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By Michael Pakenham | January 28, 2001
"It's Getting Better All the Time: 100 Greatest Trends of the Last 100 Years," by Stephen Moore and Julian L. Simon (Cato Institute, 294 pages, $14.95). Published in celebratory fashion by the unabashedly conservative Cato Institute, this is a compilation of serious capsules of research data that attest to the progress of the human race -- especially in the United States. Illustrated by clear and convincing charts and tables, and entirely sober in tone, it is an encouraging tale: elimination of diseases and control of others, diminution of the use of alcohol, vast increases in useful inventions, growth of generosity in the private sector, reduction in damaging accidents, significant progress for most minority groups.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 14, 2014
Despite all the opinions I have read recently, I was still stunned by the anti-marijuana-legalization screed in your paper arguing we should continue marijuana prohibition because alcohol prohibition was so successful ("Supporters of marijuana legalization misread history," March 11). Say what? Do the editors even read the stuff your op-ed writers send in before you publish it? Because I can't think of one other person who has ever argued that Prohibition was a success. And I'm not talking about starry eyed liberals.
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NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | March 7, 1995
WASHINGTON -- If the Republican Congress is truly serious about ending dependence on government handouts, it should look beyond the poor and also slash subsidies to corporate America, an unusual alliance of moderate, conservative and liberal policy experts declared yesterday.The government could save $265 billion over five years by eliminating or scaling back 120 spending programs and tax breaks that benefit particular industries, according to a report released by the Progressive Policy Institute (PPI)
NEWS
March 3, 2014
From the Blogs From the Baltimore Sun Op-Ed Page Mark Newgent writes about a topic that long-time Red Maryland readers are very familiar with:  Governor O'Malley's record does not correspond with his soaring rhetoric . Red Maryland March Poll The March Red Maryland Poll is open through Wednesday, March 12th at 9 PM.  Click here  to participate. An Anti-Liberty Amendment Brian Griffiths writes about a proposal from Maryland Republican Party 1st Vice-Chairman Collins Bailey to  shift the power of candidate selection from voters to insider cliques . A Controversial Outlet Mark Newgent writes about the Institute on the Constitution , highlighting its support of Christian Reconstructionism with as mark notes is “just as statist as any progressive vision of government.”  Stalled Pot Bill Not Boiling Greg Kline writes about the marijuana legalization bill  and how it has stalled on its way through the General Assembly.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 15, 1995
WASHINGTON -- On the 60th anniversary of Social Security, the biggest and most popular government benefits program, a former chief Social Security administrator helped launch a drive to convert the program into a private investment fund.Instead of paying Social Security taxes, workers would place their money into a variety of private plans offering combinations of stocks and bonds, according to the proposal offered yesterday by the Cato Institute, an influential conservative think-tank with close connections to GOP leaders of Congress.
NEWS
May 21, 1994
RECYCLING can prove hazardous to the environment and to your pocketbook, according to a new study of New Jersey's 1987 mandatory recycling law by the Cato Institute, a conservative think tank. It's an experience Maryland should study closely as it proceeds with ever higher recycling standards.The study found only 4 percent of targeted municipal trash is recycled. Net public cost: $35 million annually -- even after giving full value for the landfill space saved and payments for recyclable materials.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1996
Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke was deeply influenced by a conservative Washington think tank in his decision last week to experiment with parental choice in Baltimore's public school system.As he agonized over his efforts to improve the quality of education in Baltimore, Mr. Schmoke said in an interview, he came back time and again to the work of the Cato Institute, a foundation with a libertarian bent that promotes freeing American life from excessive government encroachment.Mr. Schmoke read a Cato Institute book on school choice and found himself underlining phrases such as "competitive market economy" and "tax credits or tax refunds" for parents who want alternatives to the "public school monopoly."
NEWS
January 2, 2008
Public planning often works well As a scholar and a regular consumer of policy analyses, I am rarely surprised by the occasional screed from the Cato Institute against some form or other of governmental regulation. So I was not taken aback when I read the column by Randal O'Toole, a senior fellow with the Cato Institute, railing against governmental planning ("When government plans, it usually fails," Opinion Commentary, Dec. 27). What surprised me was that The Sun, an otherwise reasonable newspaper, would publish such blatant ideological hogwash.
NEWS
March 14, 2014
Despite all the opinions I have read recently, I was still stunned by the anti-marijuana-legalization screed in your paper arguing we should continue marijuana prohibition because alcohol prohibition was so successful ("Supporters of marijuana legalization misread history," March 11). Say what? Do the editors even read the stuff your op-ed writers send in before you publish it? Because I can't think of one other person who has ever argued that Prohibition was a success. And I'm not talking about starry eyed liberals.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | March 7, 2003
IF YOU BELIEVE that what's good for General Motors is good for America, then you'll probably believe what Larry Burns, GM's vice president for research and development told The Wall Street Journal recently. Speaking about development of a pollution-free automobile, fueled by hydrogen, that emits only water vapor from the exhaust, Burns said: "We think we can build a compelling and affordable car by 2010. It's a big challenge, but as a technologist, you have to be optimistic." Where was GM's can-do spirit when it equated installing seat belts with the ruin of the auto industry, and later on, cried wolf over catalytic converters and air bags?
