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Cautionary Tale

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NEWS
June 3, 2013
Anne Neal's recent commentary ("Cautionary campus tale," May 30) seeks to conflate two separate issues into a unified insight about the pending collapse of America's higher education system. Her effort merits a failing grade. Yes, St. Mary's College of Maryland has suffered an "off" admission year, yielding fewer students than expected and budgeted for, but to argue that the shortfall is the result of admissions prospects rejecting the college's curriculum as having, in her words, "dubious educational value" is a stretch too far. While I sympathize with some perspectives espoused by her organization, the American Council of Trustees and Alumni, it is disingenuous to exploit an institution's temporary setback as an opportunity to advance the council's agenda.
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NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2013
I lived in Detroit for a summer once, in an apartment that was circled by the kind of barbed-wire fence you see around prisons. I wasn't sure if Detroit was being protected from me or the other way around. This was quite a long time ago, but Detroit's decline was already underway, for all the now-familiar reasons: the riots of the 1960s that the city would never fully recover from; the way its fortunes were too intertwined with its dominant industry, the car companies; the unstoppable flight to the suburbs.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2013
Baltimore officials say Detroit's bankruptcy filing this week is a cautionary tale for the city that underscores the need to fix a $750 million structural deficit before the situation here grows similarly dire. "It is on my mind every day," Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said Friday, the day after Detroit became the largest city in U.S. history to file for bankruptcy protection. "Once you know that's a possibility, you have to spend the rest of your time trying to prevent it. " Bankruptcy is not currently an option for Baltimore, or any jurisdiction in Maryland - the General Assembly has passed no law to authorize such a move.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2013
Baltimore officials say Detroit's bankruptcy filing this week is a cautionary tale for the city that underscores the need to fix a $750 million structural deficit before the situation here grows similarly dire. "It is on my mind every day," Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said Friday, the day after Detroit became the largest city in U.S. history to file for bankruptcy protection. "Once you know that's a possibility, you have to spend the rest of your time trying to prevent it. " Bankruptcy is not currently an option for Baltimore, or any jurisdiction in Maryland - the General Assembly has passed no law to authorize such a move.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | August 3, 2005
SO JURORS didn't believe Jason T. Richards' tale that he was just some innocent guy caught up in a bad situation. Quelle surprise. It took a Baltimore County Circuit Court jury only 90 minutes to convict Richards on Monday. He was found guilty of conspiring to murder 15-year- old Quartrina K. Johnson, who was killed last summer. Her murderers tried to dispose of her body by burning it in a Baltimore County park. The 25-year-old Richards was charged with being the ringleader of a plot that sought to murder not only Quartrina, but also her foster sister.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | October 12, 2003
WASHINGTON - As every creature on earth with a pulse knows by now, Arnold Schwarzenegger, the actor who played the cyborg from an apocalyptic future, is now the governor-elect of California. What once seemed improbable hardened into fact Tuesday as voters, fed up with a costly car tax, an energy crisis and a budget deficit, turned incumbent Gray Davis out of office. California, the state other states once wanted to be when they grew up, has become a cautionary tale. And 3.7 million voters thought Mr. Schwarzenegger was the man to fix that.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | April 24, 2008
Listen to your body. Get a doctor you really like and trust. Stop smoking. Jayne Miller smiles and laughs at her newfound mantras, truisms she's learned the hard way during the past two months. Hers is a good, hearty laugh, one that betrays not a hint of anything wrong - she neither looks nor sounds like a woman still recovering from brain surgery. Sitting on a picnic bench outside WBAL's TV Hill studios on a warm April afternoon, she seems as energetic and straightforward as ever, every inch the hard-driving investigative reporter who has been chasing after lying pols and corrupt businessmen for nearly three decades.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,Sun reporter | November 24, 2006
Michael A. Williams Jr. displayed his life on a makeshift stage at a state prison in Jessup recently, and when it was over, he wept. They were tears of anguish as Williams reflected on a misspent life dealing heroin and cocaine on the streets of West Baltimore - experiences he has captured in a play he calls Where Y'all At? At 37, "Li'l Mike" has had a lot of time to ponder and regret bad choices that led to a lengthy prison sentence at the Maryland Correctional Institution. He hopes that telling his story in dramatic form will serve as a cautionary tale for young people he sees traveling the same self-destructive road.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2013
Lotfy Nathan spent some five years putting together his film about West Baltimore's dirt-bike culture. Now, with national acclaim for "12 O'clock Boys" promising to turn it into one of the year's breakout documentaries after a February premiere at the South by Southwest arts festival in Austin, Texas, he's happily basking in the acclaim. "The reception in Austin was incredible," Nathan said last week from Toronto, where the film was being shown at the annual Hot Docs festival. "It was more than I could have asked for. " This week, a distribution deal with independent film distributors Oscilloscope Laboratories safely in hand, the Maryland Institute College of Art -educated Nathan is bringing his film home.
TOPIC
February 13, 2005
The World Israel and the Palestinians announced that they would cease violence in a landmark summit that appeared to offer the most hope for peace in the Middle East since 1993, when then-Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin and Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat sealed the Oslo peace accord with a famous handshake on the White House lawn. The accord sputtered for years until the Palestinian uprising broke out in 2000. North Korea declared that it had "manufactured nuclear weapons" and called for bilateral negotiations with the United States.
