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By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2014
A few months after adopting a kitten, David Grimm and his fiancee huddled late one evening in the waiting room of a Towson emergency vet. Jasper, their normally rambunctious gray-and-white kitten, was suffering from acute kidney failure. Although the couple had only had Jasper for a short time, he had become a member of their family. Facing the prospect of his death was devastating. Grimm looked around the waiting room. Families were keeping the sorts of grim vigils usually associated with hospital emergency rooms.
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By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2014
A few months after adopting a kitten, David Grimm and his fiancee huddled late one evening in the waiting room of a Towson emergency vet. Jasper, their normally rambunctious gray-and-white kitten, was suffering from acute kidney failure. Although the couple had only had Jasper for a short time, he had become a member of their family. Facing the prospect of his death was devastating. Grimm looked around the waiting room. Families were keeping the sorts of grim vigils usually associated with hospital emergency rooms.
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NEWS
January 1, 2003
IF BALTIMORE is anything like the average American city, its 257,000 households have a total of 171,050 dogs and 184,209 cats. But even though pets are supposed to be licensed every year, city owners have bought permits for only 9,410 dogs and a few hundred cats. With the new year here, this is a good time for city dwellers to resolve to register their pets. Just the pet identification tag they get in return for the annual fee - usually $10 - makes it worthwhile. "With new microchip technology, if a pet gets lost, we are very likely to find it," Dr. Peter Beilenson, the city health commissioner, says of the tags, which have only a register number but carry no name or address.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez and For The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2012
You know how little kids' eyes light up when the Christmas tree makes its grand appearance in the living room? That's nothing compared to the way I've seen pets' faces show surprise and delight the first time they see one. A tree! In the house! The problem, of course, is that giving a curious dog or cat free access to holiday decorations can not only end in an annoying (and messy) way, but can be downright dangerous to them. Much as we love to look at our sparkly Christmas accoutrements, our dogs and cats tend to explore them by mouth, and that can spell bad news.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | October 30, 2010
There was no mistaking Mary Schaub as she passed along the streets of Charles Village. I never saw her in any footwear but high heels. This time of the year, she might be sporting a mink stole over a tailored suit. She was easy to chat up and seemed to invite casual conversation at the bus stop. She had a tradition-heavy Baltimore job. She was a pari-mutuel clerk, another way of saying she sold or cashed tickets at Pimlico or Laurel. We often spoke of the pleasures and perils of playing the ponies.
FEATURES
By Gina Spadafori and Gina Spadafori,McClatchy News Service | August 8, 1992
No sensible person has more than two dogs. You can pet two dogs at once, walk two dogs at once, carry two food bowls at once without spilling and snuggle two dogs on the couch at once, one on your left and one on your right.But "sensible" has never been a trait I particularly admired, at least not as it applies to animals. So in my house, leashes tangle, food bowls spill and dogs sprawl across my lap as I try to read.There's something fascinating about a group of animals, and I love watching the subtle body language they use with one another.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to the Sun | January 31, 1999
Pets, notably dogs and cats, are as essential to American life as TV -- and are a far better influence. The intellectual cat, I am pleased to note, has surpassed the low- brow dog as the nation's pet of choice, but with 54 million cat owners and 51 million dog owners, one thing is clear: Americans love companion animals.Studies show pets increase the life span of the elderly, lower blood pressure in adults and teach children responsibility. Conversely, abuse of animals frequently indicates sociopathology that can be precursor to other crimes, from domestic violence to serial murder.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 6, 2002
WASHINGTON - Just before the lights were switched off for the summer on Capitol Hill last week, after the attention-grabbing votes, chest-thumping news conferences and passionate floor speeches, the Senate got down to business. Not the business that will be written about in history books - such as granting President Bush "fast-track" trade authority, which was the last roll-call vote that senators cast before boarding airplanes to be whisked home for the monthlong August break. This was the more mundane but politically invaluable task of passing the obscure, minor measures that are the legislative odds and ends of Congress - more often known as "cats and dogs."
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 26, 1996
Somewhere in "Ghostbusters," Dan Aykroyd is trying to convince the mayor of New York that the apocalypse is approaching and he sums up the terrors about to be unleashed, including lightning, tornadoes, earthquakes, fire and brimstone. His partner, Bill Murray, deadpans an addition: "Cats and dogs, living together."Well, if we get movies as funny as "The Truth About Cats and Dogs" out of it, the apocalypse might be all right.The movie, which takes as its subject the difficulty of cats and dogs living together, or at least getting together, is as good a romantic comedy as has come this way in a long time.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 4, 2001
Conspiracy theorists take note: There's something fishy about the hidden war divulged in "Cats and Dogs." For one thing, the advertisements ask, "Who will you root for?" But as an animal-world version of a wrestling smack-down, it's a dog's show, paws down. It gives cat lovers no alternative - unless they're the kind who cheer for the cat-caressing arch-villain Blofeld in the Bond movies. As a movie, it's a robo-dog: even its friskiness is jerkily programmed. In "Cats and Dogs," the feline leader is a hairy white Persian that might well have learned his trade in Blofeld's lap. His name is Mr. Tinkles, and he wants not merely to purge the planet of dogs, but also to enslave humans.