NEWS
January 2, 2008
Public planning often works well As a scholar and a regular consumer of policy analyses, I am rarely surprised by the occasional screed from the Cato Institute against some form or other of governmental regulation. So I was not taken aback when I read the column by Randal O'Toole, a senior fellow with the Cato Institute, railing against governmental planning ("When government plans, it usually fails," Opinion Commentary, Dec. 27). What surprised me was that The Sun, an otherwise reasonable newspaper, would publish such blatant ideological hogwash.
BUSINESS
By PAUL ADAMS and PAUL ADAMS,SUN REPORTER | April 11, 2006
Maryland gasoline prices have surged 39 cents in a month - and this time you can't blame it on hurricanes. Instead, petroleum industry analysts point to a perfect storm of a different kind - the combination of global unrest, rising demand and shrinking gasoline inventories. The result has been the largest March-to-April run-up in gas prices in Maryland since 2002, when prices jumped 21 cents, the AAA auto club said yesterday. "It's hard to justify the gigantic jumps that we're seeing this year," said Amanda Knittle, a spokeswoman for AAA. "They defy explanation in consumer's minds, and in our minds."
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | March 7, 2003
IF YOU BELIEVE that what's good for General Motors is good for America, then you'll probably believe what Larry Burns, GM's vice president for research and development told The Wall Street Journal recently. Speaking about development of a pollution-free automobile, fueled by hydrogen, that emits only water vapor from the exhaust, Burns said: "We think we can build a compelling and affordable car by 2010. It's a big challenge, but as a technologist, you have to be optimistic." Where was GM's can-do spirit when it equated installing seat belts with the ruin of the auto industry, and later on, cried wolf over catalytic converters and air bags?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | January 28, 2001
"It's Getting Better All the Time: 100 Greatest Trends of the Last 100 Years," by Stephen Moore and Julian L. Simon (Cato Institute, 294 pages, $14.95). Published in celebratory fashion by the unabashedly conservative Cato Institute, this is a compilation of serious capsules of research data that attest to the progress of the human race -- especially in the United States. Illustrated by clear and convincing charts and tables, and entirely sober in tone, it is an encouraging tale: elimination of diseases and control of others, diminution of the use of alcohol, vast increases in useful inventions, growth of generosity in the private sector, reduction in damaging accidents, significant progress for most minority groups.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 26, 1999
WASHINGTON -- A conservative Supreme Court majority that seems increasingly eager to question long-standing assumptions about what the Constitution means is flexing its power regularly and without apology.The notion that the court is becoming more of an active, not a restrained, user of its sometimes awesome constitutional authority seems to be widely held in the wake of the court term just ended.The most visible single result of that term: a sharp reduction of the federal government's power, offset by a significant enhancement of the power and independence of the 50 states' governments.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1996
Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke was deeply influenced by a conservative Washington think tank in his decision last week to experiment with parental choice in Baltimore's public school system.As he agonized over his efforts to improve the quality of education in Baltimore, Mr. Schmoke said in an interview, he came back time and again to the work of the Cato Institute, a foundation with a libertarian bent that promotes freeing American life from excessive government encroachment.Mr. Schmoke read a Cato Institute book on school choice and found himself underlining phrases such as "competitive market economy" and "tax credits or tax refunds" for parents who want alternatives to the "public school monopoly."
NEWS
March 3, 2014
From the Blogs From the Baltimore Sun Op-Ed Page Mark Newgent writes about a topic that long-time Red Maryland readers are very familiar with:  Governor O'Malley's record does not correspond with his soaring rhetoric . Red Maryland March Poll The March Red Maryland Poll is open through Wednesday, March 12th at 9 PM.  Click here  to participate. An Anti-Liberty Amendment Brian Griffiths writes about a proposal from Maryland Republican Party 1st Vice-Chairman Collins Bailey to  shift the power of candidate selection from voters to insider cliques . A Controversial Outlet Mark Newgent writes about the Institute on the Constitution , highlighting its support of Christian Reconstructionism with as mark notes is “just as statist as any progressive vision of government.”  Stalled Pot Bill Not Boiling Greg Kline writes about the marijuana legalization bill  and how it has stalled on its way through the General Assembly.
BUSINESS
By PAUL ADAMS and PAUL ADAMS,SUN REPORTER | April 11, 2006
Maryland gasoline prices have surged 39 cents in a month - and this time you can't blame it on hurricanes. Instead, petroleum industry analysts point to a perfect storm of a different kind - the combination of global unrest, rising demand and shrinking gasoline inventories. The result has been the largest March-to-April run-up in gas prices in Maryland since 2002, when prices jumped 21 cents, the AAA auto club said yesterday. "It's hard to justify the gigantic jumps that we're seeing this year," said Amanda Knittle, a spokeswoman for AAA. "They defy explanation in consumer's minds, and in our minds."
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 15, 1995
WASHINGTON -- On the 60th anniversary of Social Security, the biggest and most popular government benefits program, a former chief Social Security administrator helped launch a drive to convert the program into a private investment fund.Instead of paying Social Security taxes, workers would place their money into a variety of private plans offering combinations of stocks and bonds, according to the proposal offered yesterday by the Cato Institute, an influential conservative think-tank with close connections to GOP leaders of Congress.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | March 7, 1995
WASHINGTON -- If the Republican Congress is truly serious about ending dependence on government handouts, it should look beyond the poor and also slash subsidies to corporate America, an unusual alliance of moderate, conservative and liberal policy experts declared yesterday.The government could save $265 billion over five years by eliminating or scaling back 120 spending programs and tax breaks that benefit particular industries, according to a report released by the Progressive Policy Institute (PPI)
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