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NEWS
January 2, 1994
The EnterTRAINment Line is ready for Old Man Winter with a series of Sno-Ball Express train rides on Sundays, starting today and running into spring.The Sno-Ball Express will originate in Union Bridge and go through the Catoctin Mountains to Blue Ridge Summit, Pa. The 50-mile round trip takes 3 1/2 hours.The train will pass through Keymar and Detour before climbing the Catoctin mountains, rounding the horseshoe curve at Sabillisville and finally reaching the crest of the mountains in Pennsylvania.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
Edwin Cohen, a retired public school, university and religious school educator and administrator who was also executive director of Camps Airy and Louise in Western Maryland for nearly three decades, died June 21 of complications after surgery at Northwest Hospital in Randallstown. The longtime Pikesville resident was 87. "Ed was wonderful, cheerful and happy. He had a great sense of humor and an infectious smile," said Floyd L. Herman, rabbi emeritus at Har Sinai Congregation. "He really cared about all kinds of people and as a teacher, he wanted them to be able to do their best.
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NEWS
August 23, 2004
Douglas Grant Clark, a self-employed security alarm technician and former public television producer, died of a cerebral hemorrhage Tuesday at his home in Cascade. He was 59. Mr. Clark grew up in Homeland and graduated from the Gilman School in Baltimore and Hobart College in New York. He served in the Navy for four years and had a tour of duty in Vietnam aboard an aircraft carrier, said his son, Thomas Grant Clark of Greencastle, Pa. After his discharge from the Navy in the early 1970s, Mr. Clark took a job as a director and producer at Maryland Public Television.
NEWS
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2013
Maryland's Catoctin Mountain Park is closed to the public and 30 park employees have been furloughed as part of the federal government shutdown that began on Tuesday, National Park officials said. The park closed at noon with just a few roads remaining open for through traffic only. The closure affects all park facilities, ranging from hiking trails to campgrounds to picnic areas. Park officials said visitors already camping or occupying cabins at Catoctin will be notifed and given 48 hours to pack up and leave.
NEWS
March 14, 1995
The story of Mount St. Mary's, the tiny college in Emmittsburg that earned a bid to play in the national men's collegiate basketball championship this month, has something for everyone.Lovers of underdogs will be attracted to the story of a school of 1,400 students, the oldest independent Catholic college in America, making it to the coveted, nationally televised tournament for the first time in its 187 years. (Mount St. Mary's only began competing in the top Division I a few years ago.)Students of the game will be drawn to the professorial style of bow-tied Coach Jim Phelan, whose 737 career wins rank as the seventh most in college basketball history.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2004
THURMONT - How much does Lynne Cherry long for spring? Count the ways. She's defrosted the last sauce from tomatoes she'd grown; her pesto is long gone. The sight of bare stalks that once bore apples, plums, pears in her backyard garden is only too familiar. Something's got to give. Up here in the Catoctin Mountains, at some 1,800 feet, spring tends to dawdle before settling in, softening ground, stirring things up. First goes the hard snow surface, crunchy as Doritos beneath Cherry's boots, then the few inches of snow beneath, seeping into the earth or rushing into mountain streams and on toward the Potomac River.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joanne E. Morvay and Joanne E. Morvay,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 7, 2004
The most famous attraction in Thurmont is one the general public will likely never see for themselves. United States presidents since Franklin D. Roosevelt have been coming to Thurmont for rest and relaxation at Camp David, the official presidential retreat. Built in the Catoctin Mountains outside Thurmont, Camp David is off limits to the average citizen. But the chance to glimpse the commander in chief - or at least a famous member of his staff - has brought tourists to the town for more than 60 years.
NEWS
By Christina Asquith and Greg Tasker and Christina Asquith and Greg Tasker,Sun Staff Writers | June 26, 1995
FREDERICK -- A 37-year-old Randallstown man was found dead near Gambrill State Park in the wreckage of his small plane last night after more than a day of searching.Pilot Steven E. Weisbrod's single-engine Cessna 182 crashed into the side of the Catoctin Mountains in fog and rain Friday night.The plane, which had left Richmond, Va., about 7 p.m. last was seen on radar at 8:16 p.m., authorities said.Searchers flying over the rugged, heavily wooded area about 4 p.m. yesterday reported seeing the wreckage, and a few hours later the area was roped off and a coroner called in."
NEWS
By Mike Tidwell | July 17, 2013
I'm walking from Camp David to the White House starting Friday - 100 miles in the July heat. I'm doing this to honor the 19 firefighters who died fighting a wildfire near Prescott, Ariz., on June 30. These men died particularly horrifying deaths doing particularly heroic deeds. I'm also walking to honor the 50 men and women who died during the oil tanker train explosion this month in Lac-Megantic, Canada. My eight-day walk - joined by scores of other Marylanders and citizens from around the nation - will serve to memorialize these people as victims of tragically interconnected factors.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | December 4, 1995
Those big ole striped bass that haunt our reservoirs are smarter than you might think. When the Maryland Department of Natural Resources stocks trout off boat ramps, the stripers simply wait at ramp's end for dinner to plop in. Disoriented trout get gobbled up in shallow water before horrified DNR biologists can say "lemon butter sauce."But the biologists are smarter than the fish they manage. Last week they were giving boat rides to trout in the city's Prettyboy Reservoir, floating right by schools of hungry stripers to deliver trout to the relative safety of deeper water.
