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NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2002
State biologists have bagged a bundle of bad news: a 3-inch fingerling that looks a lot like a baby northern snakehead, the invader from overseas that has infested a pond in Crofton. Snakehead stalker Joe Gillespie - the Crofton angler who landed a 26-inch specimen two weeks ago - packed the little green creature in a plastic bag and gave it to Maryland Department of Natural Resources biologists yesterday. Gillespie told them he netted seven more just like it Monday night, said DNR spokesman John Surrick.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Norah Vincent and Norah Vincent,Special to the Sun | April 16, 2000
America hates a liar -- or, at least, it hates a liar who gets caught. Lies, per se, are not un-American, of course. By design, Hollywood, the American mythmaker, is and always has been a cottage industry of fancies and fakes. It has infected the whole of American life so much that we are almost unable to distinguish between real and celluloid life -- a truth richly examined in "Life: The Movie" by Neal Gabler (Knopf, 290 pages, $27.50). We like our history revisionist, our effects sanguinary and our endings sanguine.
NEWS
By JED KIRSCHBAUM and JED KIRSCHBAUM,SUN STAFF | April 5, 1996
NORTH EAST -- The shortnose sturgeon is a little thing, as sturgeon go, and so easily caught that here on the Chesapeake it was fished into oblivion a century ago. It's such a rare fish in the bay that the last confirmed sighting of one was in 1986.So when two fishermen who work the waters at the head of the bay checked their nets Tuesday and found one, it seemed like pretty big news. When they went back the next day and found two more, it was like hitting the sturgeon jackpot.For a fish that's long been on the endangered species list, it was an embarrassment of riches.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2002
Nine teen-age boys who removed a window and cut through two fences to escape from the Charles H. Hickey School on Saturday were back in custody by the end of the night, authorities said yesterday. Two of the boys were caught shortly after the 8:30 p.m. escape from the school for juvenile offenders in Cub Hill. State troopers and Baltimore County police, using helicopters and police dogs, caught the other seven escapees about 11:40 p.m. in a residential area near Joppa Road and Walther Boulevard, about two miles from the school.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | August 7, 1999
OCEAN CITY -- Through the first four days of this year's White Marlin Open, 225 white marlin were caught, but none met the tournament's minimum weight of 65 pounds.Yesterday, nearly $800,000 hung in the balance as some 260 boats ran out to the offshore canyons."That's what one 65-pound white marlin would be worth across the board," Open co-chairman Andy Motsko said shortly after the scales opened at Harbor Island Marina. "But that's if only one white is weighed in."Or, if the same boat weighed in the top two white marlins of the week, which tournament officials said never had been done.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | April 27, 2001
The recreational flounder season will be closed for 13 days this summer, and the size limits for ocean and Chesapeake Bay catches will increase under revised regulations released by the Department of Natural Resources. The new rules, which take effect immediately and run through the end of the year, close the season beginning July 25 through Aug. 6. The minimum size for the Atlantic Ocean, its coastal bays and tributaries has increased one inch to 17 inches. Flounder caught in the Bay and its tributaries must be at least 17 inches long, an increase of 1 1/2 inches.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | October 21, 1999
Just when the best bass fishermen in the country thought they had the Potomac River figured out, Tim Horton, a first-year touring pro from Spruce Pine, Ala., won the recent Kmart Bassmaster Top 150 tournament at Smallwood State Park in Charles County. Last week Horton was able to adapt to gusty winds, silty water and contrary tides and caught a total of 77 pounds, 8 ounces of bass, beating his nearest competitor by almost 16 pounds. "I was hoping that within five years I could win [a major tournament]
SPORTS
By SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 7, 1998
OCEAN CITY -- Entering the last day of the White Marlin Open, Crownsville angler Roger Viens holds first place with a 79.5-pound catch that could be worth $480,000 if no larger white is caught today.In the blue marlin division, Buddy Doughtery of Alexandria, Va., maintained his hold on first with a 354-pound blue potentially worth $310,000.Tournament director Chuck Motsko said catch-and-release action continued to be good for white marlin yesterday, but none of the few weighed in was large enough to budge any of the leaders.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2001
TAMPA, Fla. - When Shannon Sharpe talks, the Ravens listen ... and now believe. The veteran tight end with loose lips has complemented his big mouth with big plays, carrying the Ravens offensively to the Super Bowl. In the playoffs, Sharpe has caught five passes for 225 yards, which accounts for 34 percent of the Ravens' offense. But it's his timing that adds the magical touch. Before a Ravens drive in the AFC championship game, Sharpe told his teammates in the huddle, "We're going to be on `SportsCenter' tonight.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,Sun Staff Writer | November 8, 1994
Federal prosecutors yesterday portrayed Nathaniel Dawson Jr. as an arrogant drug lord who -- after the death of 10-year-old Tauris Johnson in a drug gang shootout last year -- plotted to kill those who might finger him and boasted that he would never be caught.But defense lawyers responded that the case against Dawson, his father and two other defendants had been manipulated by witnesses who would say anything to buy their way out of lengthy prison terms.The daylong closing arguments by the prosecution and three defense lawyers signaled the end of five weeks of testimony.
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