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By John Steadman | April 6, 1994
AUGUSTA, Ga. -- Standing in awe of Augusta National Golf Club and its intrinsic splendor, while waiting in anticipation of another Masters Championship, gives reason to pause and consider what this green and glorious venue may have looked like a half-century ago during the perilous days of World War II.Augusta National, as with the rest of America, underwent emergency change. It shut down. Totally. Well, almost.In 1942, only four months after the start of the war, the course was closed for the duration.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
Robert A. Ballantine Sr., a retired mason who owned several farms, died Sunday of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at St. Catherine's Nursing Center in Emmitsburg. He was 77. The son of William A. Ballantine, a mason, and Margaret V. Pennell Ballantine, a Westinghouse Electric Corp. worker, Robert Andrew Ballantine was born and raised on his grandfather's Princess Anne farm and in Dorsey. He attended Anne Arundel County public schools and then went to work in 1953 as a brick and block mason and also poured foundations.
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BUSINESS
February 4, 1998
MetaMorphix Inc., a Catonsville biotechnology company, yesterday announced a new effort to develop leaner cattle and other agricultural products.MetaMorphix specializes in discovering and developing "growth and differentiation factors," molecules that regulate cell growth. Founded in 1994 based on GDF research by Dr. Se-Jin Lee of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, the firm has looked for applications in treating human disorders, such as muscular dystrophy.But research published in November by Lee showed manipulation of one protein, myostatin, produced a strain of muscular "mighty mice," and might have applications in growing beefier cattle.
BUSINESS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2014
J.W. Treuth & Sons has been nestled in Oella so long, Michael Treuth said no one can figure out quite when the family-owned slaughterhouse and butcher shop first opened its doors, though a sign out front boasts more than 100 years in the business. The 56-year old president and co-owner has been working in the family business for more than 40 years, and said the meat industry is what he "lives and breathes, literally. " Treuth & Sons only slaughters cattle, but it also buys wholesale and then sells and ships chicken, poultry and seafood products to customers, primarily restaurants, nationwide.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | July 12, 1992
Havre de Grace. -- Tom Lehrer, the lyric poet of an earlier age, wrote one of his most moving songs about a visit to a Mexican plaza de toros. One verse observes that "there is surely nothing more beautiful in this world than the sight of a lone man, facing single-handedly a half-ton of angry pot roast."That was a less sensitive time, remember, when the subject of meat wasn't as politically volatile. Nowadays you wouldn't hear such a song. But I found it running through my head recently when the big Angus bull I had borrowed from Ham Amoss earlier this spring departed for the Lancaster stockyards.
NEWS
September 3, 1991
Sixteen strange-looking cows and a calf were stolen from a New Market pasture late last week, the second cattle rustling in several days in Frederick County, according to state police.Emerson L. Burrier of Frederick said that he went to the pasture off Route 75 Saturday afternoon and found that beef cattle worth at least $12,800 were missing, probably taken away in one or two trucks between Thursday and Saturday.The cattle look unusual because of the breeding, the farmer said: "I take an odd of one thing and an odd of another and breed them."
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | April 18, 1993
CHATSWORTH, Ill. -- Any other year, Ken Kurtenbach' crossbred beef cows would be out in the pasture by now, tearing at the sweet spring grass and watching their newborn calves hop in the sunshine.But this cold, wet spring, the grass is only beginning to turn green, the mud is deep enough to suck a boot off, and Mr. Kurtenbach and his 25 cows are still in the barn, battling a mystery plague that is felling newborn calves by the hundreds across the Midwest.The problem, which has veterinarians baffled and farmers like Mr. Kurtenbach worried sick, is loosely termed "weak calf syndrome."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | March 30, 2009
Nicholas Bosley Merryman, a farmer and Hereford cattle breeder who managed the historic Hayfields property in Cockeysville, died of Alzheimer's disease March 25 at his Parkton home. He was 96. He was born at Hayfields, where his family had resided for more than 200 years. To distinguish himself from other Merryman cousins, he used the name Nicholas Bosley Merryman of John. Family members said he thought of becoming an engineer. In 1930 he enrolled at the John Hopkins University but soon left school and became a seaman aboard the freighter Anniston City on a round-the-world voyage.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 17, 1994
DALLAS -- People in Fort Worth, 30 miles west of here, have long had a pithy way of explaining the difference between the two cities. Fort Worth is where the West begins, they say. Dallas is where the East peters out.But in one enormous artistic undertaking on a 4.2-acre plot downtown, Dallas is now officially on a mission to redraw forever the boundary of the American frontier.The city is erecting a giant bronze rendering of a 19th-century cattle drive, with 70 6-foot-high steers and three trail riders herding them up a ridge and past a man-made limestone cliff a block from City Hall.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
Robert A. Ballantine Sr., a retired mason who owned several farms, died Sunday of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at St. Catherine's Nursing Center in Emmitsburg. He was 77. The son of William A. Ballantine, a mason, and Margaret V. Pennell Ballantine, a Westinghouse Electric Corp. worker, Robert Andrew Ballantine was born and raised on his grandfather's Princess Anne farm and in Dorsey. He attended Anne Arundel County public schools and then went to work in 1953 as a brick and block mason and also poured foundations.