NEWS
June 3, 2013
Anne Neal's recent commentary ("Cautionary campus tale," May 30) seeks to conflate two separate issues into a unified insight about the pending collapse of America's higher education system. Her effort merits a failing grade. Yes, St. Mary's College of Maryland has suffered an "off" admission year, yielding fewer students than expected and budgeted for, but to argue that the shortfall is the result of admissions prospects rejecting the college's curriculum as having, in her words, "dubious educational value" is a stretch too far. While I sympathize with some perspectives espoused by her organization, the American Council of Trustees and Alumni, it is disingenuous to exploit an institution's temporary setback as an opportunity to advance the council's agenda.
NEWS
By Anne D. Neal | May 29, 2013
"Please sir, I want some more. " The famous phrase of Oliver Twist would seem tragically appropriate when it comes to the modus operandi of American higher education - but for the fact that Oliver Twist was a starving child and higher education is a bloated wastrel. But the higher ed bubble is bursting, right in our own backyard. And colleges and universities need to take note, to ensure their own survival. The case in point is St. Mary's College of Maryland, a 173-year-old public institution tucked between the Potomac River and Chesapeake Bay. After a decade of rising tuition, this public liberal arts college finds itself with 150 empty seats for the incoming freshman class.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2013
Lotfy Nathan spent some five years putting together his film about West Baltimore's dirt-bike culture. Now, with national acclaim for "12 O'clock Boys" promising to turn it into one of the year's breakout documentaries after a February premiere at the South by Southwest arts festival in Austin, Texas, he's happily basking in the acclaim. "The reception in Austin was incredible," Nathan said last week from Toronto, where the film was being shown at the annual Hot Docs festival. "It was more than I could have asked for. " This week, a distribution deal with independent film distributors Oscilloscope Laboratories safely in hand, the Maryland Institute College of Art -educated Nathan is bringing his film home.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel, b | July 26, 2011
What the Smurf?  I don't think I'm alone in feeling that the endless promos for the upcoming “Smurfs” movie have been painful. I mean, even Neil Patrick Harris can't save the day here. But the relaunch of “The Smurfs” got me thinking - which other 1980s cartoons should have been made into films before the wee blue folks? Here are my top five picks. •••• “Muppet Babies” Aired: 1984-1991 Why it's better than “The Smurfs”: As the theme song states, these babies make their dreams come true.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2011
In 2009, former Maryland basketball coach Lefty Driesell received a puzzling phone call. C.J. Leslie — a high school player recruited by Kentucky, Connecticut and other powerhouse programs — introduced himself and said he wanted to learn all he could about Len Bias, the Driesell-coached basketball prodigy Driesell paused for a moment. "I thought, 'Wait, this kid wasn't even born when Leonard passed away.' But Leonard was his favorite player. He had copied his game after Leonard's.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | April 24, 2008
Listen to your body. Get a doctor you really like and trust. Stop smoking. Jayne Miller smiles and laughs at her newfound mantras, truisms she's learned the hard way during the past two months. Hers is a good, hearty laugh, one that betrays not a hint of anything wrong - she neither looks nor sounds like a woman still recovering from brain surgery. Sitting on a picnic bench outside WBAL's TV Hill studios on a warm April afternoon, she seems as energetic and straightforward as ever, every inch the hard-driving investigative reporter who has been chasing after lying pols and corrupt businessmen for nearly three decades.
NEWS
June 17, 1992
Twenty years ago today, burglars with connections to the White House were arrested after they had broken into the Democratic National Committee headquarters at the Watergate complex in Washington. That break-in led to an organized conspiracy carried out by President Richard Nixon and his aides to use the law enforcement powers and agencies of the executive branch of the federal government to cover up official involvement with the crime. That in turn led to Mr. Nixon's forced resignation in disgrace, the only presidential resignation in the nation's history.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel, b | July 26, 2011
What the Smurf?  I don't think I'm alone in feeling that the endless promos for the upcoming “Smurfs” movie have been painful. I mean, even Neil Patrick Harris can't save the day here. But the relaunch of “The Smurfs” got me thinking - which other 1980s cartoons should have been made into films before the wee blue folks? Here are my top five picks. •••• “Muppet Babies” Aired: 1984-1991 Why it's better than “The Smurfs”: As the theme song states, these babies make their dreams come true.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | November 25, 2007
This afternoon's game at Qualcomm Stadium ought to serve as a reminder to all disgruntled Ravens fans hoping for only one thing under their Christmas trees: a new head coach: Be careful what you wish for. You could end up like the Ravens' opponent today, the San Diego Chargers. You could end up with these tradeoffs: Marty Schottenheimer for Norv Turner. The best record in the NFL for 5-5 with six games to go. The quarterback of the future for an inconsistent, undependable, poor-quality replica.
NEWS
By John Eisenberg and John Eisenberg,SUN REPORTER | May 2, 2007
His knees ache with pain so intense that he says he is unable to stand for more than a few minutes. "I look silly at cocktail parties. I'm the only one sitting down," said former Ravens defensive end Michael Mc- Crary. He is 36 years old. He has taken a blizzard of medications for chronic pain and depression, casually rattling off the names as if they were afternoon snacks. "I've been on Percocet, Percodan, OxyContin, oxycodone, three different psychiatric medicines," he said.
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