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By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | September 20, 2000
Cawood Hadaway, an Eastern Shore teacher and wildlife artist, died Sunday of cancer at his Chestertown home. He was 58. An art teacher at Queen Anne's County High School in Centreville for 17 years, Mr. Hadaway retired in 1997. For the next two years, he taught art and coached tennis at Gunston Day School in Centreville. He carved decoys and sketched and painted Eastern shore wildlife. He instructed his students, often the children of farmers and watermen, to look for inspiration in the nearby fields and marshes as he did. Mr. Hadaway would wade through creeks and walk fields and thickets in an old pair of tennis shoes, looking for subjects to sketch and paint.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN REPORTER | April 18, 2007
James Clement Cawood Jr., a retired Anne Arundel County Circuit Court judge and attorney, died of a heart attack Sunday at Evergreen, his West River home. He was 70. Born in Washington, he was a 1954 graduate of St. Anselm's Abbey School and earned a bachelor's degree in history from Georgetown University in 1958. He then attended Georgetown Law School, where he met Katherine Brooke Kelly, whom he married in 1960. In the 1950s, he served as a Marine Corps Reserve staff sergeant and also covered high school sports for the old Washington Evening Star.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN REPORTER | April 18, 2007
James Clement Cawood Jr., a retired Anne Arundel County Circuit Court judge and attorney, died of a heart attack Sunday at Evergreen, his West River home. He was 70. Born in Washington, he was a 1954 graduate of St. Anselm's Abbey School and earned a bachelor's degree in history from Georgetown University in 1958. He then attended Georgetown Law School, where he met Katherine Brooke Kelly, whom he married in 1960. In the 1950s, he served as a Marine Corps Reserve staff sergeant and also covered high school sports for the old Washington Evening Star.
NEWS
By Kathy Bergren Smith and Kathy Bergren Smith,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 25, 2002
THE CALL to the hunt is sounded on a crisp fall morning, and the hounds and riders of the Marlborough Hunt Club are off. For the next several hours, a group of formally attired riders will jump fences, cross streams and circle fields, chasing the hounds that chase the fox. Although their black coats and shining boots may appear fancy, the riders must be nimble enough to keep up with one of the three groups. This is not a sport for the faint-hearted. "It is all a game. Here in America, we do not kill the fox, we are technically `fox chasing,'" says Katherine Cawood of West River, one of three hunt masters for the 125-member club.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | November 8, 2000
The odds were incredibly favorable. With no competitors to claim votes, two Anne Arundel County Circuit Court judges easily secured 15-year terms on the bench in yesterday's election. With about one-fifth of Arundel precincts reporting, James C. Cawood Jr. and Philip T. Caroom, who handle mostly domestic and administrative cases, were on their way to retaining their seats on the 10-judge court, the fifth-largest Circuit Court in the state. Cawood, 64, is the county judiciary's unofficial historian.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | October 21, 2001
His longtime position at the helm of the court's family division gone, Judge James C. Cawood Jr. will retire from the Anne Arundel County Circuit Court on Oct. 30. Cawood, 65, said he is stepping down after nearly two decades on the bench because he is unhappy with changes in the court that have taken family cases from him and that have set time limits for moving cases through the legal system. Cawood has handled cases of family discord -- seen by many judges as the worst cases because they tend to be emotional and take a great deal of time -- almost exclusively for most of his tenure on the bench.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2001
He's arranged seating for confirmations and weddings because warring parents couldn't agree on who would sit where. He's thrilled and disappointed thousands of adults in decisions on child custody and support. In nearly two decades on the bench, Judge James C. Cawood Jr. has presided over the dissolution of countless failed relationships, and he's patiently dealt with the couples who return to his courtroom year after year. "When a case comes in, everybody loves you. When they keep coming back, at least one of them doesn't love you," Cawood said with characteristically dry wit. At 65, Cawood, considered the grandfather of family law matters in the county and an expert in the field throughout the state, is leaving the Anne Arundel County Circuit Court bench.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2001
He's arranged seating for confirmations and weddings because warring parents couldn't agree on who would sit where. He's thrilled and disappointed thousands of adults in decisions on child custody and support. In nearly two decades on the bench, Judge James C. Cawood Jr. has presided over the dissolution of countless failed relationships, and he's patiently dealt with the couples who return to his courtroom year after year. "When a case comes in, everybody loves you. When they keep coming back, at least one of them doesn't love you," Cawood said with characteristically dry wit. At 65, Cawood, considered the grandfather of family law matters in the county and an expert in the field throughout the state, is leaving the Anne Arundel County Circuit Court bench.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff Writer | March 21, 1995
Eight people hung posters on the Anne Arundel County Circuit Courthouse fence yesterday and gathered signatures on a petition calling for passage of a law that would set up a Family Division within circuit courts to handle divorces and child custody disputes.Such issues are handled as part of Maryland's regular Circuit Court caseload.In three hours yesterday morning, the demonstrators gathered about 150 signatures on petitions asking the state House Judiciary and the Senate Judicial Proceedings committees to approve bills to set up a Family Division.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | January 29, 1993
A window screen lying on the sidewalk, or a pipe jutting out across a pathway, or sudsy water flowing out of a drainpipe and across the street in front of us, are things we hardly notice as we make our way on foot from place to place. We make the mental adjustment and step over or around, while most of our mind is concentrated elsewhere.Ah, but if we were blind! Then such things could be hazards to life and limb, as Gary Cawood teaches us in "Obstacles," one of his series of photographs on view at Goucher College.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | November 27, 2001
