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By Susan Reimer | February 11, 1997
I WENT TO see Rob Becker's one-man show "Defending the Caveman" and left thinking that my husband should put Becker on retainer. No man is more in need of defending right now than my own personal caveman.That's because he and I had a date for that show and he stood me up. Scheduled an out-of-town business trip. On our anniversary.Is he Rob Becker's poster boy or what?I planned this evening of fine dining and theater -- women are always doing the planning -- because I felt like 14 years of marriage in the current national rush to divorce merits more celebration than saloon food and a movie at the local multi-plex cinema.
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By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2012
Welcome to the Year of the Meatball. I was going to predict it here first, but apparently other media have already predicted it. Still - meatballs. In other food items, a few restaurants around town are going on Janauary vacation. So civilized. Also, your new regimen might not be so smart. Your January liquor detox is a thoroughly futile exercise, as far as liver health goes, according to a British non-profit promoting liver health. You'd be much better off, liver-wise, simply not drinking so much the whole year round.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 9, 2001
"The Caveman's Valentine" is about a homeless man who cracks a murder case - not just any homeless man, and not just any murder case. Romulus Ledbetter, played by Samuel L. Jackson, elects to live in a cave in New York City's Inwood Park. The response he evokes isn't, "Oh, my God, that man is me!" - which is what you would expect from a heartfelt exploration of homelessness - but "Oh, my God, that man is greater than I could ever be!" Romulus is a Juilliard-trained pianist who experienced a crack-up a la "Shine" that left him paranoid and possessed of scattered, blazing insights.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN REPORTER | March 8, 2007
Throughout history, cavemen have often been portrayed as knuckle-dragging, club-wielding, fire-starting cavemen. But even a caveman can get a sitcom. The three cavemen in the Geico insurance ads will star in a comedy pilot for ABC. In the popular commercials, the prehistoric dudes act insulted over the running joke that "even a caveman can do it." The sitcom, if picked up for the fall season, will feature the cavemen handling "prejudice" as thirtysomethings living in modern-day Atlanta.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | February 3, 1997
The guys in junior high school came to rely upon Rob Becker to explain the great mystery of life: girls. They'd always see him walking to school with his buddy, Michelle, and her girlfriends. The girls, it turns out, had come to rely upon Becker to explain the great mystery of life: boys."I became the resident guy of the group," says Becker, writer and performer of "Defending the Caveman," a one-man show coming to the Lyric Opera House for eight performances tomorrow through Sunday."So they'd question me on the way to school, you know, 'Why would a guy say this to me?
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN REPORTER | March 8, 2007
Throughout history, cavemen have often been portrayed as knuckle-dragging, club-wielding, fire-starting cavemen. But even a caveman can get a sitcom. The three cavemen in the Geico insurance ads will star in a comedy pilot for ABC. In the popular commercials, the prehistoric dudes act insulted over the running joke that "even a caveman can do it." The sitcom, if picked up for the fall season, will feature the cavemen handling "prejudice" as thirtysomethings living in modern-day Atlanta.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | March 18, 1994
It's not what you'd call a powerhouse night of television, unless you're a college basketball fan. If so, and you're looking for hoops, there it is -- on CBS, for most of the afternoon and much of the evening. Otherwise, the evening's highlight is an episode of "The X-Files" -- one that was supposed to be last Friday's highlight.* "NCAA basketball tournament" (noon-5 p.m., 8 p.m.-conclusion, WBAL, Channel 11) -- Eight more hours of opening-round coverage, occupying most of the afternoon and all of CBS' prime time.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 19, 1996
Tonight offers the chance to see lots of people in roles from before they became famous, plus a reminder of why Baltimore dTC and New York can't seem to get along.* "The Cosby Show" (5 p.m.-5:30 p.m., WNUV, Channel 54) -- Stevie Wonder guest stars as the man whose limo dented Denise's (Lisa Bonet) fender. Rather than get angry, however, she can't believe her good fortune when Stevie invites all the Huxtables to a recording session.* "Seinfeld" (7:30 p.m.-8 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Lois Lane herself, Teri Hatcher, plays Jerry's new girlfriend.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | June 4, 2000
You know what you want. So stop shortchanging yourself with TV shows that can't give it to you, that don't know how to give it to you. You deserve to spend your time with a show that can hit your intellectual, emotional and other assorted buttons -- and all in 22 commercial-free minutes. So dump that "Jesse" chick already and tune in and turn on to HBO's eroti-comedy "Sex and the City." The third season premieres tonight at 9. Look for your shallow, sleazy one-night television stands elsewhere.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 6, 1997
The Lyric is a very big cave. A very, very big cave.Put one lone caveman on the stage of the Lyric Opera House, and he nearly gets swallowed up.At least that's what's happening with the one-man show, "Rob Becker's Defending the Caveman." Maybe if the sound system were better, maybe if Becker's diction were clearer -- so that "chip bowl" (I think it was "chip bowl") didn't sound like "Chippendales" and "her magic" like "hermitage" -- it would be possible to appreciate his riff on the war between the sexes.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,sun reporter | November 16, 2006
