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By Chicago Tribune | August 9, 2008
BEIJING - The rumble began slowly, softly, as the 2,008 drummers in silvery robes each worked their hands on the bronze surface of a Fou, the oldest Chinese percussion instrument. And then the noise increased, rattling the Olympic Stadium, waves of sound soon punctuated by fireworks as the lights on the surfaces of the drums and the rhythmic movements of the percussionists turned the countdown to yesterday's start of the 2008 Olympics opening ceremony into a blend of technology and tradition.
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SPORTS
By Chicago Tribune | August 9, 2008
BEIJING - The rumble began slowly, softly, as the 2,008 drummers in silvery robes each worked their hands on the bronze surface of a Fou, the oldest Chinese percussion instrument. And then the noise increased, rattling the Olympic Stadium, waves of sound soon punctuated by fireworks as the lights on the surfaces of the drums and the rhythmic movements of the percussionists turned the countdown to yesterday's start of the 2008 Olympics opening ceremony into a blend of technology and tradition.
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NEWS
By Lois Burdett | November 28, 1999
Editor's note: This excerpt from Shakespeare's play about the misguided nobleman explores Macbeth's pivotal meeting with three witches who can see into the future.Macbeth sat brooding, his thoughts far away. "The Thane of Fife didn't come today.I wonder if he's hatching some plot.My spies will discover what I cannot.Tomorrow I'll meet the witches three, and ask what they can predict for me."The sisters were hidden in a cavern deep;Around the cauldron, they did creep.With their hands so crinkled with time,They stirred a stinking putrid slime.
SPORTS
By GRAHAME L. JONES | July 5, 2006
DORTMUND, Germany -- Italy has some tremendous soccer players, the sort who never give up, never stop running, never stop seeking ways to win. All of that was evident yesterday when Italy overcame not only Germany and almost 65,000 German fans at the cauldron of noise that is Westfalen Stadium, in a World Cup semifinal that crackled with tension and that was not decided until overtime itself had all but expired. world cup Portugal vs. France, 3 p.m. today, ESPN
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber | September 20, 2000
Late night on Olympic Boulevard is a quiet and precious time. There are eerie blue lights shining in the sky, a bunch of security guards fighting sleep and a work crew washing down the street and emptying the trash. It's all in stark contrast to the daytime hustle and bustle, when tens of thousands of fans troop to a dozen venues in hot pursuit of an Olympic moment. Over there, on the right, in the massive Olympic Stadium, quite simply the largest and most stupendous I've ever seen, all is still.
SPORTS
By GRAHAME L. JONES | July 5, 2006
DORTMUND, Germany -- Italy has some tremendous soccer players, the sort who never give up, never stop running, never stop seeking ways to win. All of that was evident yesterday when Italy overcame not only Germany and almost 65,000 German fans at the cauldron of noise that is Westfalen Stadium, in a World Cup semifinal that crackled with tension and that was not decided until overtime itself had all but expired. world cup Portugal vs. France, 3 p.m. today, ESPN
BUSINESS
December 21, 1995
Radiance Services Co.'s innovative method of "dry-cleaning" semiconductors has been honored by Industry Week magazine as Technology of the Year, the Bethesda-based company said yesterday.The company shared the honors with American Superconductor, Sun Microsystems, Red Pepper Software and Sandia National Laboratories.Radiance said its patented technology employs a pulsed laser and flowing gas to remove microscopic contaminants from computer chips, flat-panel displays, fiber-optic cables and other sensitive surfaces without using water or chemicals.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | September 16, 2000
SYDNEY, Australia - It was overwrought, but wonderful. Australia can only hope that the Olympics themselves are as spectacular as last night's opening ceremony. In a show bigger than the Outback, Australia displayed the audacity and exuberance that allowed it to land the Games of the XXVII Olympiad. The parade of most of the 10,000 athletes from 200 nations was outnumbered by performers, as a 90-minute display of entertainment ranged from psychedelic fantasy to high-wire act to boardwalk kitsch.
