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By Karol V. Menzie and Ron Nodine | February 20, 2000
EVEN THE savviest do-it-yourselfer gets stumped sometimes by problems that crop up in the middle of some mundane chore. Pros expect these things and know how to fix them -- without spending a couple of hours on a Web site. Here are some common problems and what to do about them: Screws in a door are loose because the threads in the wood have been stripped. First, remove one screw at a time, so the door will stay in place with the remaining screws. Use a toothpick, or for larger screws, a wooden match.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2014
- The Battle of Caulk's Field, the engagement at which the local soldiers of the Kent County militia stood up to the highly trained British Royal Navy and Marines, unfolded in the darkness of the early morning of Aug. 31, 1814. The only light came from the moon and the flashes of the troops' muskets. On Sunday, the 200th anniversary of the pivotal skirmish, historical interpreters brought the battle out into the daylight, allowing spectators to see the action that foreshadowed the defense of Fort McHenry and the eventual American victory in the War of 1812.
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FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | April 2, 1994
Here's a refreshing change: A whole batch of home-repair problems that have absolutely nothing to do with horrible winter weather. Can spring be far behind?A reader in Harrison, N.Y., writes:"We have painted wood panel doors throughout the house. Although I have removed the paint down to the wood and primed the surface prior to painting, I cannot prevent the paint from cracking in the area where the panel inserts into the door itself. It appears to me the panel moves with changes of climate and/or humidity."
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2012
The DNA of a battle that helped turn the tide of a war going horribly wrong for America lay buried just six inches below the surface in a Kent County cornfield. For nearly two centuries, the musket balls, canister shot and other artifacts from intense fighting at Caulk's Field waited to tell the story of a sweltering August night in 1814, when militiamen sprang a trap on a British raiding party bent on destruction. How did the citizen-soldiers best their battle-tested foes at Caulk's Field?
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | November 12, 1994
Some people found the mid-term elections scary, but we know something that will strike terror in every heart: Winter is just around the corner.Remember the ice, snow, slush, sleet and days of temperatures below freezing? Our memories are so vivid that Randy has yet to remove the tire chains from the bed of his truck. It's time to take precautions, to gird yourself for the coming onslaught of nasty weather.One of the most hair-raising things about last winter may have been the utility bills.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | October 22, 1994
I have been caulking incorrectly. For years I have been using my fingers to smooth out the bead of caulk that I had put in the gap around a bathtub or a window frame. Then the other day I learned that it was risky to smooth the caulk.Smoothing the caulk bead with your finger may make the caulk too thin. A bead of caulk that is too thin can't expand to fill the gaps. That is what caulk is supposed to do, fill gaps. But skinny caulk can't provide as much protection against water as a bead of caulk that is pooching out."
BUSINESS
By Karol V. Menzie & Randy Johnson | July 20, 1997
WHEN IT comes to caulking, neatness counts. But so does using the right kind of caulk.Randy has been working on the chimneys of a townhouse where the original builder did very little to seal joints. The chimneys are wood because the house was built with two zero-clearance metal chimneys; the tops are wrapped in wood siding. Because the seams between corner trim and the siding were never sealed, water got into the siding and caused a lot of damage. It hadn't yet caused a roof leak, but that was probably going to be the next problem.
FEATURES
By ALAN J. HEAVENS and ALAN J. HEAVENS,PHILADELPHIA INQUIRE | October 1, 2005
Caulking season is upon us. Time to seal those gaps in windows, around doors and other places to reduce the amount of cold air seeping into your house, which contributes to higher energy bills. Here's a quick primer on the right materials and the right way to do the job: GETTING STARTED -- Get the right caulk for the job. Latex, acrylic and silicone are the three most common caulks; the first two are easier to apply and clean up, but they are not as long-lasting as silicone. Acrylic and latex can be painted, but paint will not adhere to silicone.
BUSINESS
By Carol V. Menzie & Randy Johnson | July 27, 1997
JUST ONE more question, ma'am, if you don't mind. I'm just curious -- don't mind my dog, he's just a little grumpy today -- I wonder why, ma'am, if you caulked the entire house before painting, there's a half-inch gap here under this window? I'm just asking because, ma'am, the suspect, Mr. Water, could have easily entered the house through a gap this size. "If caulk is like a box of chocolates -- there's one to suit every occasion -- the art of applying it could be likened to solving a Columbo mystery.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | November 10, 2007
This week's cold snap reminded me that it is time to try to make the house into an insulated bunker, sealing leaks, stopping drafts. There seem to be about 1,000 fronts on this battle. Tactics range from putting another layer of insulation in the attic, to inserting foam-insulating plates on the electrical outlets of outside walls, to putting sweeps on the bottoms of outside doors. They are all pretty boring. The only weatherization procedure that sounds like fun to me is detecting drafts by carrying a lighted incense stick around the house, watching to see where the smoke disappears.