NEWS
May 6, 2014
Scientist Megan Rolf need not reinvent the wheel ( "Breeding animals to stand the heat," May 5). In the 1950s, my father, Allan O.S. Keeling, developed the Jamaica Red Poll breed, along with other Jamaican cattle breeders. His imported Red Poll beef cattle from England were crossed with the Indian Brahman to produce an animal with fine tasting beef and a greater ability to fight off tropical diseases and pests. Annual and careful appraisals of every animal in the breeding herds resulted in (to quote Dr. Rolf)
NEWS
By David Horsey | April 29, 2014
The right wing insurrection at the Bundy ranch in Bunkerville, Nev., has taken another weird turn with new revelations about the family history of Cliven Bundy. Mr. Bundy justifies his two-decade-long refusal to pay the Bureau of Land Management for grazing rights on the public land where he runs his cattle by claiming his ancestors gained livestock water rights in the 1870s, long before the federal government horned in on the deal. Now, it turns out, that is not exactly true.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2014
Ellie Cattle has an impressive collection of musical talents: violin, viola, cello, and most recently, guitar and mandolin. And she'll show off her talent this weekend at the Privateer Festival in Fells Point (Friday-Sunday; fellspointmainstreet.org), playing violin for award-winning group the Pyrates Royale. You can check out the group performing traditional maritime, Irish and English folk music on Saturday at 11:00 a.m. and 2:45 p.m. or Sunday at 1:30 p.m. and 5:15 p.m. Cattle joined the group as the fiddler after her old private viola teacher vacated the position for a long-term gig out of town.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 26, 2014
Lewis B. Whiting Jr., a retired businessman and charter boat captain, died Jan. 8 of lung cancer at West Virginia University Medical Center in Morgantown. The former Towson resident was 73. The son of Dr. Lewis B. Whiting Sr., an orthopedic surgeon, and Kathryn Ahern Ford Whiting, a registered nurse, Lewis Butler Whiting Jr. was born in Baltimore and raised at Ellerslie Farm, his family's Catonsville farm. He attended McDonogh School and graduated in 1958 from Augusta Military Academy in Staunton, Va. He was a graduate of Baltimore City Community College, where he earned a degree in X-ray technology, and later attended Palm Beach Community College in Palm Beach, Fla. He also was a graduate of the Law Enforcement Academy in Palm Beach County, Fla. During the 1960s, Mr. Whiting was the owner and operator of the Whiting Cattle Co. in Stewartstown, Pa. He had been president of the Young Cattlemen's Association of York County, Pa. He had been an administrator in the department of radiology and nuclear medicine at what is now University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center, and a manufacturers representative for G.B. Stump Associates in Baltimore.
NEWS
By John McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | December 23, 2013
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your vocabulary. This week's word:  SPREE You may face temptations this week and next to go on a little spree, perhaps of shopping, perhaps of drinking, perhaps of overeating. A spree is a burst of indulgence or activity, or perhaps a jolly outing. Because of those senses, editors at The Sun  have tended to shun the terms crime spree  or shooting spree , on the ground that shooting people ought not to be treated like a binge.  But a recent post at Language Log   goes into the etymology of the word as recorded in the American Heritage Dictionary , which shows more complex origins.  It appears to descend from the Scots spreath , for "cattle raid.
ENTERTAINMENT
Lauren McEwen and For The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2013
Olivia's life isn't finished imploding, which is both entertaining and frustrating to watch. I think half of the joy of watching “Scandal” is being able to route for Olivia as she ruthlessly ensures the best outcome for her client. Even though her moral compass currently points nowhere near North, I like to watch her put powerful people in their place. I was beginning to worry that she had no fight left, especially when we open up to her begrudgingly eating Sunday dinner with Daddy Pope.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 5, 2008
NEW DELHI - Brajveer Singh does not own a wide-brimmed hat, leather boots or a pair of jeans. He has never ridden a mechanical bull. But he can lay claim to being a real-life urban cowboy. Singh is among the dozens of men who spend their days roping cattle on the streets of this city as part of a long and frustrating battle to rid India's capital of stray cows. There is perhaps no more stereotypical image of India than that of a stray cow sauntering down the middle of a busy city street, seemingly oblivious to the traffic swerving around it. Hindus consider cows sacred animals, and their slaughter is banned throughout most of India.
NEWS
By Cynthia Glover and Cynthia Glover,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 8, 2003
Would it surprise you to learn that Maryland cattlemen produced 84 million pounds of beef in 2000? That wasn't even a banner year. In 1999, they produced 95.9 million pounds. OK, so the state will never be called "Little Texas." For that, you'd be talking more than 7.7 billion pounds a year. Still, it's an impressive showing for a small mid-Atlantic state. Where does the beef go? Most of it is sold wholesale to regional meatpackers, where it might become, say, part of a McDonald's hamburger served somewhere around the world.
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 24, 2013
On April 14, members of the Blue Ribbon 4-H Club presented their demonstrations to the club. Among those participating were Sarah Fielder "Smores Galore," Madie Potee "Cow Identification," Laura Fielder "Shabby Chic and So Unique," Mckenzie McCann "Dunkaroo Dip," Hannah Burgess "Saddle Up," Samantha Fielder "Super Sewing Tools," Katie Potee "Cattle By Products" and Beth Johnson "Before You Show, You Should Know. "
EXPLORE
Aegis staff report | April 2, 2013
Aberdeen Ronald Brian Comer, 26, of the first block of North Post Road, was charged Friday with failing to appear in court in a case in which he was charged with possessing a drug other than marijuana and possessing paraphernalia. Rachell Renee Gray, 29, of the first block of East Bel Air Avenue, was charged Sunday with second-degree assault. Barry Lee Berkenkemper, 57, of the 1400 block of South Philadelphia Boulevard, was charged Tuesday with failing to appear in court on a case in which he was charged with theft below $100.
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