A 38,000-year-old bone fragment is opening doors to greater understanding of human origins by unraveling mysteries about one of our most enigmatic distant relatives: the Neanderthal. An international team of researchers is sequencing the Neanderthal genome using the half-ounce fragment from a male found in a Croatian cave. Already, it is giving up some secrets: Neanderthals and humans split from a common ancestor 500,000 years ago, and they didn't interbreed, at least on a large scale.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | March 18, 2003
ROB BECKER, the loveable lug of the one-man show Defending the Caveman, is heading back into his cave after more than a decade spent on tour helping men and women understand that they can't help the way they are: Anthropology is destiny. Becker will make his last stop in Baltimore from March 28 to 30 at the Lyric Opera House as part of a yearlong farewell tour. Then he will return to his wife, Erin, and three kids in Marin County, Calif., where he will polish the next act in his life: Defending the Cave Dad. "I wanted one more time around," says Becker.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 9, 2001
"The Caveman's Valentine" is about a homeless man who cracks a murder case - not just any homeless man, and not just any murder case. Romulus Ledbetter, played by Samuel L. Jackson, elects to live in a cave in New York City's Inwood Park. The response he evokes isn't, "Oh, my God, that man is me!" - which is what you would expect from a heartfelt exploration of homelessness - but "Oh, my God, that man is greater than I could ever be!" Romulus is a Juilliard-trained pianist who experienced a crack-up a la "Shine" that left him paranoid and possessed of scattered, blazing insights.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | June 4, 2000
You know what you want. So stop shortchanging yourself with TV shows that can't give it to you, that don't know how to give it to you. You deserve to spend your time with a show that can hit your intellectual, emotional and other assorted buttons -- and all in 22 commercial-free minutes. So dump that "Jesse" chick already and tune in and turn on to HBO's eroti-comedy "Sex and the City." The third season premieres tonight at 9. Look for your shallow, sleazy one-night television stands elsewhere.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | December 27, 1999
We may be approaching the year 2000, but Rob Becker is still trapped in prehistoric times.Becker, who turned his 1991 solo show, "Defending the Caveman," into a one-man industry, is bringing his comic look at the differences between the sexes back to the Lyric Opera House for its third engagement, beginning tonight."
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | February 11, 1997
I WENT TO see Rob Becker's one-man show "Defending the Caveman" and left thinking that my husband should put Becker on retainer. No man is more in need of defending right now than my own personal caveman.That's because he and I had a date for that show and he stood me up. Scheduled an out-of-town business trip. On our anniversary.Is he Rob Becker's poster boy or what?I planned this evening of fine dining and theater -- women are always doing the planning -- because I felt like 14 years of marriage in the current national rush to divorce merits more celebration than saloon food and a movie at the local multi-plex cinema.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | December 27, 1999
We may be approaching the year 2000, but Rob Becker is still trapped in prehistoric times.Becker, who turned his 1991 solo show, "Defending the Caveman," into a one-man industry, is bringing his comic look at the differences between the sexes back to the Lyric Opera House for its third engagement, beginning tonight."
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | March 18, 2003
ROB BECKER, the loveable lug of the one-man show Defending the Caveman, is heading back into his cave after more than a decade spent on tour helping men and women understand that they can't help the way they are: Anthropology is destiny. Becker will make his last stop in Baltimore from March 28 to 30 at the Lyric Opera House as part of a yearlong farewell tour. Then he will return to his wife, Erin, and three kids in Marin County, Calif., where he will polish the next act in his life: Defending the Cave Dad. "I wanted one more time around," says Becker.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 6, 1997
The Lyric is a very big cave. A very, very big cave.Put one lone caveman on the stage of the Lyric Opera House, and he nearly gets swallowed up.At least that's what's happening with the one-man show, "Rob Becker's Defending the Caveman." Maybe if the sound system were better, maybe if Becker's diction were clearer -- so that "chip bowl" (I think it was "chip bowl") didn't sound like "Chippendales" and "her magic" like "hermitage" -- it would be possible to appreciate his riff on the war between the sexes.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | February 3, 1997
The guys in junior high school came to rely upon Rob Becker to explain the great mystery of life: girls. They'd always see him walking to school with his buddy, Michelle, and her girlfriends. The girls, it turns out, had come to rely upon Becker to explain the great mystery of life: boys."I became the resident guy of the group," says Becker, writer and performer of "Defending the Caveman," a one-man show coming to the Lyric Opera House for eight performances tomorrow through Sunday."So they'd question me on the way to school, you know, 'Why would a guy say this to me?
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