NEWS
February 28, 1995
ANOTHER view, from the editorial page (Feb. 22) of the Wilmington News Journal:"In her moment of triumph, Myrlie Evers-Williams, the new chairman of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, blew a kiss to a packed ballroom in a New York hotel over the weekend, and it roared its approval."That act probably means far more than the brusque, 'It's time to clean house. Where's my broom?' sound-bite most of us have seen repeatedly on TV."Dr. William F. Gibson, the South Carolina dentist who had been chairman for a decade, represented a class schism that has existed on the board for years.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 26, 2005
NABLUS, West Bank - In the nearly two years since Ghazi and Seham Jarwan's 17-year-old son Khamis blew himself up in a small grocery store in a Tel Aviv suburb, killing a 42-year-old father, their home has become a memorial to their son's life. A life-size poster of their son greets visitors in the doorway, and photos from his toddler and schoolboy years hang on the living room wall. More posters of him plaster the alleys here in the West Bank's largest city, where Khamis Jarwan is hailed as a hero, an inspiration for others to follow, his father says.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 26, 2005
NABLUS, West Bank - In the nearly two years since Ghazi and Seham Jarwan's 17-year-old son Khamis blew himself up in a small grocery store in a Tel Aviv suburb, killing a 42-year-old father, their home has become a memorial to their son's life. A life-size poster of their son greets visitors in the doorway, and photos from his toddler and schoolboy years hang on the living room wall. More posters of him plaster the alleys here in the West Bank's largest city, where Khamis Jarwan is hailed as a hero, an inspiration for others to follow, his father says.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 11, 2003
WASHINGTON - Turkey's alarm yesterday at the surge by Kurdish forces into the oil-rich city of Kirkuk in northern Iraq threw a spotlight on the ethnic and religious cauldron that American soldiers and diplomats now must keep from bubbling over. Iraq's population includes most of the Middle East's religions, ethnic groups and cultures, a diversity that many hope will one day become an example of harmony for a hate-riven region. But historically this patchwork has pitted rival groups against one another and threatened to pull apart a nation cobbled together by the British Empire at the end of World War I. Now, Iraq's first burst of freedom threatens to open a season of jockeying for power, revenge and score-settling that might preoccupy the United States as much as providing humanitarian relief and putting together a new government that represents the aspirations of all Iraqis.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber | September 20, 2000
Late night on Olympic Boulevard is a quiet and precious time. There are eerie blue lights shining in the sky, a bunch of security guards fighting sleep and a work crew washing down the street and emptying the trash. It's all in stark contrast to the daytime hustle and bustle, when tens of thousands of fans troop to a dozen venues in hot pursuit of an Olympic moment. Over there, on the right, in the massive Olympic Stadium, quite simply the largest and most stupendous I've ever seen, all is still.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | September 16, 2000
SYDNEY, Australia - It was overwrought, but wonderful. Australia can only hope that the Olympics themselves are as spectacular as last night's opening ceremony. In a show bigger than the Outback, Australia displayed the audacity and exuberance that allowed it to land the Games of the XXVII Olympiad. The parade of most of the 10,000 athletes from 200 nations was outnumbered by performers, as a 90-minute display of entertainment ranged from psychedelic fantasy to high-wire act to boardwalk kitsch.
NEWS
By Kurt Streeter and Kurt Streeter,SUN STAFF | May 7, 2000
For most of the past century what was made on the third floor was simple, definable product: Cans. They were stamped from sheets of metal, churned out with blunt efficiency: hundreds per minute, millions per week, hundreds of millions per year. Working on the third floor of Building 3 of the American Can Co. on Boston Street meant you and your future were also definable. You were union. Your job was to perform one repetitive, mind-numbing task, sometimes for decades. You worked on a floor that sometimes stole fingers and always sounded like a jackhammer: rhythmic, staccato pops that could be heard for blocks when the windows were open on summer days.
NEWS
By Lois Burdett | November 28, 1999
Editor's note: This excerpt from Shakespeare's play about the misguided nobleman explores Macbeth's pivotal meeting with three witches who can see into the future.Macbeth sat brooding, his thoughts far away. "The Thane of Fife didn't come today.I wonder if he's hatching some plot.My spies will discover what I cannot.Tomorrow I'll meet the witches three, and ask what they can predict for me."The sisters were hidden in a cavern deep;Around the cauldron, they did creep.With their hands so crinkled with time,They stirred a stinking putrid slime.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Sun Staff Writer | May 21, 1995
The witch who went to school got kicked out of class.A county book-screening council voted not to allow second-grade teachers to use "The Witch Goes to School," by Norman Bridwell, and will vote over the next week on eight other books objected to by some members.When a high school student who is a member of the screening committee defended the book by saying the witch in it is a good person, the mother behind her said, "This is the problem."For people of faith, a lot of Christians and a lot of Jewish people, they don't want their children thinking of witches as good people, people they should be friends with," said Nita Korn of Pleasant Valley, who has a child at West Middle School."
NEWS
By Kurt Streeter and Kurt Streeter,SUN STAFF | May 7, 2000
For most of the past century what was made on the third floor was simple, definable product: Cans. They were stamped from sheets of metal, churned out with blunt efficiency: hundreds per minute, millions per week, hundreds of millions per year. Working on the third floor of Building 3 of the American Can Co. on Boston Street meant you and your future were also definable. You were union. Your job was to perform one repetitive, mind-numbing task, sometimes for decades. You worked on a floor that sometimes stole fingers and always sounded like a jackhammer: rhythmic, staccato pops that could be heard for blocks when the windows were open on summer days.
BUSINESS
December 21, 1995
Radiance Services Co.'s innovative method of "dry-cleaning" semiconductors has been honored by Industry Week magazine as Technology of the Year, the Bethesda-based company said yesterday.The company shared the honors with American Superconductor, Sun Microsystems, Red Pepper Software and Sandia National Laboratories.Radiance said its patented technology employs a pulsed laser and flowing gas to remove microscopic contaminants from computer chips, flat-panel displays, fiber-optic cables and other sensitive surfaces without using water or chemicals.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Sun Staff Writer | May 21, 1995
The witch who went to school got kicked out of class.A county book-screening council voted not to allow second-grade teachers to use "The Witch Goes to School," by Norman Bridwell, and will vote over the next week on eight other books objected to by some members.When a high school student who is a member of the screening committee defended the book by saying the witch in it is a good person, the mother behind her said, "This is the problem."For people of faith, a lot of Christians and a lot of Jewish people, they don't want their children thinking of witches as good people, people they should be friends with," said Nita Korn of Pleasant Valley, who has a child at West Middle School."
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