Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCaucus Members
IN THE NEWS

Caucus Members

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun Sun staff writer JoAnna Daemmrich contributed to this article | August 18, 1994
WASHINGTON -- With the switch of at least three votes, the Congressional Black Caucus made clear yesterday that it would come to President Clinton's rescue on the crime bill.After a meeting at the White House with Mr. Clinton, three Black Caucus members who had voted against bringing the $33 billion measure up for final House vote last week announced that they had succumbed to his appeals to save not only the crime bill but perhaps his presidency."He was selling his presidency, the party and the fact that we will not get a better bill than this," said Rep. Charles B. Rangel, a New York Democrat who found Mr. Clinton persuasive.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By ANDREW A. GREEN and ANDREW A. GREEN,SUN REPORTER | May 25, 2006
Maryland's Legislative Black Caucus unveiled yesterday a six-point plan to deal with rising electricity rates and demanded that Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. call a special session of the General Assembly to enact the reforms by June 15. If the governor declines, caucus members said they will seek a special session by circulating a petition that would need the signatures of a majority of the Assembly's 188 members. Their plan calls for instituting rate caps to allow an increase of about 12 percent in electric bills; holding up the pending merger between BGE's parent company, Constellation Energy Group, and a Florida utility; forcing Constellation to sell energy to Maryland customers at a discount; firing the members of the Public Service Commission; and other measures.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Washington Bureau of The Sun | September 17, 1994
WASHINGTON -- It is probably fitting that President Clinton's nationally televised threat to oust the leaders of Haiti's military regime came during the height of the Congressional Black Caucus' annual celebration and legislative conference here.The Black Caucus has been the most visible group prodding Mr. Clinton to take a more aggressive stand on Haiti. And the fact that Mr. Clinton is threatening an invasion, despite polls showing tepid American support for it, is evidence of the group's newfound clout, observers say."
NEWS
July 11, 2005
WHEN INCREASED numbers of black Americans cast their votes for President Bush last fall, some political watchers began immediately questioning the relevance of the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC) and speculating that the all-Democratic group of lawmakers was losing influence with black voters and on Capitol Hill. In the months since however, the CBC has quietly worked behind the scenes, meeting with key Bush administration cabinet officials, forging relationships with Republican lawmakers, strengthening ties with the Hispanic and Asian-American caucuses - all with the aim of meeting policy goals the group set at the start of the year.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Evening Sun Staff | February 27, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Most members of the Congressional Black Caucus are in the ironic position of opposing the Persian Gulf war while being proud of a man who shaped the battle plan, Gen. Colin Powell.They see Powell, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, as a role model for blacks, even though they deplore the war. After the caucus met privately with Powell yesterday, Maryland Rep. Kweisi Mfume, D-7th, said:"Everyone in the caucus, I think to a person, has been extremely proud of the way the chairman has conducted himself, the professionalism he brings to his job, the sensitivity he brings to groups" like the caucus, Mfume said.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 8, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Although Jesse Jackson is not a candidate for president, he continues to campaign for support from black voters, damaging Virginia Gov. L. Douglas Wilder's bid for the Democratic nomination, aides to the governor claim."
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau | November 7, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Baltimore Rep. Kweisi Mfume is locked in a race to become the next head of the Congressional Black Caucus, whose unprecedented electoral gains could make it a key power center in the 103rd Congress and a prod for Bill Clinton's attention to black concerns.The 44-year-old Baltimore lawmaker, currently the vice chairman of the caucus, could not be reached for comment.He is considered the front-runner in the race to succeed Rep. Ed Towns, according to sources, who point to his second-in-command status and behind-the-scenes work.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 13, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Even as many Democrats on Capitol Hill distance themselves from President Clinton in the wake of the independent counsel's report, members of the Congressional Black Caucus have emerged as Clinton's most ardent defenders.Nearly half of the 63 Democrats who voted against releasing the report by Whitewater independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr were caucus members angry that Republicans rejected the White House's request to review the report before it was made public. Twenty-nine of the 35 caucus members who voted Friday opposed the measure.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Lyle Denniston and Karen Hosler and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 11, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The Congressional Black Caucus, the group that vetoed one of President Clinton's earlier choices for the government's top civil rights post, unanimously endorsed yesterday the current choice: Boston lawyer Deval Patrick."