NEWS
By Mike Tidwell | July 17, 2013
I'm walking from Camp David to the White House starting Friday - 100 miles in the July heat. I'm doing this to honor the 19 firefighters who died fighting a wildfire near Prescott, Ariz., on June 30. These men died particularly horrifying deaths doing particularly heroic deeds. I'm also walking to honor the 50 men and women who died during the oil tanker train explosion this month in Lac-Megantic, Canada. My eight-day walk - joined by scores of other Marylanders and citizens from around the nation - will serve to memorialize these people as victims of tragically interconnected factors.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin, Special To The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2012
For eight years, Renee Gordon's son, Alex, has been attending Camp Greentop, a summer getaway in Maryland's Catoctin Mountains for people with disabilities. Now Gordon is now spearheading a campaign with Michael Hettleman to raise $1 million for the Baltimore-based League for People with Disabilities, which runs the camp. The money will be used to help families pay for the programs, which cost about $260 a day, and to provide training for counselors. "The camp provides the most incredible experience," Gordon said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joanne E. Morvay and Joanne E. Morvay,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 7, 2004
The most famous attraction in Thurmont is one the general public will likely never see for themselves. United States presidents since Franklin D. Roosevelt have been coming to Thurmont for rest and relaxation at Camp David, the official presidential retreat. Built in the Catoctin Mountains outside Thurmont, Camp David is off limits to the average citizen. But the chance to glimpse the commander in chief - or at least a famous member of his staff - has brought tourists to the town for more than 60 years.
NEWS
August 23, 2004
Douglas Grant Clark, a self-employed security alarm technician and former public television producer, died of a cerebral hemorrhage Tuesday at his home in Cascade. He was 59. Mr. Clark grew up in Homeland and graduated from the Gilman School in Baltimore and Hobart College in New York. He served in the Navy for four years and had a tour of duty in Vietnam aboard an aircraft carrier, said his son, Thomas Grant Clark of Greencastle, Pa. After his discharge from the Navy in the early 1970s, Mr. Clark took a job as a director and producer at Maryland Public Television.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2004
THURMONT - How much does Lynne Cherry long for spring? Count the ways. She's defrosted the last sauce from tomatoes she'd grown; her pesto is long gone. The sight of bare stalks that once bore apples, plums, pears in her backyard garden is only too familiar. Something's got to give. Up here in the Catoctin Mountains, at some 1,800 feet, spring tends to dawdle before settling in, softening ground, stirring things up. First goes the hard snow surface, crunchy as Doritos beneath Cherry's boots, then the few inches of snow beneath, seeping into the earth or rushing into mountain streams and on toward the Potomac River.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | March 5, 2001
The view from the unnamed ridge in Bosnia reminded Thomas E. Hickman of the rolling hills and trees of Maryland's Catoctin Mountains -- until he turned around. Behind him, he saw the skeletal remains of dozens of men, women and children, most likely those missing from a village near Kravica, a suburb of Srebrenica. "We stopped counting the bodies after 100," he said of that scene in October 1996. "There were no bullet marks or scrapes, or holes in the rocks, the trees. I looked at the bodies, and each one had a bullet hole in the back of the head."
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | March 5, 2001
The view from the unnamed ridge in Bosnia reminded Thomas E. Hickman of the rolling hills and trees of Maryland's Catoctin Mountains -- until he turned around. Behind him, he saw the skeletal remains of dozens of men, women and children, most likely those missing from a village near Kravica, a suburb of Srebrenica. "We stopped counting the bodies after 100," he said of that scene in October 1996. "There were no bullet marks or scrapes, or holes in the rocks, the trees. I looked at the bodies, and each one had a bullet hole in the back of the head."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
Edwin Cohen, a retired public school, university and religious school educator and administrator who was also executive director of Camps Airy and Louise in Western Maryland for nearly three decades, died June 21 of complications after surgery at Northwest Hospital in Randallstown. The longtime Pikesville resident was 87. "Ed was wonderful, cheerful and happy. He had a great sense of humor and an infectious smile," said Floyd L. Herman, rabbi emeritus at Har Sinai Congregation. "He really cared about all kinds of people and as a teacher, he wanted them to be able to do their best.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | March 23, 1996
THURMONT - Nature is a rough business. Mel Danner remembers when Canada geese dropped by the pond at the Catoctin Mountain Zoo, where the mute swans glide so gracefully. A goose then drowned a swan's baby by pushing its head under the water."We don't realize how cruel nature can be," says Mr. Danner, the zoo's director.Or how cruel business can be."Oh, absolutely. You stick your head out and watch it get chopped off."Chop, chop. The humans are skirmishing at the Catoctin Mountain Zoological Park a former snake farm turned try-real-hard neighborhood zoo in Frederick County.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | December 4, 1995
Those big ole striped bass that haunt our reservoirs are smarter than you might think. When the Maryland Department of Natural Resources stocks trout off boat ramps, the stripers simply wait at ramp's end for dinner to plop in. Disoriented trout get gobbled up in shallow water before horrified DNR biologists can say "lemon butter sauce."But the biologists are smarter than the fish they manage. Last week they were giving boat rides to trout in the city's Prettyboy Reservoir, floating right by schools of hungry stripers to deliver trout to the relative safety of deeper water.
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