Twenty lawyers, including four lower court judges, will vie for the two imminent vacancies on the Anne Arundel County Circuit Court, according to the list of applicants released by the state courts last night. The large number of hopefuls for what might be the last Circuit Court appointments in the county made by Gov. Parris N. Glendening surprised some court observers, but others had anticipated a flood of applicants as many lawyers said in recent weeks that they were considering applying.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2001
He's arranged seating for confirmations and weddings because warring parents couldn't agree on who would sit where. He's thrilled and disappointed thousands of adults in decisions on child custody and support. In nearly two decades on the bench, Judge James C. Cawood Jr. has presided over the dissolution of countless failed relationships, and he's patiently dealt with the couples who return to his courtroom year after year. "When a case comes in, everybody loves you. When they keep coming back, at least one of them doesn't love you," Cawood said with characteristically dry wit. At 65, Cawood, considered the grandfather of family law matters in the county and an expert in the field throughout the state, is leaving the Anne Arundel County Circuit Court bench.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2001
He's arranged seating for confirmations and weddings because warring parents couldn't agree on who would sit where. He's thrilled and disappointed thousands of adults in decisions on child custody and support. In nearly two decades on the bench, Judge James C. Cawood Jr. has presided over the dissolution of countless failed relationships, and he's patiently dealt with the couples who return to his courtroom year after year. "When a case comes in, everybody loves you. When they keep coming back, at least one of them doesn't love you," Cawood said with characteristically dry wit. At 65, Cawood, considered the grandfather of family law matters in the county and an expert in the field throughout the state, is leaving the Anne Arundel County Circuit Court bench.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | October 21, 2001
His longtime position at the helm of the court's family division gone, Judge James C. Cawood Jr. will retire from the Anne Arundel County Circuit Court on Oct. 30. Cawood, 65, said he is stepping down after nearly two decades on the bench because he is unhappy with changes in the court that have taken family cases from him and that have set time limits for moving cases through the legal system. Cawood has handled cases of family discord -- seen by many judges as the worst cases because they tend to be emotional and take a great deal of time -- almost exclusively for most of his tenure on the bench.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | November 8, 2000
The odds were incredibly favorable. With no competitors to claim votes, two Anne Arundel County Circuit Court judges easily secured 15-year terms on the bench in yesterday's election. With about one-fifth of Arundel precincts reporting, James C. Cawood Jr. and Philip T. Caroom, who handle mostly domestic and administrative cases, were on their way to retaining their seats on the 10-judge court, the fifth-largest Circuit Court in the state. Cawood, 64, is the county judiciary's unofficial historian.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | September 20, 2000
Cawood Hadaway, an Eastern Shore teacher and wildlife artist, died Sunday of cancer at his Chestertown home. He was 58. An art teacher at Queen Anne's County High School in Centreville for 17 years, Mr. Hadaway retired in 1997. For the next two years, he taught art and coached tennis at Gunston Day School in Centreville. He carved decoys and sketched and painted Eastern shore wildlife. He instructed his students, often the children of farmers and watermen, to look for inspiration in the nearby fields and marshes as he did. Mr. Hadaway would wade through creeks and walk fields and thickets in an old pair of tennis shoes, looking for subjects to sketch and paint.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | December 24, 1997
The owner of a burned Annapolis building may not demolish the historic facade yet, an Anne Arundel County Circuit Court judge ruled yesterday, but the judge also recommended that city officials decide quickly whether the charred brick ruins should be saved.The injunction by Judge James C. Cawood Jr. delighted the Historic Annapolis Foundation. The nonprofit group sued to prevent Ronald B. Hollander from razing what is left of his 1899 building in the historic district before an evaluation and without approval from the Historic Preservation Commission.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | December 24, 1997
The owner of a burned Annapolis building may not demolish the historic facade yet, an Anne Arundel County circuit judge ruled yesterday, but the judge also recommended that city officials decide quickly whether the charred brick ruins ought to be saved.The injunction by Judge James C. Cawood Jr. delighted the Historic Annapolis Foundation. The nonprofit group sued to prevent Ronald B. Hollander from razing what is left of his 1899 building in the historic district before an evaluation and without approval from the Historic Preservation Commission.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | December 24, 1997
The owner of a burned Annapolis building may not demolish the historic facade yet, an Anne Arundel County Circuit Court judge ruled yesterday, but the judge also recommended that city officials decide quickly whether the charred brick ruins should be saved.The injunction by Judge James C. Cawood Jr. delighted the Historic Annapolis Foundation. The nonprofit group sued to prevent Ronald B. Hollander from razing what is left of his 1899 building in the historic district before an evaluation and without approval from the Historic Preservation Commission.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | December 24, 1997
The owner of a burned Annapolis building may not demolish the historic facade yet, an Anne Arundel County circuit judge ruled yesterday, but the judge also recommended that city officials decide quickly whether the charred brick ruins ought to be saved.The injunction by Judge James C. Cawood Jr. delighted the Historic Annapolis Foundation. The nonprofit group sued to prevent Ronald B. Hollander from razing what is left of his 1899 building in the historic district before an evaluation and without approval from the Historic Preservation Commission.
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