BUSINESS
By Karen Youso and Karen Youso,McClatchy-Tribune | November 8, 2009
Every fall, we button up the house by cleaning and checking, fixing and sealing. Turns out that getting the house ready for winter isn't just a cold-winter thing - it's an eco-friendly thing, too. A tight house uses - and loses - less energy, requires fewer natural resources and produces less pollution. With just a bit of effort, you can make your fall house chores even greener. Here's how: Seal:: Gaps and spaces around windows and doors and in the attic can suck away up to 30 percent of your home's energy efficiency, according to the U.S. Department of Energy.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | March 29, 2009
The moment of truth arrived last week in a green-and-white envelope - a BGE bill. I opened the invoice slowly, then ran to consult last year's records. It was like opening a report card or a set of SAT scores. For the past 30 winters, I've lived in a drafty, 1870s Baltimore house where each room registers a different temperature. An upstairs bedroom would be Miami and one a flight down will feel like Garrett County. When my father visits, he wears heavy sweaters. Some friends say I have a tape recorder to emulate the sound of a furnace running.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | November 10, 2007
This week's cold snap reminded me that it is time to try to make the house into an insulated bunker, sealing leaks, stopping drafts. There seem to be about 1,000 fronts on this battle. Tactics range from putting another layer of insulation in the attic, to inserting foam-insulating plates on the electrical outlets of outside walls, to putting sweeps on the bottoms of outside doors. They are all pretty boring. The only weatherization procedure that sounds like fun to me is detecting drafts by carrying a lighted incense stick around the house, watching to see where the smoke disappears.
NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY and ANNIE LINSKEY,SUN REPORTER | July 3, 2006
Holding up a slimy leek at the Baltimore Farmers' Market yesterday, Earl Martin said the torrential rains that soaked the region are causing the vegetables he grows to "melt." "Have you ever seen decomposed grass?" Martin, 41, asked. "That's what the fields look like." Minus the rotting stalk, the leek he displayed is at least edible, he said. But he estimates the rains ruined 25 percent of the crops at his Perry Hall farm. Growers selling produce yesterday told horror stories of drowned pumpkins, waterlogged watermelons, soupy muck under the drying topsoil, and fields so full of water they could only be crossed with a rowboat.
BUSINESS
By WILL MORTON and WILL MORTON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 2, 2005
Fed up with paying nearly $500 a month for electricity and wood to heat his Joppa home, Jim Noonkester cut his heating bill in half when he installed a geothermal heat pump a decade ago. When he sold his 5,000- square-foot English Tudor house last year to buy a smaller home in Bel Air, he refused to go back to electric. "I told the Realtor, don't take me to a house unless it's got geothermal," said Noonkester, 62, a retired supermarket employee. Most people don't want to spend more than $20,000 to install geothermal systems, which use the Earth's interior heat to warm a home at about half the annual cost of oil or natural gas. But with the gulf hurricanes pushing up this year's already higher prices, the looming winter heating season takes on added urgency.
FEATURES
By ALAN J. HEAVENS and ALAN J. HEAVENS,PHILADELPHIA INQUIRE | October 1, 2005
Caulking season is upon us. Time to seal those gaps in windows, around doors and other places to reduce the amount of cold air seeping into your house, which contributes to higher energy bills. Here's a quick primer on the right materials and the right way to do the job: GETTING STARTED -- Get the right caulk for the job. Latex, acrylic and silicone are the three most common caulks; the first two are easier to apply and clean up, but they are not as long-lasting as silicone. Acrylic and latex can be painted, but paint will not adhere to silicone.
BUSINESS
By Karol V. Menzie & Randy Johnson | August 31, 1997
JUST WHEN we thought there wasn't anything more we could say about caulk, we get a letter from a reader in Queenstown with a caulking question we can't answer."
BUSINESS
By Dean Uhler | October 14, 2001
Possibly the most valuable skill a homeowner can have is the ability to caulk. More specifically, the ability to caulk properly. Shower surrounds and shower doors rely on caulk to keep water inside. At the exterior of a house, caulk helps keep water and drafts out. Even on low-maintenance house exteriors, there is often high-maintenance wood trim, mostly at window and door exteriors, and especially at bay windows. Wood trim is generally not rot-resistant, so it must be protected from moisture.
NEWS
September 2, 2004
On August 31, 2004, JAMES H. BIRCH JR. of Reisterstown, beloved son of James H. and Mary Ann Birch, loving brother of Edward (Ned) Charles Birch and his wife Gina and Kelly Anne Birch and her friend Matt Caulk. Also survived by his grandmother Anne M. Gentner, numerous aunts, uncles, friends, second cousins and his beloved first cousins: Tommy, Terry, Karen, Kathy, Greg, Richie, Sam, Jay, Kevin, Timmy, Katie, Patrick, Erin, Cassie, David, Ray and Matthew. Friends and family may call at WITZKE FUNERAL HOME OF CATONSVILLE, INC., 1630 Edmondson Avenue, Catonsville, on Thursday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 and Friday from 10 A.M. to 12 P.M. Mass of Christian Burial will be held at St. Mark Church, 27 Melvin Avenue, Catonsville on Saturday at 10 A.M. Inurnment New Cathedral Cemetery.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | August 23, 2004
Baltimore's harbor isn't exactly the Aegean Sea off the coast of Greece, but it did a pretty good imitation yesterday as thousands of people cheered on a men's pro beach volleyball tournament worthy of the Olympics - including the essential buff bodies, beach music and free-flowing beer. Organizers of the Toyota Pro Beach East tour hauled 200 tons of golf-course-grade sand into Rash Field to turn the south side of the Inner Harbor into a virtual beach. And the timing couldn't have been better, with the international spotlight turned on volleyball because of the wild popularity of the matches - and the physiques of the players - in Athens this month.
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