NEWS
February 4, 1994
The decision this week of the Congressional Black Caucus to repudiate any formal ties with Nation of Islam Minister Louis Farrakhan comes as no surprise to those who have followed the fortunes of the fiery separatist leader. Mr. Farrakhan has made a career of bashing mainstream civil rights figures as racial Quislings and Uncle Toms. He is also a virulent anti-Semite whose views have more in common with neo-Nazis and the Ku Klux Klan than with Martin Luther King.Although Mr. Farrakhan dismissed a top aide Thursday for making anti-Semitic remarks, he coupled the rebuke with vitriolic attacks on the Anti-Defamation League and Vice President Al Gore.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Tim Craig and Howard Libit and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | October 15, 2002
Democrat Kathleen Kennedy Townsend signed a "shared vision" with Baltimore-area black lawmakers yesterday, pledging her support for such initiatives as expanded drug treatment, more aid to historically black colleges and additional state contracts for minority businesses. The agreement - under development since last month's primary election - was similar to a pledge signed last week by Republican Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., prompting black legislators yesterday to accuse the GOP of stealing their ideas.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 12, 2001
WASHINGTON - Some of Rep. Albert R. Wynn's colleagues in the Congressional Black Caucus say they are troubled, even angry, that he would work to defeat what they see as a crucial political reform. The Prince George's County Democrat has joined conservative Republicans, including the House Republican whip, Tom DeLay of Texas, to play a pivotal role in undermining support for a campaign finance bill that has become a signature issue for Democrats. His opposition could help lead to the House defeat today of a measure intended to stem the tide of unlimited "soft money" into political campaigns.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 13, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Even as many Democrats on Capitol Hill distance themselves from President Clinton in the wake of the independent counsel's report, members of the Congressional Black Caucus have emerged as Clinton's most ardent defenders.Nearly half of the 63 Democrats who voted against releasing the report by Whitewater independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr were caucus members angry that Republicans rejected the White House's request to review the report before it was made public. Twenty-nine of the 35 caucus members who voted Friday opposed the measure.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | January 15, 1996
When a male-dominated committee gutted a bill that would have toughened domestic violence laws, the women of the Maryland legislature had had enough.Female delegates revolted, introducing amendment after amendment that restored key provisions. In doing so, they ran roughshod over unwritten rules of House loyalty -- and the notion that women could be taken for granted.That moment two years ago highlighted the potential power of the General Assembly's women -- power notable for how seldom it has been wielded.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Sun Staff Writer | March 27, 1995
Robert Harvey Kittleman, neophyte minority leader of the Maryland House of Delegates, utters an audible sigh as he leaves the weekly meeting of the 41-member Republican caucus. "It's pandemonium," he says. "Really tough. We have to decide which way to go."He's talking about strategies Republicans should take in the 141-seat House, where they're heavily outnumbered. But he also could be talking about surviving as minority leader beyond this legislative session.Survival was never supposed to be an issue.
NEWS
By ADONIS E. HOFFMAN | November 15, 1994
Washington.--The American electorate changed the course of American politics last week. Buried among the many stories of defeated incumbents will be the inglorious end of an era for black members of Congress, who will now become the minority's minority.While most black members were easily re-elected, the collective clout of the Congressional Black Caucus was foreclosed the moment Republicans achieved majority status in the House.Reaching a record-high 40 members in 1992, the Black Caucus boasted a political status far superior to its numbers.
NEWS
By WILEY A. HALL III | December 27, 1992
Ihappened to mention to a colleague that Rep. Kweisi Mfume, D. 7th, has been elected chairman of the CBC."What's the CBC?" he asked."You know," I said, "the Congressional Black Caucus.""Ah yes," said my colleague appreciatively, "they host the best fashion show in town."Similarly, news accounts of Mfume's rise to the chairmanship a few weeks ago noted that as chairman he will preside over the annual Congressional Black Caucus Weekend, which, with its fashion show and gala ball, has become the premier social event for the black hoi polloi in Washington, D.C. You would think that this is all the caucus is about -- fashion shows, and fancy dress balls and invitation-only dinners.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau | December 9, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Rep. Kweisi Mfume of Baltimore is set tonight to become the leader of the increasingly powerful Congressional Black Caucus, a position that will give him and the Maryland delegation heightened visibility in the nextCongress.Several caucus members said they expect Mr. Mfume to capture the chairmanship in his contest with Rep. Craig Washington, a Houston Democrat who is making a strong push among the large crop of freshman lawmakers. The secret ballot set for tonight marks the first contested race for the leadership of the caucus, which usually elevates its vice chairman.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 19, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The Congressional Black Caucus' 24th Annual Legislative Conference is ground zero of black political meetings.For the 40 black caucus members -- 39 House members (including the non-voting delegate from the District of Columbia, Eleanor Holmes Norton) and one senator, Carol Mosely Braun of Illinois -- the conference, which ended late Saturday night, was a celebration of their existence.Here are selected sights and sounds of black legislators and their friends.To officially open the five-day conference, Rep. Kweisi Mfume, D-Md.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Washington Bureau of The Sun | September 17, 1994
WASHINGTON -- It is probably fitting that President Clinton's nationally televised threat to oust the leaders of Haiti's military regime came during the height of the Congressional Black Caucus' annual celebration and legislative conference here.The Black Caucus has been the most visible group prodding Mr. Clinton to take a more aggressive stand on Haiti. And the fact that Mr. Clinton is threatening an invasion, despite polls showing tepid American support for it, is evidence of the group's newfound clout, observers say."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.