FEATURES
October 5, 2012
Dogs can bowl, go through an agility course, play hide and seek and Musical Sit 'n Stay, swim, participate in a costume parade and more at the fifth annual DogFest at the Baltimore Humane Society in Reisterstown on Saturday, Oct 6. But wait, there's more. Pets can compete for best costume, best trick and best kisser in various contests. Vets and trainers will be on hand to answer pet-owner questions and various vendors will have info booths. Bring some extra cash and have lunch -- plenty of food vendors will be at the event, too. Worried cats are getting left out?
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | September 19, 2012
After a "rain delay" Tuesday, pesticide spraying is set to begin in the first of two Baltimore County neighborhoods where health officials say they've identified two new cases of West Nile virus. The Maryland Department of Agriculture is to spray parts of Catonsville after 7:30 p.m. Wednesday (Sept. 19) and again on the evening of Sept. 26.  A planned spraying Tuesday night in Pikesville was postponed because of stormy weather; spraying there is now scheduled to take place Sept.
FEATURES
By Rachel Martin and The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2012
Baltimore Animal Rescue and Care Shelter ( BARCS) is one of 108 shelters across the country  officially in the running for slots in The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) Rachael Ray $100K Challenge. The top 50 shelters will compete for a $100,000 grand prize and more than $500,000 in prize grants. The top 50 shelters will be chosen through online public voting. After the contestants are selected, the participating shelters will try to save at least 300 more cats and dogs during August, September and October 2012 than they did in the same time period in 2011.
NEWS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2011
Moira Liskovec doesn't agree with the adage that cats and dogs fight like … well, cats and dogs. In fact, Liskovec thinks the opposite is true. "I believe cats and dogs get along better than two cats," Liskovec said recently at Small Miracles, the Howard County cat rescue shelter she started five years ago. "You bring a dog into the picture, and most likely they're going to be best friends. I had a German shepherd, and I had a 6-pound cat who would totally chew on his head gently," she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | June 24, 2011
Once upon a time, a little boy named Pierre got a stuffed animal monkey. "Pierre named him Boo-Boo Monkey," writes his mother, Celine. "It is his best friend, he takes him everywhere, he wanted me to put some diapers on monkey (because according to Pierre Monkey is still a baby and needs diapers .... so cute) and some days I had to make some clothes too (LOL I can't believe I did it with paper towel), and of course Monkey would join us for dinner and always sleeps with Pierre. " Or at least Boo-Boo Monkey did sleep with 4-year-old Pierre until the stuffed animal went missing somewhere in Federal Hill.
NEWS
February 22, 2011
As an animal activist, I was thrilled that Baltimore City chose to try the case against two teenagers accused of setting fire to a dog, and the fact that the public was so up-in-arms about what happened to poor Phoenix ("Strong response to dog's burning," Feb. 20).  Phoenix was heinously tortured and suffered in a way no living creature — human or animal — should have to. Luckily, there are laws against such crimes, and it seems those laws will be getting tougher.
NEWS
By Deborah Stoudt and Deborah Stoudt,Special to the Sun | January 23, 2000
Caring for an aging pet is much like caring for any aging family member, in that they can have many of the same health problems as humans: cancer, heart disease, arthritis, diabetes, vision and hearing loss, kidney failure and obesity. Just as the life expectancy for humans has expanded over the past 50 years, so it has for household cats and dogs. And just as medical care for humans has become high-tech, so it has for pets. Indeed, almost any medical procedure done on humans can now be performed on these companion animals.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | October 30, 2010
There was no mistaking Mary Schaub as she passed along the streets of Charles Village. I never saw her in any footwear but high heels. This time of the year, she might be sporting a mink stole over a tailored suit. She was easy to chat up and seemed to invite casual conversation at the bus stop. She had a tradition-heavy Baltimore job. She was a pari-mutuel clerk, another way of saying she sold or cashed tickets at Pimlico or Laurel. We often spoke of the pleasures and perils of playing the ponies.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2010
While serving an eviction notice this summer in East Baltimore, a team from the sheriff's office opened the door of vacated rowhouse to find two pit bulls left behind with no food or water — a black one waiting by the entrance, and a brown one in the living room, locked in a cage barely big enough to hold it. A few months earlier, if they had found animals like this, they would have called animal control to pick them up, end of story. Now, however, with the dogs safe, sheriffs launched an investigation to find their owner, hoping to have him charged with abandonment and neglect.
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