baked grits casserole served at a cookout over the summer. She said she had never enjoyed grits as much as she did these, and they seemed to be a hit with everyone at the party. Tracy Swindel , also of Baltimore, shared her go-to recipe for baked grits from "The Lady & Sons: Savannah Country Cookbook" by Paula Deen . Swindel said she frequently makes this dish for large gatherings because it can be made ahead of time and the recipe doubles well if you are feeding a crowd.
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NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | September 14, 2003
I was too lazy to put on jeans yesterday afternoon and went out to weed the garden in shorts. I had no insect repellent, so of course the mosquitoes ate me alive. I was in a hurry to finish the job, but the bites itched. I got some witch hazel for the itching and poured it all over my legs, then returned to the garden for half an hour. I was amazed: I could see the critters flitting around my legs, but not one lit and took a bite. I surely learned my lesson about preparation being worth the time.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,kate.shatzkin@baltsun.com | March 18, 2009
This simple fish dish comes from a new Weight Watchers cookbook that offers lean dinners in 20 minutes or less, and this recipe delivered. It also had the qualities that please my picky crowd at home: a pretty plain piece of fish, in this case, that one could dress up with a sauce or not. The catfish, on sale, also fit our budget. I was intrigued by the name, of course. The seasoning had a few of the elements of Old Bay Seasoning, including a dash of cayenne, which you can leave out if your kids are sensitive to spices.
NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | November 28, 1999
Liquid marinades made with citrus juice, vinegar or wine are marvelous for breaking down the muscle fiber in tougher cuts of meat and for adding flavor. But here's the rub: Delicate fish can disintegrate in acidic liquids, and naturally tender cuts of meat need only a flavor boost -- not tenderizing.A better technique for flavoring such foods is to treat them to a gentle massage with dried herbs and spices.By making your own herb-and-spice rubs, you can custom-mix blends for beef, pork, lamb or fish.
NEWS
October 4, 2006
Acorn Squash with Red Onion and Currants Serves 8 2 medium acorn squash 1/4 cup vegetable oil salt and freshly ground pepper 4 tablespoons ( 1/2 stick) unsalted butter 5 medium garlic cloves, thinly sliced 3 tablespoons sherry vinegar 2 medium red onions, thinly sliced 1 tablespoon paprika 2 pinches cayenne pepper 1/2 cup dried currants 1/3 cup honey 3 tablespoons red-wine vinegar Heat oven to 325 degrees. Wash the squash. Using a serrated knife, cut the squash in half and scoop out the seeds.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Clinton and Sherrie Clinton,Evening Sun Staff | June 12, 1991
Dennis Kincaid, of College Park, was Saturday's winner of the Maryland State Chili Competition at Oregon Ridge. There were 45 entries.The contest was sponsored by the Mason Dixon Chili Pod. For more chili information call 557-8549.Winning Chili2 tablespoons of bacon grease1 1/2 large onions, sliced4 fresh jalapeno peppers with seeds, chopped2 1/2 pounds bottom round beef, cut in 1/2 -inch cubes, with fat and grizzle removed2 pounds ground pork1 15-ounce can tomato sauce1 can beef bouillon2 large cloves garlic, chopped fine4 cans Ortega or Old El Paso long grain chilies, chopped2 tablespoons cumin, divided2 tablespoons cayenne pepper2 tablespoons hot chili powder6 tablespoons mild chili powder or Texas chili powderIn large kettle, melt bacon grease, add onions and chopped jalapeno peppers, cook until onions are soft.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 30, 2000
Q.We were glad to see your article about hot, spicy soup for headaches. My husband has been plagued with headaches from an early age. Using hot salsa with chips at the onset of a headache has definitely stopped two headaches! I am attempting to find capsaicin in another form. The health food store has cayenne pepper capsules that contain capsaicin. Do you think they would help? A.The people who have shared their experience with fast relief have used hot and spicy soups. Capsaicin gives hot peppers their kick, and we suspect this is responsible for the pain relief.
FEATURES
By Seattle Times | January 15, 1991
Nutritional breakdownMakes 4 servings. Each serving has:* Calories: 361* Protein: 31 grams* Carbohydrates: 42 grams* Fat: 8 grams* Saturated fat: 1 gram* Cholesterol: 56 milligrams* Sodium: 381 milligramsShopping list3 boneless and skinless chicken breast halves4 flour tortillas1 jalapeno pepper1 15-ounce can black beans1 large ripe tomato1 small bunch cilantro1 medium red onionFresh lime juice1/4 cup plain low-fat yogurtPantry: cayenne pepper, clove garlic,...
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,kate.shatzkin@baltsun.com | March 18, 2009
This simple fish dish comes from a new Weight Watchers cookbook that offers lean dinners in 20 minutes or less, and this recipe delivered. It also had the qualities that please my picky crowd at home: a pretty plain piece of fish, in this case, that one could dress up with a sauce or not. The catfish, on sale, also fit our budget. I was intrigued by the name, of course. The seasoning had a few of the elements of Old Bay Seasoning, including a dash of cayenne, which you can leave out if your kids are sensitive to spices.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | February 2, 2008
If my husband and I were to name our favorite cities, New Orleans would be right at the top of our list. Our ties to the Crescent City are deep. Growing up, we visited often because we had grandparents who lived nearby, then we spent our college years at Tulane and Newcomb. We have many fond memories of celebrating Mardi Gras on Bourbon Street, and now, many years later, we still check the calendar to find out when Fat Tuesday falls. I am planning to host a Mardi Gras party next week, and already have the menu chosen.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Reporter | July 4, 2007
The Fourth of July always startles us into the realization that summer is flying by faster than we'd like. Time to pick some blue crabs with good friends before everyone scatters for late-summer vacations and early-fall obligations. Chef Greg Hare, until recently a chef instructor at Baltimore International College, showed us how to steam Maryland's favorite catch in beer and cider vinegar. "It just adds more pizazz" than water, he says. Instead of Old Bay, he makes his own seafood seasoning mix. If you'd like to steam corn and potatoes in the same pot with the crabs, alternate layers of the vegetables with the layers of crabs, starting with the crabs.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | January 27, 2007
When good friends who live in Washington telephoned recently to say that they would be in town for several days, I immediately marked a date on the calendar when we could get together. Originally, I had thought that we might dine out, but while testing recipes this past week, I realized that a new dish I had been working on would make a perfect entree to serve four. That recipe was for sauteed scallops dusted in smoked paprika, served atop a mound of saffron and orange-scented couscous.
NEWS
October 4, 2006
Acorn Squash with Red Onion and Currants Serves 8 2 medium acorn squash 1/4 cup vegetable oil salt and freshly ground pepper 4 tablespoons ( 1/2 stick) unsalted butter 5 medium garlic cloves, thinly sliced 3 tablespoons sherry vinegar 2 medium red onions, thinly sliced 1 tablespoon paprika 2 pinches cayenne pepper 1/2 cup dried currants 1/3 cup honey 3 tablespoons red-wine vinegar Heat oven to 325 degrees. Wash the squash. Using a serrated knife, cut the squash in half and scoop out the seeds.
FEATURES
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | July 8, 2006
From the moment she first tasted the Roasted Eggplant and Tomato Salad I had prepared for a cooking class, my assistant was smitten. She loved the combination of colors -- the dark purple-hued eggplant paired with the bright red plum tomatoes. She liked the contrast of textures -- the softness of the roasted aubergine combined with the firmer plum tomatoes and the crunchy onions. But she was especially surprised by the unexpected spicy taste of the dressing, a mixture of lemon juice and robust seasonings of cumin, paprika and cayenne pepper.
FEATURES
By TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | May 13, 2006
On Mother's Days past, our son (assisted by his dad) liked to make breakfast for me. Following much clanging of pots and pans, I would be greeted by a smiling junior chef, proudly holding a tray loaded with breakfast. In those days, our child rarely ventured into the kitchen to cook. Mother's Day was the single exception. But now, a few decades later, he's a parent himself, and more than a little talented when it comes to cooking. In fact, he does most of the meal preparation for his young family, and loves celebrating special occasions with good food.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper,Staff Writer | March 1, 1992
All chili recipes are to be viewed with a mixture of reverence and suspicion. Reverence for the process of making mere meat take on extraordinary flavors, and suspicion of whether the ingredients listed are actually those the chili maker used.Bill Buchanan's version of Flameout Gonzales Chili1/2 pound fresh suet (or 2 to 3 tablespoons oil)6 pounds chuck or bottom round, chili grind2 pounds pork loin (or substitute 1 pound veal shanks or game bird breasts)2 large onions, finely diced6 cloves garlic, crushed2 green peppers plus 1 medium red pepper, quartered2 cans beef bouillon2 28-ounce cans tomato sauce1 28-ounce can tomatoes, chopped coarsely in blender12 tablespoons chili powder5 tablespoons ground cumin or 1 tablespoon paprika or 1 tablespoon sage4 tablespoons of flour (masa flour, which may be found in the ethnic sections of most supermarkets, is preferred.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | December 1, 2002
I used to experience violent migraine headaches until I started using feverfew on the advice of a friend. Are there any side effects I should know about? I would hate to stop, because feverfew has been a godsend for me. Feverfew is a wildflower that grows abundantly in the North-eastern United States. This herb was used by ancient Greek healers. Research has shown that feverfew helps reduce the severity and incidence of migraines. Side effects might include mouth ulcers, indigestion and increased heart rate.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | November 12, 2003
Felicity Pocock of Baltimore requested a recipe for an "oyster-artichoke soup, or stew, ... which was a standard at a restaurant in New Orleans." Michael Cheswick of Eldersburg responded. "From the Gumbo Shop in New Orleans, oyster-and-artichoke soup for Felicity in Baltimore. The Gumbo Shop on South Front Street is one of the best-kept secrets in New Orleans. During a week's stay, I must have eaten there three or four times. I have served the soup during Super Bowls and at Christmas. ... You can get the Gumbo Shop cookbook online.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | September 14, 2003
I was too lazy to put on jeans yesterday afternoon and went out to weed the garden in shorts. I had no insect repellent, so of course the mosquitoes ate me alive. I was in a hurry to finish the job, but the bites itched. I got some witch hazel for the itching and poured it all over my legs, then returned to the garden for half an hour. I was amazed: I could see the critters flitting around my legs, but not one lit and took a bite. I surely learned my lesson about preparation being worth the time.
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